Title of Invention

VALVE FOR CONTROLLING A CONNECTION IN A HIGH-PRESSURE LIQUID SYSTEM, PARTICULARLY A FUEL INJECTION DEVICE FOR AN INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINE

Abstract The valve has a valve element (72) that is moved in the direction of its longitudinal axis (73), that protrudes into a valve pressure chamber (77) and which has a sealing surface (81) in the valve pressure chamber (77) at its front side that runs diagonal to its longitudinal axis (73), this sealing surface (81) working together with a valve seat (79) that runs diagonal to its longitudinal axis (73) to close, at least to a large extent, an opening (78) that is encircled by the valve seat (79) opposite the valve pressure chamber (77). A conduit (64) to a low-pressure region connects to the opening (78). The valve element (72) has a plug (83) that protrudes into the conduit (64). When the valve element (72) with its sealing surface (81) is lifted off from the valve seat (79), this plug (83) routes the fluid that flows off from the valve pressure chamber (77) in such a manner that the fluid exercises at least approximately no resulting force on the valve element (72) in the direction of its longitudinal axis (73).
Full Text

Valve to Control a Conduit in a High-Pressure Liquid System. Particularly of a Fuel Injection Device for an Internal Combustion Engine
Prior Art
The invention emanates from a valve to control a conduit in a high-pressure liquid system, particularly of a fuel injection device for an internal combustion engine according to the genre of Claim 1.
This type of valve has been established in EP 0 840 003 A and serves to control a conduit in a fuel injection device for an internal combustion engine. The valve has a valve element that can be driven in the direction of its longitudinal axis, that protrudes into a valve pressure chamber and that exhibits a sealing surface at its front side which is located diagonal to its longitudinal axis in the valve pressure chamber. The valve element, together with its sealing surface and the valve seat that is located at right angles to its longitudinal axis, works to seal an opening that is surrounded by the valve seat opposite the pressure chamber. High-pressure prevails thereby in the valve pressure chamber and a conduit leading to a low-pressure region is connected to the opening, whereby the valve pressure chamber conduit to the low-pressure region and therewith the pressure in the valve pressure chamber is controlled through the valve element. In the case of an opened valve, when the same has been lifted off from the valve seat with its sealing surface, fuel flows out from the valve pressure chamber and into the low-pressure region. Forces that impact upon the valve element in the direction of its longitudinal axis are created when fuel streams out and could result in uncontrolled movement of the valve element in the direction of its longitudinal axis. This could result in imprecise control of fuel injection, particularly the injected fuel quantities, or even in the emergence of a complete functional breakdown of the valve and therewith of the fuel injection device. Apart from this, due to the high speed of fuel flowing out of the valve pressure chamber into the

low-pressure region and of the suboptimal stream flow in the established valve, the same could result in cavitation and therewith result in damage to the valve element and/or of the valve seat.
Advantages of the Invention
The valve in accordance with the invention, exhibiting features according to Claim 1 has the advantage, when compared to prior art that the valve's functional capacity is ensured since at least approximately none or only very little force is created on the valve element by fuel flowing out of the valve pressure chamber.
Advantageous designs and other details of the valve, in accordance with the invention, are specified in the dependent claims. The design in accordance with Claim 2 enables a simple design of the pivot in order to achieve the desired effect. The design in accordance with Claim 5 enables an at least approximate cavitation-free liquid stream at the valve element and along the valve seat.
Drawing
Several exemplary embodiments of the invention are illustrated in the drawing and are explained in greater detail in the following description. Figure 1 is a simplified illustration of a longitudinal section of the fuel injection device for an internal combustion engine with a valve while Figure 2 is an enlargement of the longitudinal section of the valve in accordance with the first exemplary embodiment. Figure 3 is a modified design of the valve when compared to the first exemplary embodiment. Figure 4 shows a longitudinal section of the valve according to a second exemplary embodiment while Figure 5 illustrates the valve according to the second exemplary embodiment with a liquid stream and Figure 6 illustrates the valve in accordance with a modified design compared to the second exemplary embodiment.

