Title of Invention

"NOVEL ORGANIC LIGHT EMITTING COMPOUND AND DEVICE USING THE SAME"

Abstract Disclosed is an organic light emitting device. The organic light emitting device comprises a first electrode, organic material layer(s) comprising a light emitting layer, and a second electrode. The first electrode, the organic material layer(s), and the second electrode form layered structure and at least one layer of the organic material layer(s) include the compound of Formula 1 or the compound of Formula 1 into which a thermosetting or photo-crosslinkable functional group is introduced.
Full Text Technical Field
[1] The present invention relates to an organic light emitting device in which a novel
compound capable of significantly improving a lifespan, efficiency, and elec­trochemical and thermal stabilities of the organic light emtting device is contained in an organic compound layer.
[2]
Background Art
[3] An organic light emission phenomenon is an example of a conversion of current
into visible rays through an internal process of a specific organic molecule. The organic light emission phenomenon is based on the following mechanism. When an organic material layer is interposed between an anode and a cathode, if voltage is applied between the two electrodes, electrons and holes are injected from the cathode and the anode into the organic material layer. The electrons and the holes which are injected into the organic material layer are recombined to form an exciton. and the exciton is reduced to a bottom state to emit light. An organic light emitting device which is based on the above mechanism typically comprises a cathode, an anode, and an organic material layer, for example, an organic material layer including a hole injection layer, a hole transport layer, a light emitting layer, and an electron transport layer, interposed therebetween. [4] The materials used in the organic light emitting device are mostly pure organic
materials or complexes of organic material and metal. The material used in the organic light emitting device may be classified as a hole injection material, a hole transport material, a light emitting material, an electron transport material, or an electron injection material, according to its use. In connection with this, an organic material having a p-type property, which is easily oxidized and is electrochemically stable when it is oxidized, is mostly used as the hole injection material or the hole transport material. Meanwhile, an organic material having an n-type property, which is easily reduced and is electrochemically stable when it is reduced, is used as the electron injection material or the electron transport material. As the light emitting layer material, an organic material having both p-type and n-type properties is preferable, which is stable when it is oxidized and when it is reduced. Also a material having high light emission efficiency for conversion of the exciton into light when the exciton is formed is preferable.
[5] In addition, it is preferable that the material used in the organic light emitting device
further have the following properties.
[6] First, it is preferable that the material used in the organic light emitting device have
excellent thermal stability. The reason is that joule heat is generated by movement of electric charges in the organic light emitting device. NPB, which has recently bee.n used as the hole transport layer material, has a glass transition temperature of 100°C or lower, thus it is difficult to apply to an organic light emitting device requiring a high current.
[7] Second, in order to produce an organic light emitting device that is capable of being
actuated at low voltage and has high efficiency, holes and electrons which are injected into the organic light emitting device must be smoothly transported to a light emitting layer, and must not be released out of the light emitting layer. To achieve this, a material used in the organic light emitting device must have a proper band gap and a proper HOMO or LUMO energy levels. A LUMO energy level of PEDOT:PSS, which is currently used as a hole transport material of an organic light emitting device produced using a solution coating method, is lower than that of an organic material used as a light emitting layer material, thus it is difficult to produce an organic light emitting device having high efficiency and a long lifespan.
[8] Moreover, the material used in the organic light emitting device must have excellent
chemical stability, electric charge mobility, and interfacial characteristic with an electrode or an adjacent layer. That is to say, the material used in the organic light emitting device must be little deformed by moisture or oxygen. Furthermore, proper hole or electron mobility must be assured so as to balance densities of the holes and of the electrons in the light emitting layer of the organic light emitting device to maximize the formation of excitons. Additionally, it has to be able to have a good interface with an electrode including metal or metal oxides so as to assure stability of the device.
[9] Accordingly, there is a need to develop an organic light emitting device including
an organic material having the above-mentioned requirements in the art. [10]
Disclosure of Invention Technical Problem
[11] Therefore, the object of the present inventions is to provide an organic light
emitting device which is capable of satisfying conditions required of a material usable for an organic light emitting device, for example, a proper energy level, elec­trochemical stability, and thermal stability, and which includes a fluorene derivative having a chemical structure capable of playing various roles required in the organic
light emitting device, depending on a substituent group. [12]
Technical Solution
[13) The present invention provides an organic light emitting device which comprises a
first electrode, organic material layer(s) comprising a light emitting layer, and a second electrode, wherein the first electrode, the organic material layer(s), and the second electrode form a layered structure and at least one layer of the organic material layer(s) includes a compound of the following Formula 1 or a compound of Formula 1 into which a thermosetting or photo-crosslinkable functional group is introduced:
[14] [Formula 1]
[15]
[16] In Formula 1,X is C or Si,
[17] A is
(Formula Rempved)

