Title of Invention

"A PROCESS FOR THE PREPARATION OF READY- TO -DRINK TAMARIND BEVERAGE HAVING IMPROVED STORAGE LIFE"

Abstract The present invention relates to a process for the preparation of ready -to- drink tamarind beverage having improved storage life. More specifically, it relates to a method for improving the taste and storage life of the tamarind drink when stored at ambient temperature. The process, in particular, describes the method of preparation of clarified tamarind beverage using a membrane-processing unit and subsequent pasteurization. The novelty of the process lies in the combined manner in which critical steps such as formulation of tamarind juice beverage, clarification of the beverage using Micro Filtration, incorporation of ascorbic acid and ginger oil/extracts, and pasteurization to obtain a high quality clear, ready to drink shelf stable tamarind beverage with acceptable quality attributes.
Full Text This invention relates to a process for the preparation of ready-to-drink tamarind beverage having improved storage life.
More specifically, it relates to a method for improving the taste and storage life of the tamarind drink when stored at ambient temperature. The process, in particular, describes the method of preparation of clarified tamarind beverage using a membrane-processing unit and subsequent pasteurization.
The tamarind (Tamarindus indica) is a leguminous evergreen tree native to India or Africa. The pulp is edible and has a pleasant taste and it contains around 13% tartaric acid (as a mixture of tartaric acid and potassium bitartarate), 5% pectin and 33% fruit sugar. Tamarind fruit has been used as a raw material for the manufacture of several products like tamarind juice concentrate, tartaric acid, pectin, tartarates and alcohols (Lewis et al., 1964; Wealth of India, 1976; Anon, 1982). The extract is used as in flavouring agent for sauces, chutneys, and curries to add acidity and enhance fruit flavours.
Tamarind juice is being consumed world wide in different forms. It has medicinal values for treating many illnesses. Fresh tamarind juice is usually prepared by separating the seeds and fibres manually from tamarind pulp, and the juice is extracted with water in the ratio of 1:7 at boiling temperature. Home scale production of tamarind drinks prepared from Tamarind pulp or pulp concentrate is only confined to home and not very popular in the market, which may be due to prolonged tartness taste on tongue after drink. Also, there is a tendency to prepare such drinks as when necessary at home.
Non-availability of suitable technology or standard formulation is one of the reasons why the tamarind beverages are not popular in the market. Moreover, sedimentation of pulp at the bottom of the bottled beverage during storage looks poor external appearance of the product to the consumers. Apart from homogenization of the juice, addition of suitable cloudifying agents into the fruit beverage is the usual approach to overcome this problem to some extent. Another approach is to remove the pulp completely by clarification method and to prepare clarified Ready-To-Drink beverages. In view of the importance of the tamarind
juice from nutritional and medicinal points, it was desirable to develop a process for preparation of shelf - stable, ready to drink tamarind beverage.
Reference may be made to a US patent No. 5474791, 1995 (Zablocki et al. 1995), wherein a process for preparation of beverages using tamarind extract and method of making such beverages is described. The main objective of this process was to use the tamarind extract as a replacement, at low levels, for the phosphoric, citric or other acids conventionally found in carbonated soft drinks, flavoured waters and iced teas.
Reference may be made to a US patent No. 5994533, 1999 (Kulkami et al., 2001), where in process for the recovery of tartaric acid from tamarind pulp is described.
Reference may be made to a US patent No. 6015699, 2000 (Patil et al., 2001), where in process for the production of alcohol from tamarind pulp is described
Reference may be made to a US patent No. 6316615, 2001 (Kulkami et al., 2001), where in process for the recovery of potassium bitartrate and pectin, sugars, fruit acids as by-products from tamarind pulp is described.
Literature status and patent search indicated that there has been no work on the preparation of fruit drink from clarified tamarind juice extracts obtained by membrane filtration techniques.
The main object of the present invention is to provide a process for the preparation of ready-to-drink shelf stable tamarind beverage, which obviates the drawbacks detailed above.
Another object of the present invention is to formulate a drink with reasonable tamarind juice extract.
Yet, another object of the present invention is to clarify the tamarind beverage using microfiltration technique.
Still, another object of the present invention is to bottle and pasteurize the clear tamarind beverage for shelf stability.
DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION
Accordingly, the present invention relates to a process for the preparation of ready-to-drink tamarind beverage having improved storage, comprising:
i separating seeds and fibres from tamarind pulp,
ii extracting of the tamarind juice is by boiling the pulp with water in
the ratio of about 1:7, iii straining of the tamarind juice with a muslin cloth or stainless steel
sieve, iv treating of the tamarind juice with 0.08%-0.15% pectic enzyme
concentrate for a period of 10-12 hours at temperatures in the range
of 26°-28°C, v characterized in that formulating the tamarind beverage with the
addition of 11%-14% juice, 10%-16% sugar, 0.04%-0.06% ascorbic
acid and 0.4-0.8 ppm ginger oil, vi clarifying the tamarind beverage obtained in the step v) with a
microfiltration unit using ceramic membrane having 0.1-0.3 urn pore
size at 1-3 bar pressure and 25-30°C temperature, vii pasteurizing the bottled tamarind beverage as obtained in step vii) at
85-90° C for a period of 8-20 minutes to get the final product.
In an embodiment the carbonated clear tamarind beverage is stored at 22°-32°C and a shelf stability of 50-60 days.
The process for the preparation of ready-to-drink, shelf stable tamarind beverage from tamarind juice is illustrated in the following flow sheet.
Manual separation of seeds and fibres from pulp