Description of the Exemplary Embodiments
Figure 1 illustrates a fuel injection device for an internal combustion engine of a motor vehicle. The internal combustion engine is preferably a self-igniting one. The fuel injection device is, for example, designed as a so-called pump-injector element unit and exhibits a fuel high-pressure pump 10 for every cylinder of the internal combustion engine respectively as well as a fuel injection vafve 12 that is linked to the same, which together form a common unit. The fuel injection device can alternatively also be designed as a so-called pump-line injector system in which the fuel high-pressure pump and the fuel injection valve of each cylinder are located apart from one another and are connected to one another by a pipeline. The fuel injection device can, furthermore, also be designed as a direct injection system in which fuel is discharged into an accumulator by means of a high-pressure pump, with at least one injector being connected to the accumulator at which a control valve is located that is designed as the subsequently described valve 70. In addition, the subsequently described valve 70 can also be used for a direct injection system that is provided with a pressure relay valve that is to be preferably integrated close to the injector or integrated in the injector, whereby valve 70 is provided to control the pressure relay valve. The fuel high-pressure pump 10 has a pump casing 14 with a cylinder bore 16 in which a hermetically sealed pump piston is operated, which is driven at least indirectly by a cam 20 of a camshaft of the internal combustion engine against the force of a reset spring 19 in an elevating motion. The pump piston 18 borders a pumping chamber 22 in the cylinder bore 16 in which fuel is compressed under high pressure during the discharge stroke of the pump piston 18. Fuel is fed to the pumping chamber 22 from a fuel tank 24 of the motor vehicle.
The fuel injection valve 12 possesses a pump casing 14 that is connected to the valve body 26, which can be designed with multiple parts and in which an injection valve element 28 is operated to move lengthwise in a bore 30. The

valve body 26 exhibits at least one, preferably several injection apertures 32 at its end region that faces the combustion chamber of the cylinder of the internal combustion engine. The injection valve element 28 has a sealing surface 34 at its end region that faces the combustion chamber, this sealing surface being, for example, somewhat conical in shape and works together with a valve seat 36 designed in the valve body 26 in the end region that faces the combustion chamber, from which or to which the injection apertures 32 discharge. An annulus collector 38 is present in the valve body 26 between the injection valve element 28 and the bore 30 towards the valve seat 36, which crosses over at its end region that faces away from the valve seat 36, to a pressure chamber 40 surrounding the injection valve element 28 through a radial expansion of the bore 30. The injection valve element 28 exhibits a pressure shoulder 42 at the same level as that of the pressure chamber 40 through a decrease in the cross section. A pre-loaded recoil spring 44 which presses the injection valve element 28 towards the valve seat 36, acts at that end of the injection valve element 28 that faces away from the combustion chamber. The recoil spring 44 is located in a spring chamber 46 of the valve body 26 that is attached to the bore 30.
Another bore 48 in which a hermetically sealed control piston 50 is operated and which is connected to the injection valve element 28, is connected to the spring chamber 46 at its end that faces away from the bore 30 in the valve body 26. The bore 48 forms a control pressure chamber 52 that is bordered by the control piston 50 as a movable wall. The control piston 50 is supported at the injection valve element 28 by a piston rod 51 that has a smaller diameter in comparison and can be connected to the injection valve element 28. The control piston 50 can be designed as a single piece along with the injection valve unit 28 but for reasons of assembly, is preferably a separate piece connected to the injection valve element 28.
A conduit 60 in Figure 1 runs from the pumping chamber 22 though the pump casing 14 and the valve body 26 to the pressure chamber 40 of the fuel injection

valve 12. A conduit 62 runs from the pumping chamber 22 or from conduit 60 to the control pressure chamber 52. Over and above this, a conduit 64 that forms a connection to a pressure-relief chamber can be connected to the control pressure chamber 52 and can at least indirectly serve the fuel tank 24 or another region in which low pressure exists. A conduit 66 that is controlled by the first electrically operated control valve 68 runs from the pumping chamber 22 or from conduit 60 to the pressure-relief chamber. The fuel tank 24 or another low-pressure region can serve as a pressure-relief chamber. The control valve 68 can, as illustrated in Figure 1, be designed as a 2/2 solenoid valve. Switching the control valve 68 between its two change-over positions takes place though an actuator 69 that can, for example, be an electro-magnet against a reset spring.
A second electrically operated control valve 70 is provided to control pressure in the control pressure chamber 52. The second control valve 70 is designed as a 3/2 solenoid valve that can be switched between two change-over positions. In the first change-over position of the control valve 70, the control pressure chamber 52 gets connected to the pumping chamber 22 and separated from the fuel tank 24 while in the second change-over position of the control valve 70, the control pressure chamber 52 gets separated from the pumping chamber 22 and is connected to the pressure-relief chamber 24. A constriction 63 is provided in the conduit 62 of the control pressure chamber 52 to the pumping chamber 22 and a constriction 65 is provided in the conduit 64 of the control pressure chamber 52 to the pressure-relief chamber 24. Constriction 63 can either be located upstream in conduit 62 before the control valve 70 or, as illustrated in Figure 1, downstream in conduit 62 after the control valve 70. The control valve 70 has an actuator 71 that can either be an electro magnet, a piezo electric actuator or a magnetostrictive actuator through which the control valve 70 can be switched between its two change-over positions against a reset spring. The two control valves 68 and 70 are controlled by an electronic control device 67.

