Title of Invention

METHOD IN WIRELSS COMMUNICATIONS NETWORK/DEVICE AND WIRELESS COMMUNICATION NETWORK INFRASTRUCTURE ENTITY

Abstract A method in wireless communications networks including transmitting a radio resource assignment (520) to a wireless communications device in response to a request (510), transmitting radio resource assignment time-out information to the wireless communications device, for example, in the assignment message (520), wherein the radio resource assignment time-out information specifies a duration during which the radio resource assignment to the wireless communications device remains valid after the wireless communications device discontinues communication on the radio resource assigned.
Full Text FIELD OF THE DISCLOSURE
[001] The present disclosure relates generally to wireless
communications, and more particularly to radio resource negotiation in
wireless communications networks, for example, data channel requests and
assignments in cellular communications networks, and methods.
BACKGROUND OF THE DISCLOSURE
[002] In wireless data networks, mobile stations must generally request
a data channel assignment before transmitting data. In the CDMA 2000
protocol, for example, the mobile station (MS) requests a data channel
assignment by sending a Supplemental Channel Request Message (SCRM) to
the network indicating how much data the MS has in its buffer. The channel
assignment message from the network in the CDMA 2000 protocol is a
Supplemental Channel Assignment Message (SCAM) or an Enhanced
Supplemental Channel Assignment Message (ESCAM), which includes more
information. The E/SCAM includes a scheduling period over which the MS
may transmit data at an assigned data rate. In the existing CDMA 2000
protocol, the data channel request and assignment messaging occurs at Layer
3 in the architecture.
[003] Tn the 3rd Generation Partnership Project 2 (3GPP2), Technical
Specification Group C (TSG-C) Work Group 3 (WG3) has proposed an
alternative data scheduling and rate control scheme including overhead
channels that may replace the existing E/SCAM. In prior art FIG. 1, under the
WG3 proposal, in response to a request message 110 from the MS on the


reverse link (RL), the network transmits a scheduling (grant) message 120
on a forward link (FL) Grant Channel (F-GCH). The grant message assigns
a data rate, e.g. 76.8 kbits/s, for the MS to transmit one encoder packet.
Thereafter, upon successfully transmitting the encoder packet, the MS may
continue to transmit data subject to a rate control command sent by the
network on the forward link. The rate control command permits the
network to adjust the data rate up or down one step at a time, e.g., 1 bit per
10ms frame. The rate control command is sent prior to the frame whose rate
it will control. In FIG. 1, the rate control command (RC) 130 sent during
frame 140 controls the rate on future frame 142, RC 132 sent during frame
142 controls the rate of frame 144, etc. In the proposed scheme, the data rate
may be maintained from one frame to the next.
[004] An alternative proposal by 3GPP2 TSG-C WG3 is a modified
grant message having an additional bit to disable the rate control command
after transmitting one encoder packet. The effect of disabling the rate
command enables the network to limit the data channel assignment to the
one encoder packet. Thus, the MS must request a new data channel
assignment for transmitting packets in addition to the original encoder
packet.
[005] In the existing CDMA 2000 data channel assignment protocol,
the channel assignment is for a fixed period starting at a specified time. In
the TSG-C WG3 proposals discussed above, the channel assignment is lost


when there is a gap in transmission. FIG. 1 illustrates loss of the channel
assignment upon completion of the transmission of data in frame 144, e.g.,
when the MS buffer is emptied, or upon discontinuous transmission (DTX),
e.g., for lack of sufficient transmission power due to channel fading. In FIG.
1, data transmission resumes in frame 146 only upon receipt of a new grant
122 in response to a new request 112 transmitted by the MS on the reverse
link. Cumulative channel assignment negotiation generally has an adverse
impact on reverse and forward link capacity and may result latency. The
CDMA 2000 protocol permits the MS to transmit data without a channel
assignment, but the data rate is relatively low, on the theory that the
network has inadequate forewarning, which is necessary to allocate
resources to accommodate the transmission.
[006] The various aspects, features and advantages of the disclosure
will become more fully apparent to those having ordinary skill in the art
upon careful consideration of the following Detailed Description thereof
with the accompanying drawings described below.
BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE ACCOMPANYING DRAWINGS
[007] FIG. 1 illustrates a prior art data channel request and usage
scheme.


