Title of Invention

"AN AIR CLEANER STRUCTURE IN TWO-WHEELED MOTOR VEHICLES"

Abstract An air cleaner structure in a two-wheeled motor vehicle having a head pipe, a main frame extending backwardly downward from the head pipe, an engine mounted to a lower portion of the main frame , and an air cleaner disposed above the engine, characterized in that said air cleaner has a pair of right and left intake ducts provided in an upper portion thereof so as to be inclined in a V shape in a sandwiching relation to said main frame when the air cleaner is seen from a rear portion of a vehicle body.
Full Text The present invention relates to an air cleaner structure in a two-wheeled motor vehicle.
The present invention relates to an air cleaner structure in a two-wheeled motor vehicle suitable for attaining the reduction in size of an air cleaner.
BACKGROUND ART
As an air cleaner structure in a two-wheeled motor vehicle there is known, for example, one disclosed in Japanese Utility Model Registration No. 2513803 entitled "Air Cleaner for Two-wheeled Motor Vehicle Engine." This air cleaner is disposed below a main frame and in front of and above an engine. This air cleaner is composed of a front half and a rear half. A duct portion is projected from an upper portion of the rear half and an air intake port is formed in an upper end of the duct portion so as to face the inside of a reinforcing gusset.
As in the above conventional technique, if the duct portion is projected upward, the air cleaner becomes large-sized, and the duct portion is compelled to be disposed sideways of the main frame so as to avoid interference with the main frame. Consequently, it becomes difficult to mount the air cleaner to the vehicle body and the air cleaner mounting position is limited. Besides, an increase in size of the air cleaner is disadvantageous in point of ensuring a storage place for the air cleaner before mounting to the vehicle body and also in point of handling during conveyance.
Further, projecting the duct portion upward permits easy interference of the duct portion with a front cover, thus requiring the front cover to be positioned high for preventing its interference with the duct portion. In this case, however, the rider's foot is apt to interfere with the front cover when getting on and off the vehicle.
DISCLOSURE OF THE INVENTION It is an object of the present invention to attain the reduction in size of an air cleaner in an air cleaner structure for a two-wheeled motor vehicle, thereby facilitate mounting of the air cleaner to a vehicle body, enhance the freedom of arrangement, further facilitate ensuring a storage place before mounting and facilitate handling during conveyance, and lower the height of a body cover disposed at an upper position, thereby making it easier for a rider to get on and off the vehicle.
In the first aspect of the present invention, for achieving the above-mentioned object, in a two-wheeled motor vehicle wherein a main frame is extended backwardly downward from a head pipe, an engine is mounted to a lower portion of the main frame, and an air cleaner is disposed above the engine, there is provided an air cleaner structure characterized in that a pair of right and left intake ducts are provided in an upper portion of the air cleaner so as to be inclined in a generally V shape in a sandwiching relation to the main frame when the air cleaner is seen from a rear portion of a vehicle body.
Thus, in one aspect of the invention, intake ducts are inclined in a generally V shape in a sandwiching relation to
a main frame when the air cleaner is seen from a rear portion of a vehicle body. According to this construction, the height and size of the air cleaner can be reduced. Consequently, the air cleaner can be installed easily, for example to a carburetor side, from between the main frame and the engine. Besides, it is possible to increase the freedom of arrangement of the air cleaner for the vehicle body. Moreover, the space for storage of the air cleaner before mounting to the vehicle body can be made small and it is possible to facilitate handling of the air cleaner during conveyance.
Further, since the height of the air cleaner is reduced, it is possible to reduce the height of a body cover disposed above the air cleaner, whereby a rider can get on and off the vehicle more easily.
In the second aspect of the present invention, the intake ducts are each formed in S shape in section by combining an air cleaner cover which covers an opening of an air cleaner case with the air cleaner case in such a manner that recesses formed in the air cleaner case and recesses formed in the air cleaner cover are displaced from each other.
In this way, intake ducts S-shaped in section are formed by recesses formed on the air cleaner case side and the air cleaner cover side, respectively. According to this construction, the number of components used can be reduced in comparison with forming intake ducts separately from the air cleaner case and the air cleaner cover and it is possible to omit the intake ducts mounting step, thus permitting reduction of the air cleaner manufacturing cost.
Moreover, the shape of a mold used can be simplified in