, and
[18]
[19] a and b are zero or positive integer.
[20] Y is a bond; bivalent aromatic hydrocarbons; bivalent aromatic hydrocarbons which
are substituted with at least one substituent group selected from the group consisting of nitro, nitrile, halogen, alkyl, alkoxy, and amino groups; a bivalent heterocyclic group; or a bivalent heterocyclic group which is substituted with at least one substituent group
selected from the group consisting of nitro, nitrile, halogen, alkyl, alkoxy, and amino groups. [21] Y1 to Y4 are each independently bivalent aromatic hydrocarbons; bivalent aromatic
hydrocarbons which are substituted with at least one substiruent group selected from the group consisting of nitro, nitrile, halogen, alkyl, alkoxy, and amino groups; a bivalent heterocyclic group; or a bivalent heterocyclic group which is substituted with at least one substituent group selected from the group consisting of nitro, nitrile, halogen, alkyl, alkoxy, and amino groups. [22] Z1 to Z8 are each independently hydrogen; aliphatic hydrocarbons having a carbon
number of 1 - 20; aromatic hydrocarbons; aromatic hydrocarbons which are substituted with at least one substituent group selected from the group consisting of the nitro, nitrile, halogen, alkyl, alkoxy, amino, aromatic hydrocarbon, and heterocyclic groups; a silicon group substituted with aromatic hydrocarbons; a heterocyclic group; a het­erocyclic group which is substituted with at least one substiruent group selected from the group consisting of the nitro. nitrile, halogen, alkyl. alkoxy, amino, aromatic hy­drocarbon, and heterocyclic groups; a thiophenyl group which is substituted with hy­drocarbons having a carbon number of 1 - 20 or aromatic hydrocarbons having a carbon number of 6 - 20; or a boron group which is substituted with aromatic hy­drocarbons. [23] Rl to Rl 1 are each independently hydrogen, a substituted or unsubstituted alkyl
group, a substituted or unsubstituted alkoxy group, a substituted or unsubstituted alkenyl group, a substituted or unsubstituted aryl group, a substituted or unsubstituted arylamine group, a substituted or unsubstituted heterocyclic group, an amino group, a nitrile group, a nitro group, a halogen group, an amide group, or an ester group. R1 to Rl 1 may form aliphatic or hetero condensation rings along with adjacent groups. [24] R7 and R8 may be directly connected to each other, or may form a condensation
ring along with a group selected from the group consisting of O, S, NR, PR, C=O, CRR', and SiRR'. R and R' are each independently or collectively hydrogen, a substituted or unsubstituted alkyl group, a substituted or unsubstituted alkoxy group, a substituted or unsubstituted alkenyl group, a substituted or unsubstituted aryl group, a substituted or unsubstituted arylamine group, a substituted or unsubstituted het­erocyclic group, a nitrile group, an amide group, or an ester group. R and R' may form a condensation ring to form a spiro compound.
[25] A detailed description will be given of the substituent groups of Formula 1.
[26] In Zl to Z8 as the substituent groups of Formula 1, the aromatic hydrocarbons are
exemplified by monocyclic aromatic rings, such as phenyl, biphenyl, and terphenyl, and multicyclic aromatic rings, such as naphthyl, anthracenyl, pyrenyl, and perylenyl. The heterocyclic group is exemplified by thiophene, furan, pyrrole, imidazole,
thiazole, oxazole. oxadiazole, thiadiazole, triazole, pyridyl. pyridazyl. pyrazine. quinoline, and isoquinoline.
[27] Examples of aliphatic hydrocarbons having a carbon number of 1 - 20 include
straight chain aliphatic hydrocarbons, branched chain aliphatic hydrocarbons, saturated aliphatic hydrocarbons, and unsaturated aliphatic hydrocarbons. They are exemplified by an alkyl group, such as a methyl group, an ethyl group, an n-propyl group, an iso-propyl group, an n-butyl group, a sec-butyl group, an iso-butyl group, a ter-butyl group, a pentyl group, and a hexyl group; an alkenyl group having a double bond, such as styryl: and an alkynyl group having a triple bond, such as an acetylene group.
[28] The carbon number of the alkyl, alkoxy, and alkenyl groups of R1 to R11 of
Formula 1 is not limited, but is preferably 1 - 20.
[29] The length of the alkyl group contained in the compound does not affect the
conjugate length of the compound, but may affect the method of applying the compound to the organic light emitting device, for example, a vacuum deposition method or a solution coating method.
[30] Illustrative, but non-limiting, examples of the aryl group of R1 to R11 of Formula 1
include monocyclic aromatic rings, such as. a phenyl group, a biphenyl group, a terphenyl group, and a stilbene group, and multicyclic aromatic rings, such as a naphthyl group, an anthracenyl group, a phenanthrene group, a pyrenyl group, and a perylenyl group.
[31 ] Illustrative, but non-limiting, examples of the arylamine group of R1 to R11 of
Formula 1 include a diphenylamine group, a dinaphthylamine group, a dibiphenylamine group, a phenylnaphthylamine group, a phenyldiphetylamine group, a ditolylamine group, a phenyltolylamine group, a carbazolyl group, and a triph-enylamine group.
[32] Illustrative, but non-limiting, examples of the heterocyclic group of R1 to R11 of
Formula 1 include a thiophenyl group, a furan group, a pyrrolyl group, an imidazolyl group, a thiazolyl group, an oxazolyl group, an oxadiazolyl group, a triazolyl group, a pyridyl group, a pyradazine group, a quinolinyl group, an isoquinoline group, and an acridyl group.
[33] In addition, illustrative, but non-limiting, examples of the alkenyl, aryl, arylamine,
and heterocyclic groups of Rl to Rl 1 of Formula 1 include compounds shown in the following Formulae.
[34](Formula Rempved)

[35] In the above Formulae, Z is a group selected from the group consisting of hydrogen,
aliphatic hydrocarbons having a carbon number of 1 - 20, an alkoxy group, an arylamine group, an aryl group, a heterocyclic group, a nitrile group, and an acetylene group. Examples of the arylamine. aryl, and heterocyclic groups of Z are as shown in the above-mentioned substituent groups of R1 to R11.
[36] According to a preferred embodiment of the present invention. X of Formula 1 is C,
and R7 and R8 are directly connected to each other, or form a condensation ring along with a group selected from the group consisting of O, S, NR, PR, C=O, CRR', and SiRR' (R and R' are as defined in Formula 1).
[37] According to another preferred embodiment of the present invention, X of Formula
1 is Si, and R7 and R8 are directly connected to each other, or form a condensation ring along with a group selected from the group consisting of O, S, NR, PR, C=O, CRR', and SiRR' (R and R' are as defined in Formula 1).
[38] According to still another preferred embodiment of the present invention, the
compound of Formula 1 are any one of compounds of the following Formulae 2 to 5. [39] [Formulae 2 to 5]
[40]
[41] In the above Formulae, A and B are as defined in Formula 1.
[42] Illustrative, but non-limiting, examples of A and B groups of Formula 1 are as
follows. Combination of the compounds of Formulae 2 to 5 and the following groups can form various derivatives. For example, if the compound of Formula 2 is combined with the group 1, the resulting product will be designated by the compound of Formula 2-1.
[43] [A and B]
(Formula Rempved)
Brief Description of the Drawings
f 107] FIG. 1 illustrates an organic light emitting device comprising a substrate 1. an
anode 2, a light emitting layer 3, and a cathode 4; and
[108] FIG. 2 illustrates an organic light emitting device comprising a substrate 1, an
anode 2, a hole injection layer 5, a hole transport layer 6, a light emitting layer 7, an
electron transport layer 8, and a cathode 4.
[109]
Best Mode for Carrying Out the Invention
[110] Hereinafter, a detailed description will be given of the present invention.
[111] Various substituent groups are introduced into a core structure shown in Formula 1.
in detail, the core structure in which a fluorene group is bonded to a combination of an acridine group and a carbazolyl group to form a spiro structure, thereby the compound of Formula 1 has characteristics suitable for application to an organic material layer used in an organic light emitting device. This will be described in detail, below.
[112] The steric core structure of the compound of Formula 1, for convenience of ex-
planation, can be divided into two portions, A and B, as shown in the following Formula.
[113]