The second control valve 70 is described in greater detail subsequently with the help of Figure 2. The control valve 70 has a valve element 72 that is driven in the direction of its longitudinal axis 73 and can be moved by a shaft 74 and whose end region 75, that is larger in diameter compared to the shaft 74, protrudes into the valve pressure chamber 77. The valve pressure chamber 77 has the conduit 62 to the pumping chamber 22 flowing into it at one side while the conduit 64 to the pressure-relief chamber 24 flows into it at the other side. Conduit 62 thereby runs as an annular gap designed between the shaft 74 and the bore 76, surrounding the shaft. The bore 76 is designed with a diameter that is smaller than the valve pressure chamber 77. Conduit 64 that is designed as a duct or as a bore ends in an opening 78 in the valve pressure chamber 77 and is surrounded by a surface 79 that runs diagonal, preferably at least approximately perpendicular, to the longitudinal axis 73 of the valve element 72 and forms a valve seat. The valve element 72 has a projection 80 facing the valve seat 79 that is at least approximately cylindrical in shape and whose front side forms a sealing surface 81 that runs diagonally, preferably at least approximately perpendicular to the longitudinal axis 73 of the valve element 72. The projection 80 has a smaller diameter than the end region 75 of the valve element 72, whereby the diameter of the projection 80 is, however, larger than that of the opening 78.
As illustrated in Figure 2, sealing surface 81 runs in a radial direction, starting from the outer rim of the valve element 72, moving inwards and inclined in such a manner that the distance between this and the valve seat 79 increases in the direction of the longitudinal axis 73 of the valve element 72. A narrow sealing edge is thereby formed at the sealing surface 81 at its outer rim with which the sealing surface 81 comes into contact with the valve seat 79. A plug 83, which projects into the conduit 64 and is connected to opening 78, is located at the valve element 72 and this plug 83 is preferably designed as one piece at the valve element 72. The diameter of the bore 64 can be increased subsequently at the opening 78 as is illustrated in Figure 2. The plug 83 is designed in such a

manner that fuel flowing out through this from the valve pressure chamber 77 when the control valve 70 is open, can be re-routed in such a manner that basically no or only very little resulting fuel flows in the direction of the longitudinal axis 73 to the valve element 72. The plug 83 stretches in the direction of the longitudinal axis 73 of the valve element 72 to the same height as its sealing surface 81. The crossover from the internal rim of the sealing surface 81 to the plug 83 proceeds in a rounded manner, as illustrated in Figure 2. Thus fuel flowing out of the valve pressure chamber 77 that first flows along the sealing surface 81 in a somewhat radial manner inwards, is re-routed by the plug 83 in such a way that this subsequently flows approximately in the direction of the longitudinal axis 73 of the valve element 72 into the conduit 64. The flow of fuel is thus first turned around approximately 90° by the plug 83. The plug 83 has an enlargement 84 at its end which projects into the conduit 64, causing the fuel stream to turn around there once again and proceed away from this path at an angle y that is inclined to the longitudinal axis 73 of the valve element 72. The angle y can amount to more than 0° and approximately 90° or even more than 90°. Between the enlargement 84 and the sealing surface 81, the plug 83 exhibits a circular annular groove 85 whose side surfaces that face the direction of the valve element's 72 longitudinal axis 73, effect a re-routing of the fuel stream. As a result of multiple re-routing of the fuel stream at the side surfaces of the annular groove 85 forces produced balance out at least approximately during re-routing to the valve element 72 in the direction of its longitudinal axis 73, so that overall at least approximately no or only a minimal force is created on the valve element 72 by the fuel stream in the direction of the longitudinal axis 73. Crossovers between the side surfaces of the annular groove 85 at the base of the annular groove 85 and at the beginning of the plug 83 are each rounded in order to keep fuel loss at a minimum.
A conical crossover surface 87 that forms a second valve seat is provided at the crossover from the bore 76 into the valve pressure chamber 77. A second conical sealing surface 88 is located at the crossover from the end region 75 to