comparison with the case where intake ducts are made integral with the air cleaner case or the air cleaner cover.
Further, since the intake ducts are formed in S shape in section, the length of the intake ducts can be made long and hence it is possible to suppress an engine intake noise.
In the third aspect of the present invention, the air cleaner cover is extended above the air cleaner case to form extended portions and apertures of the intake duct are formed in the extended portions substantially on diagonal lines.
Since intake duct apertures are formed substantially diagonally in the extended portions, for example if a connecting tube connected to a carburetor is provided in the air cleaner case, the length of each intake duct can be set large from the air cleaner cover up to the air cleaner case side and hence the intake duct length can be adjusted easily for the reduction of intake noise.
With the extended portions, moreover, it is possible to enhance the waterproofness and reinforce the intake duct apertures. Further, since the intake duct apertures are formed substantially diagonally in the extended portions, it is possible to reduce the size of the extended portions while ensuring a predetermined aperture area of each intake duct aperture.
In the fourth aspect of the present invention, the intake ducts are formed below the position where the air cleaner is mounted to the main frame.
Thus, since the intake ducts are formed below the air cleaner mounting position, the intake ducts do not project above the air cleaner mounting position and therefore
components such as a body cover attached to the main frame can be prevented from interfering with the intake ducts.
In the fifth aspect of the present invention, upright walls are formed respectively on edges of the apertures of the intake ducts to prevent the entry of rainwater into the intake ducts.
Thus, the entry of rainwater into the intake ducts can be prevented by such upright walls formed along edges of the intake duct apertures. Besides, with such a simple structure as forming upright walls integrally with the air cleaner cover, it is possible to prolong the period until replacement of an air filter element disposed within the air cleaner.
Accordingly, the present invention relates to an air cleaner structure in a two-wheeled motor vehicle having a head pipe, a main frame extending backwardly downward from the head pipe, an engine mounted to a lower portion of the main frame, and an air cleaner disposed above the engine, characterized in that said air cleaner has a pair of right and left intake ducts provided in an upper portion thereof so as to be inclined in a V shape in a sandwiching relation to said main frame when the air cleaner is seen from a rear portion of a vehicle body.
BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE ACCOMPANYING DRAWINGS
Fig. 1 is a side view of a two-wheeled motor vehicle employing an air cleaner structure according to the present invention;
Fig. 2 is a side view illustrating the air cleaner structure;
Fig. 3 is an exploded perspective view illustrating the air cleaner structure;
Fig. 4 is a perspective view illustrating the air cleaner structure;
Fig. 5 is a rear view illustrating the air cleaner structure;
Fig. 6 is a view as seen in the direction of arrow 6 in Fig. 3;
Fig. 7 is a view as seen in the direction of arrow 7 in Fig. 3;
Fig. 8 is a view as seen in the direction of arrow 8 in
Fig. 3;
Fig. 9 is a first operation diagram explanatory of the operation of the air cleaner structure;
Fig. 10 is a second operation diagram explanatory of the operation of the air cleaner structure;
Fig. 11 is a third operation diagram explanatory of the operation of the air cleaner structure; and
Fig. 12 is a sectional view taken along line 12-12 in Fig. 5.
BEST MODE FOR CARRYING OUT THE INVENTION
Fig. 1 is a side view of a two-wheeled motor vehicle which adopts an air cleaner structure embodying the present invention. The two-wheeled motor vehicle, indicated at 10, is provided with a body frame 13 which comprises a main frame 11 and rear frames 12 attached to a rear portion of the main frame 11. A front portion of the main frame 11 is secured to a head pipe 15, a front fork 16 is connected steerably to the head pipe 15, a front wheel 17 is connected to a lower end of the front fork 16, a handlebar 18 is secured to an upper end of the front fork 16, an engine 21 is mounted to the rear portion of the main frame 11, swing arms 22 are also attached to the main frame rear portion swingably, a rear wheel 23 is connected to rear ends of the swing arms 22, lower ends of a pair of rear cushion units 24 (the numeral 24 on the inner side is not shown) are secured to rear ends of the swing arms 22, while upper ends of the rear cushion units 24 are secured to the rear frames 12, a fuel tank 25 and a seat 26 are mounted on the rear frames 12, and an air cleaner 2 7 embodying the present invention is disposed above the engine
21.
The numeral 31 denotes a head lamp, numeral 32 denotes a front cover, numeral 33 denotes a leg shield, numeral 34 denotes a front fender, 35 a side cover, 36 a side stand, 37 a main stand, 38 a tail lamp, and 41 a rear fender.