[114] The compound of Formula 1 has the steric core structure in which a plane A meets
with a plane B at right angles around X, and conjugation does not occur between the A and B portions around X. Furthermore, since one nitrogen atom is positioned among three aryl groups in the plane B. conjugation is limited in the plane B.
[115] The conjugation length of the compound has a close relationship with an energy
band gap. In detail, the energy band gap is reduced as the conjugation length of the compound increases. As described above, since a conjugation structure is limited in the core structure of the compound of Formula 1. the core structure has a large energy band gap.
[116] As described above, in the present invention, various substituent groups are
introduced to R1 to R11 positions and Z1 to Z8 positions of the core structure having the large energy band gap so as to produce compounds having various energy band gaps. Generally, it is easy to control the energy band gap by introducing substituent groups into a core structure having a large energy band gap, but it is difficult to sig­nificantly control the energy band gap by introducing substituent groups into a core structure having a small energy band gap. Furthermore, in the present invention, it is possible to control HOMO and LUMO energy levels of the compound by introducing various substituent groups into the Rl to Rl 1 positions and the Zl to Z8 positions of
the core structure. [117] Additionally, by introducing various substituent groups into the core structure,
compounds having intrinsic characteristics of the substituent groups can be synthesized. For example, substituent groups, which are frequently applied to hole injection layer materials, hole transport layer materials, light emitting layer materials, and electron transport layer materials which are used during the production of the organic light emitting device, are introduced into the core structure so as to produce substances capable of satisfying requirements of each organic material layer. For example, since the core structure of the compound of Formula 1 includes the arylamine structure, it has an energy level suitable for the hole injection and/or hole transport materials in the organic light emitting device. In the present invention, the compound having the proper energy level is selected depending on the substituent group among the compounds represented by Formula 1 to be used in the organic light emitting device, thereby it is possible to realize a device having a low actuating voltage and a high light efficiency. [118] Furthermore, various substituent groups are symmetrically introduced into the core
structure (the A and B portions are located at both sides of the core structure) so as to precisely control the energy band gap. improve interfacial characteristics with organic materials, and apply the compound to various fields. [ 119] As well, if the number of amine contained in the substituent groups A and B are
each set to 4 or more (the numbers of amine contained in the A and B structures are each 2 or more), it is possible to precisely control the HOMO and LUMO energy levels and the energy band gap, and on the other hand interfacial characteristics with the organic materials is improved and thereby make it possible to apply the compound to various fields. [120] Additionally, various substituent groups are introduced into the steric structure of
the compound of Formula 1 using spiro bonding to control the three-dimensional structure of the organic material so as to minimize π-π interaction in the organic material, thereby formation of excimers is prevented. [121] With respect to the energy band gap and the energy level, for example, since the
compound of Formula 2-1, in which arylamine is introduced into the hole transport material or the hole injection material of the structure of Formula 1, has HOMO of 5.22 eV, it has an energy level suitable for the hole injection layer or the hole transport layer. Meanwhile, the compound of Formula 2-1 has the band gap of 2.89 eV, which is still larger than that of NPB, typically used as the hole transport layer material, thus it has a LUMO value of about 2.33 eV, which is considered to be very high. If a compound having a high LUMO value is used as the hole transport layer, it increases the energy wall of LUMO of the material constituting the light emitting layer to
prevent the movement of electrons from the light emitting layer to the hole transport layer. Accordingly, the above-mentioned compound improves the light emission efficiency of the organic light emitting device so that efficiency is higher than that of conventionally used NPB (HOMO 5.4 eV, LUMO 2.3 eV, and energy band gap 3.1 eV). In the present invention, the energy band gap is calculated by a typical method using a UV-VIS spectrum. [122] As well, the compound of Formula 1 has stable redox characteristics. Redox stab
ility is estimated using a CV (cyclovoltammetry) method. For example, if oxidation voltage is repeatedly applied to the compound of Formula 2-1, oxidation repeatedly occurs at the same voltage and the current amount is the same. This means that the compound has excellent stability to oxidation. [123] Meanwhile, since the compound of Formula 1 has a high glass transition
temperature (Tg), it has excellent thermal stability. For example, the glass transition temperature of the compound of Formula 2-1 is 172°C, which is still higher than that of conventionally used NPB (Tg: 96°C). Such increase in thermal stability is an important factor providing actuating stability to the device. [124] Furthermore, the compound of Formula 1 may be used to form the organic material
layer using a vacuum deposition process or a solution coating process during the production of the organic light emitting device. In connection with this, illustrative, but non-limiting, examples of the solution coating process include a spin coating process, a dip coating process, an inkjet printing process, a screen printing process, a spray process, and a roll coating process. [125] Tertiary alcohol, which is produced by a reaction of a lithiated aryl and keto group,
is heated in the presence of an acid catalyst to form a hexagonal cyclic structure while water is removed, thereby producing the compound having a spiro structure according to the present invention. The above-mentioned procedure for producing the compound is well known in the art, and those skilled in the art can change the production conditions during the production of the compound of Formula 1. The production will be described in detail in the preparation examples later. [126] The organic light emitting device of the present invention can be produced using
known materials through a known process, modified only in that at least one layer of organic material layer(s) includes the compound of the present invention, that is, the compound of Formula 1. [ 127] The organic material layer(s) of the organic light emitting device according to the
present invention may have a single layer structure, or alternatively, a multilayered structure in which two or more organic material layers are layered. For example, the organic light emitting device of the present invention may comprise a hole injection layer, a hole transport layer, a light emitting layer, an electron transport layer, and an
electron injection layer as the organic material layer(s). However, the structure of the organic light emitting device is not limited to this, but may comprise a smaller number of organic material layers.
[128] Furthermore, the organic light emitting device of the present invention may be
produced, for example, by sequentially layering a first electrode, organic material layer(s), and a second electrode on a substrate. In connection with this, a physical vapor deposition (PVD) method, such as a sputtering method or an e-beam evaporation method, may be used, but the method is not limited to these.
[129] A method of producing the compound of Formula 1 and the production of the
organic light emitting device using the same will be described in detail in the following preparation examples and examples. However, the following preparation examples and examples are set forth to illustrate, but are not to be construed to limit the present invention.
[130]
Mode for the Invention
[131] A better understanding of a method of producing an organic compound represented
by Formula 1 and the production of an organic light emitting device using the same may be obtained in light of the following preparation examples and examples which are set forth to illustrate, but are not to be corstrued to limit the present invention.
[132] In order to produce the compound represented by Formula 1, any one of the
compounds of the following Formulae, a to c, may be used as a starting material.
[133]
[134]
[135] PREPARATION EXAMPLE 1: Production of a starting material represented by
Formula a
[136]
[137] Carbazole (1.672 g, 10 mmol), l-bromo-2-iodobenzene (1.5 ml, 12 mmol),
potassium carbonate (K CO , 2.7646 g, 20 mmol), copper iodide (Cul, 95 mg, 0.5 mmol), and 25 ml of xylene were refluxed in a nitrogen atmosphere. After cooling to normal temperature, a product was extracted with ethyl acetate, water was removed
with anhydrous magnesium sulfate (MgSO ). and the solvent was removed at a reduced pressure. The resulting product was passed through a silica gel column using a hexane solvent to produce a compound, the solvent was removed at a reduced pressure, and vacuum drying was conducted to produce the resulting white solid compound (800 mg, 25 9c yield). MS: [M+H]+ = 323. [138] [ 139) PREPARATION EXAMPLE 2: Production of a starting material represented by
Formula b [140]
[141] The starting material represented by Formula a (6.96 g, 21.6 mmol) was dissolved
in 300 ml of purified THF and cooled to -78°C, and n-BuLi (2.5 M in hexane, 8.64 ml. 21.6 mmol) was slowly dropped thereon. Stirring was conducted at the same temperature for 30 min, and 2,7-dibromo-9-fluorenone (6.08 g. 18.0 mmol) was added thereto. After stirring at the same temperature for 40 min, the temperature was raised to normal temperature and stirring was carried out for an additional 3 hours. The reaction was completed in an ammonium chloride (NH Cl) aqueous solution, and extraction was conducted with ethyl ether. Water was removed from an organic material layer using anhydrous magnesium sulfate (MgSO ), and an organic solvent was then removed therefrom. The produced solid was dispersed in ethanol, stirred for one day. filtered, and vacuum dried to produce 10.12 g of intermediate material (96.7 % yield). The intermediate solid was dispersed in 10 ml of acetic acid, ten drops of concentrated sulfuric acid were added thereto, and reflux was conducted for 4 hours. The resulting solid was filtered, washed with ethanol, and vacuum dried to produce 9.49 g of compound of Formula b (96.8 % yield). MS: [M+H]+= 563. [142] [143] PREPARATION EXAMPLE 3: Production of a starting material represented by
Formula c [144]
[145] The starting material represented by Formula b (10.0 g, 17.8 mmol) was completely
dissolved in 200 ml of THF, 4-chloro-phenylboronic acid (8.30 g, 53.3 mmol), 2M potassium carbonate solution, tetrakis(triphenylphosphine)palladium(0) (0.62 g, 0.53 mmol), and 10 ml of ethanol were added thereto, and reflux was conducted for 24 hours. After the reaction was completed, cooling to normal temperature was conducted, and filtration was conducted. Washing was conducted with water and ethanol several times. Recrystallization was conducted with ethanol, and vacuum drying was conducted to produce a compound (9.5 g, 85 % yield). MS: [M+H]+= 625.
[146]
[147] EXAMPLE 1: Production of the compound represented by Formula 2-1
[1481
[149] 1) Synthesis of arylamine (4-(N-phenyl-N-phenylamino)phenyl-l-phenylamine) to
produce the compound represented by Formula 2-1: 13.5 g of 4-bromophenyl-N-phenyl-N-phenylamine (41.6 mmol) and 3.98 ml of aniline (43.7 mmol) were dissolved in 120 ml of toluene, 10.00 g of sodium-tert-butoxide (104.1 mmol), 0.48 g of bis(dibenzylidene acetone)palladium(0) (0.83 mmol). and 0.58 ml-of 50 wt% tri-tert-butylphosphine toluene solution (1.25 mmol) were added thereto, and reflux was conducted in a nitrogen atmosphere for 2 hours. Distilled water was added to the reaction solution to complete the reaction, and the organic layer was extracted. A column separation process was conducted using a solvent of n-hexane and tetrahydrofuran at a ratio of 10:1. stirring was conducted using petroleum ether, and vacuum drying was conducted to produce an arylamine connection group (9.6 g, yield 69 %). MS: [M+H]+= 336. [150] 2) 3.0 g of compound of Formula b (5.3 mmol) and 4.12 g of