[008] FIG. 2 illustrates an exemplary wireless communications
network.
[009] FIG. 3 is an exemplary process diagram.
[0010] FIG. 4 is an exemplary radio resource assignment message.
[0011] FIG. 5 is an exemplary radio resource request and usage
scheme.
DETAILED DESCRIPTION
[0012] FIG. 2 is an exemplary wireless communications network 200
comprising a plurality of base stations 210 communicably coupled to a
controller 220. A wireless communications device 230 communicates with
others devices via one or more base stations when connected to the network.
The exemplary network 200 is also coupled to a data server 240, usually by a
gateway not illustrated but known in the art, thus providing data services to
wireless communications devices in the network. In one embodiment, the
wireless communications network is a CDMA 2000 network, although in
other embodiments the network conforms to some other communications
protocols, for example, 3rd Generation Partnership Project (3GPP) Universal
Mobile Telephone System (UMTS) wireless communications W-CDMA
communications systems, among others.


[0013] Generally, the communications network allocates radio
resources to wireless communications devices in the network. In FIG. 2, for
example, one of the base stations 210 serving the wireless communications
device 230 assigns radio resources, for example, a data channel assignment
and possibly a data rate, to the wireless communications device 230. In
some embodiments, the radio resource assignment is made in response to a
radio resource request from the wireless communications device, although
in other embodiments the request may be implied rather than explicit.
[0014] In the exemplary process diagram 300 of FIG. 3, at block 310, a
wireless communications device requests a radio resource assignment, for
example, a data channel assignment, a dedicated resource, etc. As suggest
above, the radio resource assignment request may be implied. In the
schematic communications diagram 500 of FIG. 5, the wireless device
transmits a request 510 to the network on the reverse link (RL) in the
exemplary CDMA 2000 application. In other communications protocols the
link on which the wireless device communicates is known by another name,
for example, an "uplink" in some WCDMA wireless communications
protocols.
[0015] In FIG. 3, at block 320, the communications network transmits a
radio resource assignment to a wireless communications device, usually but
not necessarily, in response to a radio resource assignment request. In one
embodiment, the radio resource assignment is communicated to the


wireless communications device in a radio resource assignment, or grant,
message, discussed further below. In FIG. 5, the network responds to the
radio resource request 510 with a radio resource grant 520 on the forward
link (FL), also referred in some communications protocols as a "downlink".
[0016] FIG. 4 illustrates an exemplary radio resource assignment
message 400 including, in some embodiments, a header portion 410, and a
radio resource assignment portion 420, for example, an encrypted data bit
field. In the exemplary embodiment where the radio resource assignment is
a data channel assignment, the assigiiment message 400 may include, in at
least some embodiments, a data rate, or related parameter, assignment field.
In FIG. 4, the data rate assignment is also specified in data field 420 of the
message. In other embodiments where the message includes a data rate, the
data rate may be encoded in a separate field. The format of the exemplary
message in FIG. 4 is not specific to any particular communications protocol,
and is not intended to be limiting. The radio resource assignment and any
data rate assignment information included in the message will generally be
defined or encoded pursuant a particular communications messaging
protocol.
[0017] In some embodiments of the disclosure, the network also
transmits radio resource assignment time-out information to the wireless
communications device, as illustrated at block 330 in FIG. 3. In one
embodiment, the radio resource assignment time-out information specifies a


duration during which the radio resource assignment to the wireless
communications device remains valid after the wireless communications
device discontinues communication on the assigned radio resource. The
resource assignment is invalid after the time-out period.
[0018] In one embodiment, illustrated in FIG. 4, the radio resource
time-out information is included in a time-out duration field 430 in the radio
resource assignment message 400, along with the channel and any data rate
assignment. Thus radio resource assignment and the radio resource time-
out information may be transmitted to the wireless device concurrently in
the same message. In other embodiments, however, the radio resource
assignment and the time-out information may be transmitted to the wireless
device in separate messages. In the exemplary CDMA 2000 application, for
example, the channel assignment may be communicated in a radio resource
assignment message and the time-out information may be communicated
separately in a Layer 3 message.
[0019] In one embodiment, the radio resource assignment time-out
information is one of a plurality of time-out durations or intervals defined
or encoded by one or more bits communicated to the wireless
communications device. Generally, the network selects the radio resource
time-out interval as a function of one or more variables. In one
embodiment, for example, the interval is based on system load and/or load
variability. That is, the more load room in the system and the slower the
load changes, the larger the grant time-out value. In another embodiment,

the radio resource time-out interval is based on the amount of reserve
power, or headroom, at the wireless communications device. Alternatively,
the interval may be based on the type of traffic and/or quality of service
(QoS). For example, subscribers with a higher quality of service may be
provided a longer time-out interval to allow more time to wait for a packet
before removing the radio resource assignment.
[0020] In embodiments, where the radio resource time-out interval is
defined by a single bit, the time-out interval may assume one of two
different values, for example, a default duration interval and a zero
duration. In another embodiment where the time-out period is defined by a
single bit, the time-out period assumes a default value that remains fixed in
one bit state and in the other bit state the time-out value assumes a default
value that is or may be updated by another message, for example, by a
Layer 3 message.
[0021] Table I below illustrates another particular example.