Fig. 2 is a side view explaining the air cleaner structure embodying the present invention. An upper portion of the air cleaner 2 7 is fixed to the main frame 11 with a pair of bolts 51 (the numeral 51 on the inner side is not shown) and a carburetor 52 is secured to a lower portion of the air cleaner 27 through a connecting tube which will be described later and is connected to the engine 21 (see Fig. 1) through an intake pipe 53.
The leg shields 33 are disposed in front of both legs of a rider on the vehicle and above both air cleaner 27 and main frame 11. Numeral 54 denotes a mounting portion of each leg shield 33 for the main frame 11.
Fig. 3 is an exploded perspective view for explaining the air cleaner structure embodying the invention. The air cleaner 27 comprises an air cleaner case 55, an air cleaner cover 57 which covers an opening 56 formed on a vehicle body front side (the direction indicated by a white arrow (front) in the figure corresponds to the front side of the vehicle body; this will also be the case in the following), an air filter element 58 interposed between the air cleaner case 55 and the air cleaner cover 57, a first seal member 61 for sealing between a peripheral edge portion of the air cleaner cover 57 and that of the air filter element 58, a second seal member 62 for sealing between the peripheral edge portion of
the air filer element 58 and that of the air cleaner case 55, and a first drain tube 64 and a second drain tube 65 for the discharge of water separated from air in the air cleaner 27. Numerals 67 and 68 denote anti-dislodgment members for the first and second drain tubes 64, 65, respectively, numeral 71 denotes a machine screw, used in a plural number, for fixing the air cleaner cover 57 to the air cleaner case 55, numeral 72 denotes a connecting tube for communication between the interior of the air cleaner case 55 and the interior of the carburetor 52 (see Fig. 2), numeral 73 denotes a band member for fixing the connecting tube 72 to the carburetor 52, and numerals 74 and 75 denote a bolt and a nut, respectively, for clamping the band member 73.
Fig. 4 is a perspective view for explaining the air cleaner structure of this embodiment, in which the air cleaner 27 is seen from the side of the air cleaner case 55.
In the air cleaner 27, a pair of right and left extended portions 77, 78 are formed at an upper portion of the back of the air cleaner cover 57 and apertures 81 and 82 are formed in the extended portions 77 and 78, respectively, which apertures are of intake ducts to be described later, with upright walls 83 and 84 being formed along edges of the apertures 81 and 82, respectively.
The extended portions 77 and 78 are formed larger than the apertures 81, 82 and substantially diagonally of the extended portions 77, 78.
Since the extended portions 7 7 and 78 are thus formed larger than the apertures 81 and 82, it is possible to prevent the entry of rainwater, etc. from the front side of
the vehicle body into the apertures 81 and 82.
Numeral 86 denotes a secondary air discharge port formed in the air cleaner case 55 at a position behind the extended portion 77 to feed a secondary air from the air cleaner 27 to a discharge passage in the engine, numeral 87 denotes a blow-by gas inlet port for introducing blow-by gas into the air cleaner 2 7 from the engine, and numeral 88 denotes an air take-out port for feeding air to a slow system of the carburetor 52 (see Fig. 2).
Fig. 5 is a rear view for explaining the air cleaner structure of this embodiment, in which left and right intake ducts 121, 122 (the details thereof will be described later), including the apertures 81 and 82 formed in the air cleaner cover 57 (the apertures 81 and 82 are cross-hatched for easy understanding of their shape), are each inclined at an angle
of 6 with respect to a vertical line 82. For illustrating in what state the air cleaner 27 is mounted, the main frame 11, bolts 51 and leg shields 33 are also described in the figure.
As described above, by tilting the left and right intake ducts 121 and 122 for the suction of air into the air cleaner 27 it is possible to reduce the height of the air cleaner cover 57 and hence the height of the air cleaner 27.
The height of the air cleaner cover 57 may be further reduced by tilting the left and right intake ducts to a horizontal level. In this case, however, the width of the air cleaner cover becomes larger. On the other hand, in the present invention, the left and right intake ducts 121 and 122 are not tilted to a horizontal level, but are tilted preferably in the range of 0 = 45° to 75° , whereby the height
of the air cleaner cover 57 is made small and an increase in width of the air cleaner is suppressed; besides, the left and right intake ducts 121, 122 can be increased in length, as will be described later.
Fig. 6 is a view (rear view) as seen in the direction of arrow 6 in Fig. 3, in which the inside of the air cleaner cover 57 is seen.