4-(N-phenyl-N-phenylamino)phenyl-l-phenylamine (12.3 mmol) were dissolved in 80 ml of toluene, 1.54 g of sodium-tert-butoxide (16.0 mmol). 0.06 g of bis(dibenzylidene acetone)palladium(0) (0.11 mmol), and 0.06 ml of 50 wt% tri-tert-butylphosphine toluene solution (0.16 mmol) were added thereto, and reflux was conducted in a nitrogen atmosphere for 2 hours. Distilled water was added to the reaction solution to complete the reaction, and the organic layer was extracted. A column separation process was conducted using a solvent of n-hexane and tetrahydrofuran at a ratio of 4:1, stirring was conducted using petroleum ether, and vacuum drying was conducted to produce the compound of Formula 2-1 (2.7 g, yield 47 %). MS: [M+H]+= 1074. [151]
[152] EXAMPLE 2: Production of the compound represented by Formula 2-2
[153]
[154] 1) Synthesis of arylamine (4-(N-phenyl-N-phenylamino)phenyl-l-naphthylamine)
to produce the compound represented by Formula 2-2: 15.0 g of 4-bromophenyl-N-phenyl-N-phenylamine (46.3 mmol) and 7.29 g of 1-naphthylamine (50.9 mmol) were dissolved in 200 ml of toluene, 13.34 g of sodium-tert-butoxide (138.8 mmol), 0.53 g of bis(dibenzylidene acetone)palladium(0) (0.93 mmol), and 0.56 ml of 50 wt% tri-tert-butylphosphine toluene solution (1.39 mmol) were added thereto, and reflux was conducted in a nitrogen atmosphere for 2 hours. Distilled water was added to the reaction solution to complete the reaction, and the organic layer was extracted. A column separation process was conducted using a solvent of n-hexane and tetrahydrofuran at a ratio of 10:1, stirring was conducted using petroleum ether, and vacuum drying was conducted to produce an arylamine connection group (13 g, yield 73 %). MS: [M+H]+= 386.
[155] 2) 5.00 g of compound of Formula b (8.88 mmol) and 7.90 g of
4-(N-phenyl-N-phenylamino)phenyl-1-naphthylamine (20.4 mmol) were dissolved in . 120 ml of toluene, 5.89 g of sodium-tert-butoxide (61.3 mmol), 0.24 g of
tris(dibenzylidene acetone)dipalladium(0) (0.41 mmol), and 0.25 ml of 50 wt% tri-tert-burylphosphine toluene solution (0.61 mmol) were added thereto, and reflux was conducted in a nitrogen atmosphere for 2 hours. Distilled water was added to the reaction solution to complete the reaction, and the organic layer was extracted. A column separation process was conducted using a solvent of n-hexane and tetrahydrofuran at a ratio of 4:1. stirring was conducted using petroleum ether, and vacuum drying was conducted to produce the compound of Formula 2-2 (5.2 g, yield 50%).MS:[M+H]*=1174. [156]
[157] EXAMPLE 3: Production of the compound represented by Formula 2-4
[158]
[159] 1) Synthesis of arylamine (4-(N-phenyl-N-phenylamino)phenyl-l-biphenylamine)
to produce the compound represented by Formula 2-4: 17.4 g of
4-bromophenyl-N-phenyl-N-phenylamine (53.7 mmol) and 9.99 g of 4-aminobiphenyl (59.0 mmol) were dissolved in 250 ml of toluene, 17.02 g of sodium-tert-butoxide (177.1 mmol), 0.68 g of bis(dibenzylidene acetone)palladium(0) (1.2 mmol), and 0.72 ml of 50 wt% tri-tert-butylphosphine toluene solution (1.8 mmol) were added thereto, and reflux was conducted in a nitrogen atmosphere for 2 hours. Distilled water was added to the reaction solution to complete the reaction, and the organic layer was extracted. A column separation process was conducted using a solvent of n-hexane and tetrahydrofuran at a ratio of 10:1, stirring was conducted using petroleum ether, and vacuum drying was conducted to produce an arylamine connection group (16 g. yield 73%). MS:[M+H]+=412. [160] 2) 4.7 g of compound of Formula b (8.3 mmol) and 7.9 g of
4-(N-phenyl-N-phenylamino)phenyl-l-biphenylamine (19.2 mmol) were dissolved in 150 ml of toluene, 5.53 g of sodium-tert-butoxide (57.5 mmol), 0.22 g of bis(dibenzylidene acetone)palladium(0) (0.38 mmol). and 0.23 ml of 50 wt% tri-tert-butylphosphine toluene solution (0.58 mmol) were added thereto, and reflux was conducted in a nitrogen atmosphere for 2 hours. Distilled water was added to the reaction solution to complete the reaction, and the organic layer was extracted. A column separation process was conducted using a solvent of n-hexane and tetrahydrofurian at a ratio of 4:1, stirring was conducted using petroleum ether, and vacuum drying was conducted to produce the compound of Formula 2-4 (4.9 g, yield 48 %). MS: [M+H]+= 1225. [161]
[ 162] EXAMPLE 4: Production of the compound represented by Formula 2-18
[163]
[164] 1) Synthesis of arylamine (4-(N-phenyl-N-naphthylamino)phenyl-l-phenylamine)
to produce the compound represented by Formula 2-18: 7.00 a of 4-bromophenyl-N-phenyl-N-naphthylamine (18.7 mmol) and 2.56 ml of aniline (28.1 mmol) were dissolved in 100 ml of toluene, 5.40 g of sodium-tert-butoxide (56.1 mmol), 0.22 g of bis(dibenzylidene acetone)palladium(0) (0.37 mmol), and 0.28 ml of 50 wt% tri-tert-butylphosphine toluene solution (0.37 mmol) were added thereto, and reflux was conducted in a nitrogen atmosphere for 2 hours. Distilled water was added to the reaction solution to complete the reaction, and the organic layer was extracted. A column separation process was conducted using a solvent of n-hexane and tetrahydrofuran at a ratio of 10:1, stirring was conducted using petroleum ether, and vacuum drying was conducted to produce an arylamine connection group (5.1 g, yield 70 %). MS: [M+H]+= 386. [165] 2) 2.5 g of compound of Formula b (4.4 mmol) and 3.86 g of
4-(N-phenyl-N-naphthylamino)phenyl-l-phenylamine (10.0 mmol) were dissolved in 50 ml of toluene, 1.26 g of sodium-tert-butoxide (13.2 mmol), 0.08 g of tris(dibenzylidene acetone)dipalladium(0) (0.08 mmol), and 0.04 ml of 50 wt% tri-tert-butylphosphine toluene solution (0.13 mmol) were added thereto, and reflux was conducted in a nitrogen atmosphere for 2 hours. Distilled water was added to the reaction solution to complete the reaction, and the organic layer was extracted. A column separation process was conducted using a solvent of n-hexane and tetrahydrofuran at a ratio of 4:1, stirring was conducted using petroleum ether, and vacuum drying was conducted to produce the compound of Formula 2-18 (2.5 g, yield 49%). MS:[M+H]+=1173. [166]
[167] EXAMPLE 5: Production of the compound represented by Formula 2-19
[168]
[169] 1) Synthesis of arylamine (4-(N-phenyl-N-naphthylamino)phenyl-l-naphthylamine)
to produce the compound represented by Formula 2-19: 14.0 g of 4-bromophenyl-N-phenyl-N-naphthylamine (37.4 mmol) and 6.43 g of 1-naphthylamine (44.9 mmol) were dissolved in 200 ml of toluene, and 0.645 g of bis(dibenzylidene acetone)palladium(0) (1.12 mmol), 0.74 ml of 50 wt% tri-tert-butylphosphine toluene solution (1.5 mmol), and 8.99 g of sodium-tert-butoxide (93.5 mmol) were added thereto. After reflux was conducted in a nitrogen atmosphere for 2 hours, distilled water was added to the reaction solution to complete the reaction. The organic layer was extracted, a column separation process was conducted using a developing solvent of n-hexane and tetrahydrofuran at a ratio of 10:1, stirring was
conducted using petroleum ether, and vacuum drying was conducted to produce an arylamine connection group (8.53 g. yield 52.2 %). MS: [M+H]+ = 437. [170] 2) 5.00 g of compound of Formula b (8.88 mmol) and 8.53 g of
4-(N-phenyl-N-naphthylamino)phenyl-l-naphthylamine (19.5 mmol) were dissolved in 50 ml of toluene, and 0.204 g of bis(dibenzylidene acetone)palladium(0) (0.360 mmol). 0.31 ml of 50 wt% tri-tert-butylphosphine toluene solution (0.62 mmol), and 4.69 g of sodium-tert-butoxide (48.8 mmol) were added thereto. After reflux was conducted in a nitrogen atmosphere for 2 hours, distilled water was added to the reaction solution to complete the reaction. The organic layer was extracted, a column separation process was conducted using a developing solvent of n-hexane and tetrahydrofuran at a ratio of 8:1, stirring was conducted using petroleum ether, and vacuum drying was conducted to produce the compound of Formula 2-19 (5.60 g, yield 49.5 %). MS: [M+H]+= 1227.
[171]
[ 172] EXAMPLE 6: Production of the compound represented by Formula 2-21
[173]
[174] 1) Synthesis of arylamine (4-(N-phenyl-N-naphthylamino)phenyl-1 -biphenylamine)
to produce the compound represented by Formula 2-21: 14.0 g of 4-bromophenyl-N-phenyl-N-naphthylamine (37.4 mmol) and 6.96 g of 4-aminobiphenyl (41.2 mmol) were dissolved in 200 ml of toluene, and 0.47 g of bis(dibenzylidene acetone)palladium(0) (0.82 mmol), 0.50 ml of 50 wt% tri-tert-butylphosphine toluene solution (1.2 mmol), and 11.86 g of sodium-tert-butoxide (123.4 mmol) were added thereto. After reflux was conducted in a nitrogen atmosphere for 2 hours, distilled water was added to the reaction solution to complete the reaction. The organic layer was extracted, a column separation process was conducted using a developing solvent of n-hexane and tetrahydrofuran at a ratio of 10:1. stirring was conducted using petroleum ether, and vacuum drying was conducted to produce an arylamine connection group (7.5 g. yield 43 %). MS: [M+H]+= 462.
[175] 2) 3.3 g of compound of Formula b (5.8 mmol) and 5.90 g of
4-(N-phenyl-N-naphthylamino)phenyl-l-biphenylamine (12.8 mmol) were dissolved in 70 ml of toluene, and 0.15 g of bis(dibenzylidene acetone)palladium(0) (0.26 mmol), 0.16 ml of 50 wt% tri-tert-butylphosphine toluene solution (0.38 mmol), and 3.68 g of sodium-tert-butoxide (38.3 mmol) were added thereto. After reflux was conducted in a nitrogen atmosphere for 2 hours, distilled water was added to the reaction solution to complete the reaction. The organic layer was extracted, a column separation process was conducted using a developing solvent of n-hexane and tetrahydrofuran at a ratio of 8:1, stirring was conducted using petroleum ether, and vacuum drying was conducted to produce the compound of Formula 2-21 (3.9 g, yield 51 %). MS: [M+H]+= 1227.
[176]
[177] EXAMPLE 7: Production of the compound represented by Formula 2-256
[178]
[179] 1) Synthesis of arylamine (4-(N.N-diphenylamino)-biphenyl-aniline) to produce the
compound represented by Formula 2-256: 4.00 g of
4-chlorobiphenyl-N,N-diphenylamine (11.2 mmol) and 1.13 ml of aniline (12.4 mmol) were dissolved in 100 ml of toluene, and 0.129 g of bis(dibenzylidene acetone)palladium(0) (0.225 mmol). 0.17 ml of 50 wt% tri-tert-butylphosphine toluene solution (0.34 mmol). and 2.70 g of sodium-tert-butoxide (28.1 mmol) were added thereto. After reflux was conducted in a nitrogen atmosphere for 5 hours, distilled water was added to the reaction solution to complete the reaction. The organic layer was extracted, a column separation process was conducted using a developing solvent of n-hexane and tetrahydrofuran at a ratio of 10:1, stirring was conducted using petroleum ether, and vacuum drying was conducted to produce an arylamine connection group as an amine derivative (3.77 g, yield 81.3 %). MS: [M+H]+= 413. [180] 2) 2.30 g of compound of Formula b (4.08 mmol) and 3.70 g of
4-(N,N-diphenylamino)-biphenyl-aniline (8.97 mmol) were dissolved in 30 ml of toluene, and 0.094 g of bis(dibenzylidene acetone)palladium(0) (0.16 mmol), 0.14 ml of 50 wt% tri-tert-butylphosphine toluene solution (0.29 mmol), and 2.16 g of sodium-tert-butoxide (22.4 mmol) were added thereto. After reflux was conducted in a nitrogen atmosphere for 2 hours, distilled water was added to the reaction solution to complete the reaction. The organic layer was extracted, a column separation process was conducted using a developing solvent of n-hexane and tetrahydrofuran at a ratio of 8:1, stirring was conducted using petroleum ether, and vacuum drying was conducted to produce the compound of Formula 2-256 (2.7 g, yield 54 %). MS: [M+H]+= 1227. [181]
[182] EXAMPLE 8: Production of the compound represented by Formula 3-2
[183]
[184] 1) Synthesis of arylamine (4-(N-phenyl-N-phenylamino)phenyl-l-naphthylamine)
to produce the compound represented by Formula 3-2: Synthesis was conducted through the same procedure as in synthesis of the arylamine connection group of Formula 2-2. [ 185] 2) 5.00 g of compound of Formula c (7.98 mmol) and 7.09 g of
4-(N-phenyl-N-phenylamino)phenyl-l-naphthylamine (18.4 mmol) were dissolved in 120 ml of toluene, 5.29 g of sodium-tert-butoxide (55.0 mmol), 0.21 g of bis(dibenzylidene acetone)palladium(0) (0.37 mmol), and 0.22 ml of 50 wt% tri-tert-butylphosphine toluene solution (0.55 mmol) were added thereto, and reflux was conducted in a nitrogen atmosphere for 2 hours. Distilled water was added to the