In Table I, when the time-out bit is set to "0" the radio resource grant
expires after the MS transmits a single frame. According to this scheme,
with reference to FIG. 5, the radio resource assignment assigned in grant 520
expires upon completion of the transmission of frame 530 when the time-out
bit is set to "0" as in Table I.
[0022] In Table I, when the time-out bit is set to "1", the time-out
duration is set to some default value and the time-out period begins when
the wireless communications device discontinues communication on the
radio resource, for example, upon discontinuing transmission (DTX) or
when the data buffer is emptied. Thus when the time-out bit is set to "1",
the radio resource assignment is valid so long as transmission gaps do not
exceed the radio resource time-out period. In another embodiment, one or
more time-out period values may be stored at the wireless device, and
selected when the time-out bit is set to "1", wherein the selection is based on
system parameters, as described above.
[0023] Alternatively, the radio resource time-out interval may be
defined by 2 or more bits mapped to a practical range of time-out intervals
as illustrate in Table II below. The exemplary time-out period begins when
the wireless device terminates communication, for example, discontinues
transmission.


According to Table II, when the time-out bits are set to "00", the MS must
resume communication on the assigned radio resource within 1 frame
period. When the time-out bits are set to "01", the MS must resume
communication on the assigned radio resource within 4 frame periods, etc.
With 3 bits, the range could be extended to 256 frames. Other values could
also be used alternatively.
[0023] In FIG. 3, at block 340, the wireless device communications
communicates on the radio resource assigned by the network in the radio
resource assignment, for example, the wireless device transmits data on the
assigned data channel at the assigned data rate.
[0024] In FIG. 5, assuming that the time-out interval is greater than 1
frame, the radio resource assignment assigned by grant 520 remains valid
during the frame interval 560 during which transmission is interrupted, for


example, due to a data gap, after transmitting data in frames 530, 540 and
550. The wireless device is able to resume transmission of data in frame 570,
after the interval 560, without requesting a new radio resource assignment,
since the frame interval 560 is less than the radio resource time-out interval.
Similarly, the wireless device is able to resume sending data in frame 590
after a fading 582 induced transmission interruption in frame 580 without
requesting a new radio resource assigiiment, provided the DTX interval 580
is less than the time-out interval. In either case, of the transmission
discontinuity 560 or 580 is greater that the time-out interval, the wireless
device must request a new radio resource assignment before resuming the
transmission of frames 570 and 590.
[0025] In one embodiment, the data rate at which communications are
resumed, in the absence of requesting a new radio resource assignment, is
not more than the rate at which commimications last occurred. In FIG. 5, for
example, rate at which transmission resumes in frames 570 and 590 does not
exceed the data rate in previous frames 550 and 570, respectively.
[0026] The use of a radio resource time-out interval enables the
network to automatically remove a radio resource assignment when the
wireless device to which the resource was assigned fails to communicate,
e.g., transmit, for a predetermined time interval, for example, one or more
frames. The time-out interval also enables the network to preserve the radio
resource assignment when there are short interruption or gaps in the


communications of the wireless communications device, thus reducing the
signaling tliat would be otherwise be required to request and assign a new
radio resource to the wireless device. In addition, by enabling the network
to dynamically select the radio resource time-out interval, the network may
adjust the capacity reserved for the wireless device based on loading
conditions and/or quality of service considerations, as suggested above. For
example, in heavy loading situations, or when the channel is changing
rapidly, the duration of the grant time-out may be reduced. And in lightly
loaded conditions, or where a higher quality of service is required, larger
time-out intervals may be provided. Also, when the wireless
communications device has knowledge of the time-out interval, the device
may intelligently select transmission times within the window allowed to
avoid deep fade, which will reduce power consumption.
[0027] The radio resource time-out interval of the instant disclosure
may also complement existing and proposed radio resource assignment
schemes. In FIG. 5, for example, the network sends rate control (RC)
commands 522 on the forward link to adjust the data rate assigned at the
time of the radio resource assignment.
[0028] While the present disclosure and what the best modes of the
inventions have been described in a manner establishing possession thereof
by the inventors and enabling those of ordinary skill in the art to make and
use the same, it will be understood and appreciated tliat there are many


equivalents to the exemplary embodiments disclosed herein and that
modifications and variations may be made thereto without departing from
the scope and spirit of the inventions, which are to be limited not by the
exemplary embodiments but by the appended claims.