The air cleaner cover 57 has the extended portions 77 and 78 which are extended upward, the apertures 81 and 82 formed respectively in the extended portions 7 7 and 7 8 substantially on diagonal lines, cover-side recesses 92 and 93 contiguous to the apertures 81 and 82, a cylindrical portion 94 projecting from a wall portion located between the cover-side recesses 92 and 93, and a first annular sealing groove 95 for fitting therein of the first seal member 61 (see Fig. 3). Numeral 96 denotes a first drain pipe for attachment thereto of the first drain tube 64 (see Fig. 3) and numerals 97 and 98 denote upper projections formed contiguously to and lower than the upright walls 83 and 84.
Fig. 7 is a view as seen in the direction of arrow 7 in Fig. 3. The air filter element 58 comprises a filter 101 for cleaning air and a frame 102 which supports the filter 101. On an edge of the frame 102 are formed a first annular projection 103 for abutment against the first seal member (see Fig. 3) and a second annular projection 104 (projecting on the back side of the frame 102) for abutment against the second seal member 62 (see Fig. 3), and an upper trapezoidal portion 102a having air passing holes 105 and 106 is formed at an upper portion of the frame 102. Numeral 107 denotes a
baffle plate projecting on the back side of the frame 102 and from below the filter 101 (the details of the baffle plate 107 will be described later). Numeral 108 denotes a rectilinear projection formed horizontally at a central upper end of the back of the frame 102 and numeral 109 denotes a connecting member provided between the air passing holes 105 and 106.
Fig. 8 is a view as seen in the direction of arrow 8 in Fig. 3, showing a front side of the air cleaner case 55.
The air cleaner case 55 is provided with a pair of right and left case-side recesses 111, 112 formed in an upper portion of the air cleaner case, an annular second sealing groove 113 for fitting therein of the second seal member 62 (see Fig. 3), an oil separating portion 114 of a labyrinth structure for separating oil from blow-by gas sucked in from the blow-by gas inlet port 87, and a tube mounting hole 115 for attachment thereto of the connecting tube 72 (see Fig. 4).
Numeral 116 denotes a blow-by gas discharge hole formed in the oil separating portion 114, numeral 117 denotes a second drain pipe for attachment thereto of the second drain tube 65 (see Fig. 3), numeral 118 denotes an upper groove for fitting therein of the upper projections 97 and 98 (see Fig. 6) of the air cleaner cover 57 (see Fig. 6) and the rectilinear projection 108 (see Fig. 7) of the air filter element 58 (see Fig. 7), and numerals 119 and 120 denote mounting portions for mounting the air cleaner case to the main frame 11 (see Fig. 2).
The operation of the air cleaner structure constructed as above will be described below.
Fig. 9 is a first operation diagram for explaining the operation of the air cleaner structure of this embodiment, showing how to assemble the air cleaner, particularly how to mount the air filter element 58 to the air cleaner case 55 through the second seal member 62.
First, the second seal member 62 is fitted in the second sealing groove 113 of the air cleaner case 55 and then the second annular projection 104 is fitted in the second sealing groove 113 while allowing the second annular projection 104 of the air filter element 58 to come into abutment against the second seal member 62.
An upper portion of the second seal member 62 seal the portion below the case-side recesses 111 and 112 of the air cleaner case 55 and also below the air passing holes 105 and 106 of the air filter element 58.
Fig. 10 is a second operation diagram for explaining the operation of the air cleaner structure of this embodiment, showing how to assemble the air cleaner, especially how to mount the air cleaner cover 57 through the first seal member 61 shown in Fig. 10 to the air cleaner case 55 containing the air filter element 58 described in connection with Fig. 9.
First, the first seal member 61 is fitted in the first sealing groove 95 of the air cleaner cover 57 and then the air cleaner cover 57 is mounted to the air cleaner case 55 (see Fig. 9) while allowing the first seal member 61 to come into abutment against the first annular projection 103 of the air filter element 58.
Fig. 11 is a third operation diagram for explaining the operation of the air cleaner structure of this embodiment,
illustrating successively an air flowing route within the air cleaner 27. The following description is provided in a disassembled state of the air cleaner 27 so as to permit easy understanding of the air flow. Air flows into the air cleaner 27 from the left and right apertures 81, 82, but since the air flow is symmetric right and left, a description will be directed to only the flow of air introduced from the left aperture 81. (Likewise, reference will be made below to only the associated components.)
First, air enters the air cleaner from the aperture 81 like arrow (D, then U-turns at the cover-side recess 92 like arrow ©, passes sideways of the upper trapezoidal portion 102a of the air filter element 58, then U-turns in the case-side recess 111 like arrow (3), passes through the air passing hole 105 of the air filter element 58, then U-turns while flowing down along an inner surface of the air cleaner cover 57 like arrow ®, passes through the filter 101 of the air filter element 58 like arrow (5), flows through the air cleaner case 55 like arrow ©, and flows out to the exterior of the air cleaner 27 through the connecting tube attached to the tube mounting hole 115.