reaction solution to complete the reaction, and the organic layer was extracted. A column separation process was conducted using a solvent of n-hexane and tetrahydrofuran at a ratio of 4:1, stirring was conducted using petroleum ether, and vacuum drying was conducted to produce the compound of Formula 2-2 (5.6 g, yield 53 %). MS: [M+H]+= 1174.
[186]
[ 187] EXAMPLE 9: Production of an organic light emitting device
[188]
[189] A glass substrate (coming 7059 glass), on which 1TO (indium tin oxide) was
applied to a thickness of 1000 A to form a thin film, was put in distilled water, in which a detergent was dissolved, and washed using ultrasonic waves. In connection with this, a product manufactured by Fischer Inc. was used as the detergent, and distilled water was produced by filtering twice using a filter manufactured by Millipore Inc. After ITO was washed for 30 min, ultrasonic washing was conducted twice using distilled water for 10 min. After the washing using distilled water was completed, ultrasonic washing was conducted using isopropyl alcohol, acetone, and methanol solvents, and drying was then conducted. Next, it was transported to a plasma washing machine. Furthermore, the substrate was dry washed using oxygen plasma for 5 min. and then transported to a vacuum evaporator.
[190] ' Hexanitrile hexaazatriphenylene (hereinafter, referred to as "HAT") of the
following Formula was vacuum deposited to a thickness of 80 A by heating on a transparent ITO electrode, which was prepared through the above procedure, so as to form a thin film. The thin film can improve the characteristics of an interface of the substrate and a hole injection layer. Subsequently, the compound of Formula 2-1 was deposited on the thin film to a thickness of 800 A to form an anode including an ITO conductive layer and an N-type organic material.
[191]
[HAT]