We claim:
1. A method in a wireless communications network, the method comprising:
transmitting a radio resource assignment to a wireless communications device;
transmitting radio resource assignment time-out information to the wireless communications
device.
the radio resource assignment time-out information having one of at least two possible states.
a first state specifying a first duration during which the radio resource assignment to the
wireless communications device remains valid after the wireless communications device
discontinues communication on the radio resource assigned,
a second state specifying a second duration during which the radio resource
assignment to the wireless communications device remains valid after the wireless communications
device discontinues communication on the radio resource assigned.
2. The method as claimed in claim 1, wherein transmitting the radio resource assignment time-
out information involves transmitting at least one bit specifying either the first duration or the second
duration
3. The method as claimed in claim 1, which involves transmitting the radio resource assignment
and the radio resource assignment time-out information in a single message.
4. The method as claimed in claim 1, which involves indicating the time-out duration of the
radio resource assignment to the wireless communications device in terms of frames.
5. The method as claimed in claim 1, which involves selecting the first or second radio resource
assignment time-out duration based on either a wireless communications network load or a wireless
communications network load variability.
6. The method as claimed in claim 1, which involves selecting the first or second radio resource
assignment duration based on either a reserve power of the wireless communications device or a
quality of service of the wireless communications device.

7. A method in a wireless communications device, the method comprising:
receiving a radio resource assignment;
receiving radio resource assignment time-out information,
the radio resource assignment time-out information indicating either a first state or a second
state,
the first state indicating a first duration during which the radio resource assignment is valid
after the wireless communications device discontinues communicating on the assigned radio
resource,
the second state indicating a second duration during which the radio resource assignment is
valid after the wireless communications device discontinues communicating on the assigned radio
resource.
8. The method as claimed in claim 7, which involves
receiving the radio resource assignment in response to a request,
communicating on the radio resource assigned,
discontinuing communication in the radio resource assigned.
resuming communications on the radio resource assigned within the radio resource
assignment time-out duration without requesting a new radio resource assignment.
9. The method as claimed in claim 8, which involves resuming communications on the radio
resource assigned at a data rate not greater than a data rate occurring when the communication was
discontinued.
10. The method as claimed in claim 7, which involves
receiving the radio resource assignment in response to a request,
communicating on the radio resource assigned,
discontinuing communications on the radio resource assigned,
requesting a new radio resource assignment in the event of data communications being not
resumed within the radio resource assignment time-out duration.
11. The method as claimed in claim 7, which involves beginning the duration in the event of the
wireless communications device discontinuing communication on the radio resource assigned.
12. The method as claimed in claim 7, which involves
requesting the radio resource assignment.

receiving the radio resource assignment in response to the request, the radio resource
assignment comprising a data channel assignment.
transmitting on the channel assigned,
discontinuing transmission on the channel assigned,
resuming transmission on the channel assigned within the radio resource assignment time-out
duration without requesting a new radio resource assignment,
requesting a new radio resource assignment in the event of transmission being not resumed on
the channel assigned within the radio resource assignment time-out duration.
13. The method as claimed in claim 7, which involves selecting transmission times based on the
radio resource assignment time-out information.
14. The method as claimed in claim 7, which involves avoiding deep fade by selecting
transmission times based on the radio resource assignment time-out information.
15. A wireless communication network infrastructure entity configured to transmit a message for
transmission to a wireless communications device, the message comprising:
a radio resource time-out interval bit having either a first state or a second state,
in the first state, the radio resource time-out interval bit specifying a first duration during
which a radio resource assignment is valid after a wireless communications device to which the radio
resource is assigned discontinues communicating on the assigned radio resource,
in the second state, the radio resource time-out interval bit specifying a second duration
during which a radio resource assignment is valid after a wireless communications device to which
the radio resource is assigned discontinues communicating on the assigned radio resource.
16. The wireless network infrastructure entity as claimed in claim 15, wherein the message is a
radio resource assignment message comprising a channel assignment.
17. The wireless network infrastructure entity as claimed in claim 16,wherein the radio resource
assignment message comprises a data rate assignment.
18. The method as claimed in claim 1, which involves
indicating with the first state that the first duration expires upon transmission of a specified
number of frames.

indicating with the second state that the second duration expires after an interval specified in
another message.
19. The method as claimed in claim 7, which involves
indicating with the first state that the first duration expires upon transmission of a specified
number of frames by the wireless communications device.
indicating with the second state that the second duration expires after an interval specified in
another message received by the wireless communications device.
20. The wireless network infrastructure entity as claimed in claim 15, wherein
in the first state, the first duration is a single frame.
in the second state, the second duration is a number of frames specified in another message.