Fig. 12 is a sectional view taken along line 12-12 in Fig. 5. A description will first be given about the construction of each component. The aperture 81 and the cover-side recess 92 both formed in the air cleaner cover 57, the case-side recess 111 formed in the air cleaner case 55, and air passing hole 105 formed in the air filter element 58 constitute the left intake duct 121.
Likewise, the aperture 82 (see Fig. 6) and the cover-
side recess 93 (see Fig. 6) both formed in the air cleaner cover 57, the case-side recess 112 (see Fig. 8) formed in the air cleaner case 55, and the air passing hole 106 (see Fig. 7) formed in the air filter element 58 (see Fig. 7) constitute the right intake duct 122 (see Fig. 11).
The cylindrical portion 94 of the air cleaner cover 57, at the tip thereof, presses the frame 102 of the air filter element 58.
Numeral 124 denotes an L-shaped wall formed on an outer surface of the air cleaner cover 57 and having an L-shaped section, numeral 125 denotes a dirty side (i.e., a chamber through which uncleaned air flows) of the air cleaner 27, and numeral 126 denotes a clean side (i.e., a chamber through while cleaned air flows) of the air cleaner 27.
Next, a description will be given below about the operation of each component in Fig. 12.
First, the flow of air will be described in association with that shown in Fig. 11. The arrow numbers shown in Fig. 12 correspond to those in Fig. 11.
First, air enters the air cleaner from the aperture 81 like arrow (1), then meanders in S shape through the left intake duct 121 like arrows (2) and (3), then U-turns while flowing down along the inner surface of the air cleaner cover 57 like arrow (4), passes through the filter 101 of the air filter element 58 like arrow (5), flows through the air cleaner case 55 like arrow (6), then passes through the connecting tube 72 like arrow (7) and flows out to the exterior of the air cleaner 27.
When air flows through the above-mentioned route, water
(containing dust, etc.) contained in the air drops, on the dirty side 125, through the air cleaner cover 57 and flows out from the first drain pipe 9 6 provided at the lower end like arrow (8), while on the clean side 126 the water drops through the air cleaner case 55 and flows out from the second drain pipe 117 provided at the lower end like arrow (9).
The following description is now provided about the upright wall 83 formed on the edge of the aperture 81 and the L-shaped wall 124.
Since the upright wall 83 is formed in the aperture 81 of the air cleaner cover 57, rainwater 128 when dropping from above can be prevented from entering the left intake duct 121 directly from the aperture 81. The rainwater 128 flows along an outer surface of the air cleaner case 55.
Further, when rainwater 131 flows along an upper surface of the air cleaner cover 57 from the front side of the vehicle during vehicular running, the rainwater 131 can be blocked by the L-shaped wall 124 formed on the air cleaner cover 57 and hence can be prevented from flowing to the aperture 81 side.
Thus, the entry of rainwater into the air cleaner 27 can be surely prevented by both upright wall 83 and L-shaped wall 124.
As described above in connection with Figs. 1 and 5, according to the first aspect of the present invention, in the two-wheeled motor vehicle 10 wherein the main frame 11 is extended backwardly downward from the head pipe 15, the engine 21 is mounted to the lower portion of the main frame 11, and the air cleaner 27 is disposed above the engine 21, a
pair of left and right intake ducts 121, 122 of the air cleaner 27 are provided in the upper portion of the air cleaner so as to be inclined in a generally V shape in a sandwiching relation to the main frame 11 when the air cleaner 27 is seen from the rear portion of the vehicle body.
Since the left and right intake ducts 121, 122 are inclined so as to be generally V-shaped when the air cleaner 27 is seen from the rear portion of the vehicle body, the height of the air cleaner 27 can be reduced and hence the air cleaner can be small-sized.
Consequently, the air cleaner 27 can be easily mounted to, for example, the carburetor 52 (see Fig. 2) through the connecting tube (see Fig. 12) from between the main frame 11 and the engine 21. Besides, the freedom of arrangement of the air cleaner 27 for the vehicle body can be enhanced, so that the air cleaner can be disposed without difficulty and without interference with any other component. Moreover, the storage space for the air cleaner before mounting to the vehicle body can be reduced and it is possible to facilitate handling of the air cleaner during conveyance.
Further, the height of the air cleaner 27 becomes smaller, so that the body covers disposed above the air cleaner 27, e.g., leg shields 33, can be reduced in height, thus permitting the rider to get on and off the vehicle more easily.
According to the second aspect of the present invention, as described above in connection with Figs. 11 and 12, the intake ducts 121 and 122 are each formed in S shape in section by combining the air cleaner cover 57 which covers