[192] NPB was deposited thereon to a thickness of 300 A so as to form a hole transport
layer, and Alq3 was then deposited thereon to a thickness of 300 A to form a light emitting layer. An electron transport layer material of the following Formula was deposited to a thickness of 200 A on the light emitting layer to form an electron transport layer. [193]
[NPB]
[194] [195]
Electron transport layer materiaI

[196] Lithium fluoride (LiF) having a thickness of 12 A and aluminum having a thickness
of 2000 A were sequentially deposited on the electron transport layer to form a cathode.
[197] In the above procedure, the deposition speed of an organic material was maintained
at 0.3 - 0.8 A/sec. Furthermore, lithium fluoride and aluminum were deposited at
speeds of 0.3 A/sec and 1.5 - 2.5 A/sec, respectively, on the cathode. During the deposition, a vacuum was maintained at 1 - 3 X 10-7.
[198] The resulting device had an electric field of 8.78 V at a forward current density of
100 mA/cm , and a spectrum having a light efficiency of 2.01 lm/W. The operation and light emission of the device at the above-mentioned actuating voltage mean that the compound of Formula 2-1, which formed the layer between the thin film on the substrate and the hole transport layer, functions to inject holes.
[200] EXAMPLE 10: Production of an organic light emitting device
[201]
[202] The procedure of example 9 was repeated to produce a device except that the
compound of Formula 2-1 used as the hole injection layer was substituted with the compound of Formula 2-2. [203] The resulting device had an electric field of 8.75 V at a forward current density of
100 mA/cm2, and a spectrum having at a light efficiency of 2.01 lm/W. [204]
[205] EXAMPLE 11: Production of an organic light emitting device
[206] [207] The procedure of example 9 was repeated to produce a device except that the
compound of Formula 2-1 used as the hole injection layer was substituted with the compound of Formula 2-4. [208] The resulting device had an electric field of 7.36 V at a forward current density of
100 mA/cm2, and a spectrum having at a light efficiency of 2.12 lm/W. [209]
[210] EXAMPLE 12: Production of an organic light emitting device
[211]
[212] The procedure of example 9 was repeated to produce a device except that the
compound of Formula 2-1 used as the hole injection layer was substituted with the compound of Formula 2-18. [213] The resulting device had an electric field of 8.58 V at a forward current density of
100 mA/cm2, and a spectrum having at a light efficiency of 1.97 lm/W. [214]
[215] EXAMPLE 13: Production of an organic light emitting device
[216] [217] The procedure of example 9 was repeated to produce a device except that the
compound of Formula 2-1 used as the hole injection layer was substituted with the compound of Formula 2-19. [218] The resulting device had an electric field of 9.20 V at a forward current density of
100 mA/cm", and a spectrum having at a light efficiency of 2.36 lm/W. [219]
[220] EXAMPLE 14: Production of an organic light emitting device
[221] [222] The procedure of example 9 was repeated to produce a device except that the
compound of Formula 2-1 used as the hole injection layer was substituted with the compound of Formula 2-21.
[223] The resulting device had an electric field of 8.18 V at a forward current density of
100 mA/cm2, and a spectrum having at a light efficiency of 2.67 lm/W.
[224]
[225]. EXAMPLE 15: Production of an organic light emitting device
[226]
[227] The procedure of example 9 was repeated to produce a device except that the
compound of Formula 2-1 used as the hole injection layer was substituted with the compound of Formula 2-256.
[228] The resulting device had an electric field of 6.79 V at a forward current density of
100 mA/cm2, and a spectrum having at a light efficiency of 1.83 lm/W.
[229]
[230] EXAMPLE 16: Production of an organic light emitting device
[231]
[232] The procedure of example 9 was repeated to produce a device except that the
compound of Formula 2-1 used as the hole injection layer was substituted with the compound of Formula 3-2.
[233] The resulting device had an electric field of 8.91 V at a forward current density of
100 mA/cm2, and a spectrum having at a light efficiency of 2.08 lm/W.
[234]
Industrial Applicability
[235] The compound of the present invention can be used as an organic material layer
material, particularly, hole injection and/or transport materials in an organic light emitting device, and when applied to an organic light emitting device it is possible to reduce the actuating voltage of the device, to improve the light efficiency thereof, and to improve the lifespan of the device through the thermal stability of the compound.