the shaft 74 that works together with the valve seat 87 to control the conduit 62. In the second change-over position of the control valve 70, the valve element 72 abuts the valve seat 87 with its second sealing surface 88 so that the conduit 62 to the pumping chamber 22 is separated. In the first change-over position of the control valve 70, the valve element 72 along with its second sealing surface 88 is located at a distance from the second valve seat 87 so that the conduit 62 to the pumping chamber 22 is open. In the first change-over position of the control valve 70, the valve element 72 lies with its sealing surface 81 against the valve seat 79.
The valve element 72 can be designed in such a manner that the same can also be moved by the actuator 71 into a third change-over position which is situated between the two preceding change-over positions already elucidated. A conduit of the valve pressure chamber 77 to the low-pressure area is thereby released by the valve element 72 with marginal cross-section of the stream through which only a throttled fuel flow can emerge from out of the valve pressure chamber 77. The pressure build-up in the control pressure chamber 52 is thus influenced in such a manner when the valve element 72 is located in its third change-over position, that a higher pressure prevails in the control pressure chamber 52 than when the valve element 72 is located in its first change-over position while, however, a lower pressure prevails than when the valve element 72 is located in its second change-over position. The control valve 70 is thereby designed as a 3/3 solenoid valve.
Figure 3 illustrates a modified design of the control valve 70 in which the conical valve seat 87and the conical sealing surface 88 of the valve element 72 are done away with. Instead of these, the valve element 72 is designed as a slider valve element to control the conduit 62. The valve element 72 can, thereby, plunge hermetically sealed into the bore 76 to close the conduit 62 with its end region 75, whereby the conduit 62 closes. The conduit 62 is released when the end

region 75 of the valve element 72 emerges from the bore 76 and is located in the valve pressure chamber 77.
The control valve 70 in Figure 4 is illustrated in accordance with the second exemplary embodiment in which the design is essentially the same as in the first exemplary embodiment but the design of the sealing surface 81 is, however, modified. The design of the plug 83 of the valve element 72 is the same as in the first exemplary embodiment. The sealing surface 81 is designed in such a manner that this, in its outer region 181, starting from its outer rim approaches the valve seat 79 in an inward radial manner. Region 181 of the sealing surface 81 is, thereby, inclined at an angle a to a level that is radial to the longitudinal axis 73 of the valve element 72 that should preferably at least approximately amount to 5°. Region 181 of the sealing surface 81 exhibits a radial extension 11 that should preferably amount to approximately 0.3 m when the diameter d of the valve element 72 is approximately 2.5mm. The sealing surface 81 is designed in such a manner in the second region 281 that connects to its first region 181, that the same is distanced from valve seat 79. The second region 281 of the sealing surface 81 is thereby inclined at an angle p to the radial level that should preferably amount at least approximately to 2°. The second region 281 of the sealing surface 81 has a radial extension 12 that should preferably amount to approximately 0.6mm. In its first region 181, the design of the sealing surface 81 forms a fuel intake region in which fuel flowing out from the valve pressure chamber 77 is directed to the smallest cross-section of the stream between the sealing surface 81 and the valve seat 79 and in whose second region 281 a fuel discharge region is formed in which fuel is led out from the smallest cross-section of the stream. As in the first exemplary embodiment, the valve seat 79 is designed at least approximately fiat and lies at a radial level with regard to the longitudinal axis 73 of the valve element 72. The crossover from the shell of the projection 80 of the valve element 72 to the first region 181 of the sealing surface 81 is preferably to be rounded with radius R as illustrated in Figure 4. Improved stream flow at the valve element 72 in accordance with the second exemplary