the opening 56 of the air cleaner case 55 with the air cleaner case 55 in such a manner that the case-side recesses 111 and 112 formed in the air cleaner case 55 and the cover-side recesses 92 and 93 formed in the air cleaner cover 57 are displaced from each other.
For example, in comparison with the case where the intake ducts are formed separately from the air cleaner case and the air cleaner cover, the number of components used can be reduced and the mounting step for the intake ducts 121 and 122. Consequently, it is possible to reducing the cost for manufacturing the air cleaner 27.
Moreover, for example when the intake ducts are integral with the air cleaner case or the air cleaner cover, it is necessary that portions corresponding to intake duct apertures be formed in the mold for molding the air cleaner case or the air cleaner cover, thus resulting in that the shape of the mold becomes complicated. But in the construction according to the second feature of the present invention being considered, it suffices to form convex portions corresponding to the intake ducts 121 and 122 in the molds of the air cleaner case 55 and the air cleaner cover 57 respectively. Thus, the molds shape can be simplified and therefore the molds cost can be kept low.
Further, since the intake ducts 121 and 122 are formed in S shape in section, the length of the intake ducts 121 and 122 can be made large and therefore the intake noise of the engine 21 (see Fig. 1) can be damped more easily.
According to the third aspect of the present invention, as shown in Figs. 4 and 12, the air cleaner cover 57 is
extended above the air cleaner case 55 to form the extended portions 77 and 78 and the apertures 81 and 82 of the intake ducts 121 and 122 are formed in the extended portions 77 and 78 substantially on diagonal lines.
Since the apertures 81 and 82 of the intake ducts 121 and 122 are formed substantially diagonally of the extended portions 7 7 and 78, for example if the connecting tube 72 for connection to the carburetor 52 (see Fig. 2) is provided in the air cleaner case 55, the length of the left and right intake ducts 121, 122 can be set large from the air cleaner cover 57 up to the air cleaner case 55, thus making it possible to easily adjust the intake duct length for damping the intake noise.
Moreover, with the extended portions 77 and 78, rainwater or the like flowing from the front side of the vehicle body can be blocked and thus it is possible to prevent the entry of water into the apertures 81 and 82 and thereby possible to enhance the waterproofness of the air cleaner. Further, the apertures 81 and 82 can be reinforced by the extended portions 77 and 78.
Additionally, since the apertures 81 and 82 are formed substantially diagonally of the extended portions 77 and 78, the extended portions 77 and 78 can be reduced in size while ensuring a predetermined area of each of the apertures 81 and 82.
According to the fourth aspect of the present invention, as described above in connection with Fig. 5, the intake ducts 121 and 122 are formed below the mounting portions 119 and 120 of the air cleaner 27 for mounting to the main frame
11.
Since the intake ducts 121 and 122 do not project above the mounting portions 119 and 120, components such as a body cover (here the leg shields 33) secured to the main frame 11 can be prevented from interfering with the intake ducts 121 and 122.
According to the fifth aspect of the present invention, as described above in connection with Figs. 4, 5, and 12, the upright walls 83 and 84 are formed on the edges of the apertures 81 and 82, respectively, of the left and right intake ducts 121 and 122 to prevent the entry of rainwater into both ducts.
The entry of rainwater into the intake ducts 121 and 122 can be prevented by the upright walls 83 and 84 of the apertures 81 and 82 in the left and right intake ducts 121 and 122, and with such a simple structure of molding the upright walls 83 and 84 integrally with the air cleaner cover 57, it is possible to prolong the period until replacement of the air filter element 58 in the air cleaner 27.
In the present invention, the left and right intake ducts are inclined in a generally V shape when the air cleaner is seen from the rear portion of the vehicle body. In addition, the intake duct apertures and the upright walls of the apertures may be inclined backward and obliquely downward of the vehicle body.
INDUSTRIAL APPLICABILITY
In the cleaner structure of the present invention, a pair of right and left intake ducts are formed in an upper portion of the air cleaner in an inclined state so that the
intake ducts are generally V-shaped when the air cleaner is seen from the rear portion of the vehicle body. Therefore, the height of the air cleaner can be reduced, that is, the air cleaner can be small-sized. Consequently, the air cleaner can be mounted easily to the vehicle body, the freedom of arrangement increases, and it is possible to easily ensure a storage space for the air cleaner and easily handle the air cleaner during conveyance. Further, it is possible to lower the height of the body cover disposed above the air cleaner and thereby let the rider to get on and off the vehicle more easily. These points are advantageous to the two-wheeled motor vehicle.