We Claim:
1. An organic light emitting device, comprising: a first electrode; organic material layer(s) comprising a light emitting layer, wherein at least one layer of the organic material layer(s) includes the compound of Formula 1 or a compound of Formula 1 into which a thermosetting or photo-crosslinkable functional group is introduced; and a second electrode; wherein the first electrode, the organic material layer(s), and the second electrode form layered structure.
[Formula 1]
(Formula Rempved)
a and b are zero or positive integer;
Y is a bond; bivalent aromatic hydrocarbons; bivalent aromatic hydrocarbons which are substituted with at least one substituent group selected from the group consisting of nitro, nitrile, halogen, alkyl, alkoxy, and amino groups; a bivalent heterocyclic group; or a bivalent heterocyclic group which is substituted with at least one substituent group selected from the group consisting of nitro, nitrile, halogen, alkyl, alkoxy, and amino groups; Yl to Y4 are each bivalent aromatic hydrocarbons; bivalent aromatic hydrocarbons which are substituted with at least one substituent group selected from the group consisting of nitro, nitrile, halogen, alkyl, alkoxy, and amino groups; a bivalent heterocyclic group; or a bivalent heterocyclic group which is substituted with at least one substituent
group selected from the group consisting of nitro, nitrile, halogen, alkyl, alkoxy, and amino groups; Zl to Z8 are each independently hydrogen; aliphatic hydrocarbons having a carbon number of 1 - 20; aromatic hydrocarbons; aromatic hydrocarbons which are substituted with at least one substituent group selected from the group consisting of the nitro, nitrile, halogen, alkyl, alkoxy, amino, aromatic hydrocarbon, and heterocyclic groups; a silicon group substituted with aromatic hydrocarbons; a heterocyclic group; a heterocyclic group which is substituted with at least one substituent group selected from the group consisting of the nitro, nitrile, halogen, alkyl, alkoxy, amino, aromatic hydrocarbon, and heterocyclic groups; a thiophenyl group which is substituted with hydrocarbons having a carbon number of 1 - 20 or aromatic hydrocarbons having a carbon number of 6 - 20; or a boron group which is substituted with aromatic hydrocarbons; R to R'l are each independently hydrogen, a substituted or unsubstituted alkyl group, a substituted or unsubstituted alkoxy group, a substituted or unsubstituted alkenyl group, a substituted or unsubstituted aryl group, a substituted or unsubstituted arylamine group, a substituted or unsubstituted heterocyclic group, an amino group, a nitrile group, a nitro group, a halogen group, an amide group, or an ester group, and Rl to Rll may form aliphatic or hetero condensation rings along with adjacent groups; and
R7 and R8 may be directly connected to each other, or may form a condensation ring along with a group selected from the group consisting of O, S, NR, PR, C=0, CRR', and SiRR', wherein R and R' are each independently or collectively are hydrogen, a substituted or unsubstituted alkyl group, a substituted or unsubstituted alkoxy group, a substituted or unsubstituted alkenyl group, a substituted or unsubstituted aryl group, a substituted or unsubstituted arylamine group, a substituted or unsubstituted heterocyclic group, a nitrile group, an amide group, or an ester group, and may form a condensation ring to form a spiro compound.
2. The organic light emitting device as claimed in claim 1, wherein R7 and R8 of Formula 1 form a condensation ring along with a group selected from the group consisting of O, S, NR, PR, C=O, CRR', and SiRR' (R and R' being as defined in Formula 1
3. The organic light emitting device as claimed in claim 1, wherein the compound of Formula 1 is any one of compounds of Formulae 2 to 5:
(Formula Rempved)