embodiment is explicit in Figure 5. While stream displacements occur in the valve element 72 according to the first exemplary embodiment when the fuel stream enters the narrowest cross-section of the stream between the sealing surface 81 and the valve seat 79, these types of stream displacements in a valve element 72 in accordance with the second exemplary embodiment are not present or at least present only to the smallest degree. Fuel loss is thereby reduced and cavitation-free fuel flow achieved.
In Figure 6, the control valve 70 is illustrated in accordance with a modified design when compared to the second exemplary embodiment. The sealing surface 81 at the valve element is hereby designed to be at least approximately flat and lies at a level that is radial with reference to the longitudinal axis 73 of the valve element 72. The valve seat 79 is designed in such a manner that the same converges in the sealing surface 81 in an external region 179, starting from its outer rim and moving inwards in a radial direction. The region 179 of the valve seat 79 is thereby inclined at an angle a to the radial level of the longitudinal axis 73 of the valve element 72 that should preferably amount at least approximately to 5°. The region 179 of the valve seat 79 exhibits a radial extension 11 that should preferably amount to approximately 0.3mm in the case of a diameter d of the valve element 72 of approximately 2.5 mm, starting from the outer rim of the sealing surface 81 of the valve element. In its second region 279 that connects to the first region 179, the valve seat 79 is designed in such a manner that the same is distanced from the sealing surface 81. The second region 279 of the valve seat 79 is thereby inclined at an angle p to the radial level that should preferably amount to at least approximately 2°. The second region 279 of the valve seat 79 exhibits a radial extension 12 that should preferably amount to approximately 0.6 mm. Through this configuration that is opposite to that of the second exemplary embodiment, the same advantages are achieved with regard to optimised stream control as with the second exemplary embodiment.

The function of the fuel injection device is explained below. In the case of an intake stroke of the pump piston 18, fuel is fed from the pressure-relief chamber 24 to the pump piston 18. In the case of a discharge stroke of the pump piston 18, fuel injection begins with pre-injection, whereby the first control valve 68 is closed by the control device 67 so that the pumping chamber 22 is separated from the pressure-relief chamber 24. Over and above this, the second control valve 70 is brought into its second change-over position by the control device 67 so that the control pressure chamber 52 is connected to the pressure-relief chamber 24 while being separated from the pumping chamber 22. In this case high pressure cannot build up in the control pressure chamber 52. When pressure in the pumping chamber 22 and therewith in the pressure chamber 40 of the fuel injection valve 12, is that great that the compressive force of the pressure that is trained on the injection valve element 28 through the pressure shoulder 42 is greater than the sum of the load of the recoil spring 44 and the compressive force impacting on the control pistons 50 through the residual pressure acting in the control pressure chamber 52, the injection valve element 28 moves in the opening direction 29 and releases the injection aperture 32, of which there is at least one.
In order to terminate pre-injection that has taken place in this manner, the second control valve 70 is brought to its first change-over position by the control device so that the control pressure chamber 52 is separated from the pressure-relief chamber 24 and is connected to the pumping chamber 22. The first control valve 68 remains in its closed position. High-pressure thereby builds up in the control pressure chamber 52 as in the pumping chamber 22 so that a large compressive force impacts on the control piston 50 in the closing direction and the injection valve element 28 is moved into its closing position.
The second control valve 70 is brought into its second change-over position by the control device 67 for a subsequent main injection so that the control pressure chamber 52 is connected to the pressure-relief chamber 24 and separated from

the pumping chamber 22. The fuel injection valve 12 then opens as a result of reduced compressive force on the control piston 50 and the injection valve element 28 moves into its opening position.
The second control valve 70 is brought into its first change-over position by the control device 67 in order to terminate the main injection so that the control pressure chamber 52 is separated from the pressure-relief chamber 24 and connected to the pumping chamber 22 and high-pressure builds up here and the fuel injection valve 12 closes through the force impacting upon the control piston 50. Post-injection can still take place after the main injection for which the second control valve 70 has to be brought into its second change-over position. In order to terminate post-injection, the second control valve 70 is brought back to its first change-over position and/or the first control valve 68 opens.
A control valve 70, whose design has been described earlier, can also be used in other fuel injection devices or high-pressure liquid systems to control a conduit. The control valve 70 can also be designed as a 2/2 solenoid valve, a 2/3 solenoid valve or as a 3/3 solenoid valve.