WE CLAIMS :-
1. An air cleaner structure in a two-wheeled motor vehicle having a head pipe (15), a main frame (11) extending backwardly downward from the head pipe (15), an engine (21) mounted to a lower portion of the main frame (11), and an air cleaner (27) disposed above the engine (21), characterized in that said air cleaner (27) has a pair of right and left intake ducts (122, 121) provided in an upper portion thereof so as to be inclined in a V shape in a sandwiching relation to said main frame (11) when the air cleaner (27) is seen from a rear portion of a vehicle body.
2. An air cleaner structure in a two-wheeled motor vehicle as claimed in claim 1, wherein said intake ducts (122, 121) are each formed in an S shape in section by combining an air cleaner cover (57) which covers an opening (56) of an air cleaner case (55) with said air cleaner case (55) in such a manner that recesses (111, 112) formed in said air cleaner case (55) and recesses (92, 93) formed in said air cleaner cover (57) are displaced from each other.
3. An air cleaner structure in a two-wheeled motor vehicle as claimed in claim 2, wherein said air cleaner cover (57) is extended above said air cleaner case (55) to form extended portions (77, 78) and apertures (81, 82) of said intake ducts (121, 122) are formed in said extended portions (77, 78) on diagonal lines.
4. An air cleaner structure in a two-wheeled motor vehicle as claimed in claim 1, wherein said intake ducts (121, 122) are formed below the position where said air cleaner (27) is mounted to said main frame (11).
5. An air cleaner structure in a two-wheeled motor vehicle as claimed in claim 3, wherein upright walls (83, 84) are formed on edges of said apertures (81, 82) of the intake ducts (121, 122) to prevent the entry of rainwater into the intake ducts (121, 122).
6. An air cleaner structure in a two-wheeled motor vehicle substantially as hereinbefore described with reference to the accompanying drawings.