Documents:

00278-kolnp-2006-abstract.pdf

00278-kolnp-2006-claims.pdf

00278-kolnp-2006-description complete.pdf

00278-kolnp-2006-drawings.pdf

00278-kolnp-2006-form-1.pdf

00278-kolnp-2006-form-3.pdf

00278-kolnp-2006-form-5.pdf

00278-kolnp-2006-international publication.pdf

278-KOLNP-2006-(11-04-2012)-ASSIGNMENT.pdf

278-KOLNP-2006-(11-04-2012)-CORRESPONDENCE.pdf

278-KOLNP-2006-(11-04-2012)-FORM-16.pdf

278-KOLNP-2006-(11-04-2012)-PA-CERTIFIED COPIES.pdf

278-KOLNP-2006-ABSTRACT 1.1.pdf

278-KOLNP-2006-ABSTRACT.pdf

278-KOLNP-2006-AMANDED CLAIMS.pdf

278-kolnp-2006-assignment.pdf

278-KOLNP-2006-CANCELLED PAGES.pdf

278-KOLNP-2006-CLAIMS 1.1.pdf

278-KOLNP-2006-CORRESPONDENCE 1.1.pdf

278-KOLNP-2006-CORRESPONDENCE-1.1.pdf

278-KOLNP-2006-CORRESPONDENCE-1.2.pdf

278-kolnp-2006-correspondence-1.3.pdf

278-KOLNP-2006-CORRESPONDENCE.pdf

278-KOLNP-2006-DESCRIPTION (COMPLETE) 1.1.pdf

278-KOLNP-2006-DESCRIPTION (COMPLETE).pdf

278-KOLNP-2006-DRAWINGS 1.1.pdf

278-KOLNP-2006-DRAWINGS.pdf

278-KOLNP-2006-EXAMINATION REPORT REPLY RECIEVED 1.1.PDF

278-kolnp-2006-examination report.pdf

278-KOLNP-2006-FORM 1.pdf

278-kolnp-2006-form 13-1.1.pdf

278-KOLNP-2006-FORM 13.pdf

278-kolnp-2006-form 18-1.1.pdf

278-kolnp-2006-form 18.pdf

278-KOLNP-2006-FORM 2 1.1.pdf

278-KOLNP-2006-FORM 2.pdf

278-KOLNP-2006-FORM 3 1.1.pdf

278-kolnp-2006-form 3.pdf

278-kolnp-2006-form 5.pdf

278-KOLNP-2006-FORM-27.pdf

278-kolnp-2006-gpa.pdf

278-kolnp-2006-granted-abstract.pdf

278-kolnp-2006-granted-claims.pdf

278-kolnp-2006-granted-description (complete).pdf

278-kolnp-2006-granted-drawings.pdf

278-kolnp-2006-granted-form 1.pdf

278-kolnp-2006-granted-form 2.pdf

278-kolnp-2006-granted-specification.pdf

278-kolnp-2006-international publication.pdf

278-kolnp-2006-international search report.pdf

278-kolnp-2006-others-1.1.pdf

278-KOLNP-2006-OTHERS.pdf

278-kolnp-2006-pa.pdf

278-kolnp-2006-pct priority document notification.pdf

278-kolnp-2006-pct request form.pdf

278-KOLNP-2006-PETITION UNDER RULE 137.pdf

278-kolnp-2006-reply to examination report-1.1.pdf

278-KOLNP-2006-REPLY TO EXAMINATION REPORT.pdf

abstract-00278-kolnp-2006.jpg


Patent Number 247524
Indian Patent Application Number 278/KOLNP/2006
PG Journal Number 16/2011
Publication Date 22-Apr-2011
Grant Date 13-Apr-2011
Date of Filing 07-Feb-2006
Name of Patentee MOTOROLA, INC.
Applicant Address 1303, EAST ALGONQUIN ROAD, SCHAUMBURG, ILLINOIS
Inventors:
# Inventor's Name Inventor's Address
1 REED, JOHN DOUGLAS 1101, BRIARCLIFF DRIVE, ARLINGTON, TX 76012
2 BI, HAO 1559, HUNTER DRIVE, #2C, WHEELING, IL 60090
PCT International Classification Number H04B
PCT International Application Number PCT/US2004/028361
PCT International Filing date 2004-08-31
PCT Conventions:
# PCT Application Number Date of Convention Priority Country
1 10/662,256 2003-09-15 U.S.A.