Claims
1. Valve to control a conduit in a high-pressure liquid system, a fuel
injection device for an internal combustion engine in particular, with a
valve element (72) that can be moved in the direction of its longitudinal
axis (73), that projects into a valve pressure chamber (77), in which
high-pressure prevails at least occasionally and has a sealing surface
(81) in the valve pressure chamber (77) at its front side that runs
diagonal to its longitudinal axis (73), this sealing surface (81) working
together with a valve seat (79) that runs diagonal to its longitudinal axis
(73) to close, at least to a large extent, an opening (78) that is
encircled by the valve seat (79) opposite the valve pressure chamber
(77), whereby a conduit (64) to a low-pressure region connects to the
opening (78), characterised in that the valve element (72) has a plug
(83) that protrudes into the conduit (64) through which fuel flowing off
from the valve pressure chamber (77) when the valve element (72)
with its sealing surface (81) is lifted off from the valve seat (79), is
routed in such a manner that at least approximately no or only a
marginal resulting force is exercised on the valve element (72) in the
direction of its longitudinal axis (73).
2. Valve according to Claim 1 characterised in that fluid flowing from the
valve pressure chamber (77) is initially re-routed in such a manner by
the plug (83) that the same flows at least approximately in the direction
of the longitudinal axis (73) of the valve element (72) along the valve
element (72) and into the conduit (64).

3. Valve according to Claim 2 characterised in that the fluid flowing off is
re-routed in such a manner by the plug (83) that the same flows at an
angle y to the longitudinal axis (73) of the valve element (72) and
inclined from this path.
4. Valve according to one of Claims 1 to 3 characterized in that the plug
(83) for re-routing the fluid flowing off, exhibits a circular annular
groove (85) which stretches in the direction of the longitudinal axis (73)
of the valve element (72) at least approximately up to the height of the
sealing surface (81) of the valve element (72).
5. Valve according to one of the preceding claims characterized in that
the sealing surface (81) at the valve element (72) and/or the valve seat
(79) is designed in such a manner that the distance between the
sealing surface (81) and the valve seat (79) in the direction of the
longitudinal axis (73) of the valve element (72) reduces inwards in a
radial direction, starting from the outer rim of the valve element (72)
and subsequently increases again inwards in a radial direction.
6. Valve according to Claim 5 characterized in that the sealing surface
(81) of the valve element (72) is designed at least approximately flat.
7. Valve according to Claim 5 characterized in that the valve seat (79) is
designed at least approximately flat.


Documents:

1013-CHENP-2006 AMENDED CLAIMS 18-03-2011.pdf

1013-CHENP-2006 AMENDED PAGES OF SPECIFICATION 18-03-2011.pdf

1013-CHENP-2006 OTHER PATENT DOCUMENT 18-03-2011.pdf

1013-chenp-2006 correspondence others 27-12-2010.pdf

1013-chenp-2006 form-3 18-03-2011.pdf

1013-CHENP-2006 POWER OF ATTORNEY 18-03-2011.pdf

1013-CHENP-2006 EXAMINATION REPORT REPLY RECEIVED 18-03-2011.pdf

1013-CHENP-2006 FORM-18 26-09-2007.pdf

1013-chenp-2006-abstract.pdf

1013-chenp-2006-claims.pdf

1013-chenp-2006-correspondnece-others.pdf

1013-chenp-2006-description(complete).pdf

1013-chenp-2006-drawings.pdf

1013-chenp-2006-form 1.pdf

1013-chenp-2006-form 26.pdf

1013-chenp-2006-form 3.pdf

1013-chenp-2006-form 5.pdf

1013-chenp-2006-pct.pdf


Patent Number 249652
Indian Patent Application Number 1013/CHENP/2006
PG Journal Number 44/2011
Publication Date 04-Nov-2011
Grant Date 01-Nov-2011
Date of Filing 24-Mar-2006
Name of Patentee ROBERT BOSCH GmbH
Applicant Address Postfach 30 02 20, 70442 Stuttgart
Inventors:
# Inventor's Name Inventor's Address
1 RODRIGUEZ-AMAYA, Nestor Dennerstr. 70, 70372 Stuttgart
2 MENNICKEN, Michael WENNTALSTRASSE 10, 71299 Wimsheim
3 GREIF, Hubert Platanenweg 53, 71706 Markgroeningen
4 RZYMANN, Thilo Haefnersweg, 40, 71522 Backnang
5 HOLLMANN, Christoph Am Ring 68/1, 71642 Ludwigsburg
6 BECK, Matthias Schwilkenhofstr 81, 70439 Stuttgart
7 PETRY, Falk-Alexander Lindenspuerstr. 21, 70176 Stuttgart
PCT International Classification Number F02M59/46,47/02
PCT International Application Number PCT/DE2004/001744
PCT International Filing date 2004-08-04
PCT Conventions:
# PCT Application Number Date of Convention Priority Country
1 103 44 897.7 2003-09-26 Germany