Documents:

2038-delnp-2003-abstract.pdf

2038-delnp-2003-claims.pdf

2038-delnp-2003-complete specification (as filed).pdf

2038-delnp-2003-complete specification (granted).pdf

2038-delnp-2003-correspondence-others.pdf

2038-delnp-2003-correspondence-po.pdf

2038-delnp-2003-description (complete).pdf

2038-delnp-2003-drawings.pdf

2038-delnp-2003-form-1.pdf

2038-delnp-2003-form-19.pdf

2038-delnp-2003-form-2.pdf

2038-delnp-2003-form-3.pdf

2038-delnp-2003-gpa.pdf

2038-delnp-2003-pct-210.pdf

2038-delnp-2003-petition-137.pdf

2038-delnp-2003-petition-138.pdf


Patent Number 247467
Indian Patent Application Number 2038/DELNP/2003
PG Journal Number 15/2011
Publication Date 15-Apr-2011
Grant Date 08-Apr-2011
Date of Filing 28-Nov-2003
Name of Patentee HONDA GIKEN KOGYO KABUSHIKI KAISHA
Applicant Address 1-1, MINAMI-AOYAMA 2-CHOME, MINATO-KU, TOKYO 107-8556 JAPAN.
Inventors:
# Inventor's Name Inventor's Address
1 YASUHIRO TAKADA C/O KABUSHIKI KAISHA HONDA GIJUTSU KENKYUSHO, 4-1, CHUO 1-CHOME, WAKO-SHI, SAITAMA 351-0113, JAPAN.
2 SHOICHIRO SATO C/O KABUSHIKI KAISHA HONDA GIJUTSU KENKYUSHO, 4-1, CHUO 1-CHOME, WAKO-SHI, SAITAMA 351-0113, JAPAN.
PCT International Classification Number F02M 35/024
PCT International Application Number PCT/JP01/05253
PCT International Filing date 2001-06-20
PCT Conventions:
# PCT Application Number Date of Convention Priority Country
1 PCT/JP01/05253 2001-06-20 PCT