in the above Formulae, A and B are as defined in Formula 1.
4. The organic light emitting device as claimed in claim 1, wherein A or B of Formula 1 is any one of following groups
5. The organic light emitting device as claimed in claim 1, wherein the organic material layer(s) comprise a hole transport layer, and the hole transport layer includes the compound of Formula 1 or the compound of Formula 1 into which the thermosetting or photo-crosslinkable functional group is introduced.
6. The organic light emitting device as claimed in claim 1, wherein the organic material layer(s) comprise a hole injection layer, and the hole injection layer includes the compound of Formula 1 or the compound of Formula 1 into which the thermosetting or photo-crosslinkable functional group is introduced.
(Formula Rempved)
7. The organic light emitting device as claimed in claim 1, wherein the organic material layer(s) comprise a layer which both injects and transports holes and which includes the compound of Formula 1 or the compound of Formula 1 into which the thermosetting or photo-crosslinkable functional group is introduced.

Documents:

763-DELNP-2007-Abstract-(25-02-2011).pdf

763-delnp-2007-abstract.pdf

763-DELNP-2007-Claims-(25-02-2011).pdf

763-delnp-2007-claims.pdf

763-DELNP-2007-Correspondence Others-(22-03-2011).pdf

763-DELNP-2007-Correspondence-Others-(25-02-2011).pdf

763-DELNP-2007-Correspondence-Others.pdf

763-DELNP-2007-Description (Complete)-(25-02-2011).pdf

763-delnp-2007-description (complete).pdf

763-delnp-2007-drawings.pdf

763-DELNP-2007-Form-1-(25-02-2011).pdf

763-delnp-2007-form-1.pdf

763-delnp-2007-form-18.pdf

763-DELNP-2007-Form-2-(25-02-2011).pdf

763-delnp-2007-form-2.pdf

763-DELNP-2007-Form-3-(25-02-2011).pdf

763-DELNP-2007-Form-3.pdf

763-delnp-2007-form-5.pdf

763-delnp-2007-gpa.pdf

763-delnp-2007-pct-210.pdf

763-delnp-2007-pct-301.pdf

763-delnp-2007-pct-304.pdf

763-DELNP-2007-Petition 137-(25-02-2011).pdf


Patent Number 247993
Indian Patent Application Number 763/DELNP/2007
PG Journal Number 23/2011
Publication Date 10-Jun-2011
Grant Date 08-Jun-2011
Date of Filing 29-Jan-2007
Name of Patentee LG CHEM, LTD.
Applicant Address 20, YOIDO-DONG, YOUNGDUNGPO-GU, SEOUL,150-721, REPUBLIC OF KOREA.
Inventors:
# Inventor's Name Inventor's Address
1 JAE MIN MOON 3-507 LG CHEMISTRY DORMITORY, DORYONG-DONG, YUSEONG-GU, DAEJEON METROPOULITAN CITY, 305-340, REPUBLIC OF KOREA.
2 WOOK DONG CHO 107-1006 EXPO APT., 15/3 464-1 JEONMIN-DONG, YUSEONG-GU, DAEJEON METROPOLITAN CITY, 305-761, REPUBLIC OF KOREA.
3 JI EUN KIM 7-403 LG CHEMISTRY APT., 381-42 DORYONG-DONG, YUSEONG-GU, DAEJEON METROPOLITAN CITY, 305-340, REPUBLIC OF KOREA.
4 BYUNG SUN JEON 1006 TAEYOUNG APT., SILLIM 5-DONG, GWANAK-GU, SEOUL, 151-708, REPUBLIC OF KOREA.
5 DONG SEOB JEONG 301, 733-38, BANPO-DONG, SEOCHO-DU, SEOUL, 137-040, REPUBLIC OF KOREA.
6 SEOK HEE YOON 302-904 SONGGANG GREEN APT., SONGGANG-GU, YUSEONG-GU, DAEJEON METROPOLITAN CITY, 305-756, REPUBLIC OF KOREA.
PCT International Classification Number C09K 11/06
PCT International Application Number PCT/KR2005/003176
PCT International Filing date 2005-09-23
PCT Conventions:
# PCT Application Number Date of Convention Priority Country
1 10-2004-007 7245 2004-09-24 Republic of Korea