Extracting the juice by boiling the pulp with water (1: 7 ratio)

Straining the juice through a muslin cloth or stainless steel sieve

Treating of the strained juice with pectic enzyme concentrate

Preparation of Ready-To-Drink tamarind beverage with the specifications:
[10%-16% juice, 12°-18° brix, 0.20%-0.34% acidity, 0.03%-0.08% ascorbic acid and 0.3-1.0 ppm ginger oil]

Clarification of tamarind beverage by Micro Filtration
Filling of the clarified beverage in pre-sterile glass bottles (100-200 ml) and crown corking
Pasteurization of the bottles at 80°-95° C for 8-25 minutes

Storage at room temperature (25°-35° C)
Novelty of the process and Critical steps
Tamarind is a widely grown tree found in the tropical countries. It has been discovered that tamarind extract has several benefits in beverages, which typically use conventional combinations of acids to provide acidity and enhance the perception of flavours. The pulp is a good diet in convalescence to maintain a slightly laxative action of the bowels; as refrigerants in fevers; as an antiscorbutic; a healing product, a febrifuge and even against dysentery, also used in India as

an astringent in bowel complaints and is often used in the modem pharmacology (Wealth of India, 1976; Lewis and Neelakantan, 1964; Duke, 1981).
Tamarind fruits are commercially used for the production of concentrates. They are good sources of natural acids, flavours and therapeutic properties. Tamarind extract holds an eminent place among the acidulants and flavouring agents. In view of the refreshing characteristics and medicinal values, processing of tamarind pulp into beverages has a wide scope in the beverage market. In India, particularly in south the people in their daily diet are consuming this fruit since time immemorial.
The major undesirable changes occurred during storage of tamarind juice/beverage, which result in sedimentation of pulp, loss of flavour, loss of nutrients and development of non-enzymatic browning. Moreover, conventional production of tamarind beverages are not very popular in the market, which may be due to prolonged tartness taste on tongue after drink. Attempt has been made to remove the pulp completely using membrane technology (microfiltration) and incorporation of natural flavouring agents like lime juice or ginger extracts, so that the subsequent product particularly sparkling clear beverage that could be stable for longer period without much change in the beverage quality during storage. Moreover, the Micro Filtration process is hygienic, no involvement of heat, microbiologically safe resulting in very clear juice/beverage.
The novelty of the process lies in the combined manner in which critical steps such as formulation of tamarind juice beverage, clarification of the beverage using Micro Filtration, incorporation of ascorbic acid and ginger oil/extracts, and pasteurization to obtain a high quality clear, ready to drink shelf stable tamarind beverage with acceptable quality attributes.
The following examples are given by way of illustration of the present invention and therefore should not be considered to limit the scope of the present invention.
Example 1
Good quality tamarind pulps were separated manually from seeds and fibres. Two kilograms of tamarind pulp was taken in a stainless steel vessel and to it 10 kg of water was added and brought to boiling on electric heater coil. After 15 minutes intermittent stirring with ladle the heated mass was transferred to a muslin cloth and the juice was squeezed by hand pressing. The residual mass was again mixed with additional 4 kg water and the juice was extracted by hand squeezing through a muslin cloth. The extracted tamarind juice was mixed with 0.1% v/w pectic enzyme concentrate and kept for 12 hours at temperatures of 25°-30° C. The enzyme treated juice of 10 kg was then clarified using a micro filtration unit with ceramic membrane of 0.2 µm average pore size (SCT P 1960) consisting of 19 tubular channels (6 mm i.d.) with a total effective area of 0.3 m2 at operating conditions: 1-3 bar TMP, at 25°-30° C. About 6 kg clear juices were obtained as permeate. Clear ready to drink tamarind beverage of 5 kg was prepared with the specifications (by weight): 12% clear juice, 15° brix, 0.24% acidity, 0.05% ascorbic acid and 0.5 ppm ginger oil. Materials required for 5 kg beverage were: Micro Filtration clarified tamarind juice, 600g; sugar, 665g; ascorbic acid, 2.5g; ginger oil, 2.5 mg and water, 3.73 kg. Subsequently, this beverage was filled into 150 ml glass bottles, crown corked, pasteurized at 90° C for 10 min, and stored at temperatures of 25°-30° C.
Example 2
Five kilograms of good quality tamarind were cleaned and separated seeds and fibers from the pulp. Four kilograms of tamarind pulp was taken in a stainless steel vessel and to it 20 kg of water was added and brought to boiling in a steam kettle. After 15 minutes intermittent stirring with ladle the heated mass was transferred to a muslin cloth and the juice was squeezed by hand pressing. The residual mass was again mixed with additional 8 kg water and the juice was extracted by hand squeezing through a muslin cloth. The extracted tamarind juice was mixed with 0.1% v/w pectic enzyme concentrate and kept for 12 hours at
temperatures of 25°-30° C. The enzyme treated juice was used for preparation of beverage. Ready to drink tamarind beverage of 20 kg was prepared with the specifications (by weight): 12% tamarind juice, 15° brix, 0.24% acidity, 0.05% ascorbic acid and 0.5 ppm ginger oil. Materials required for 20 kg beverage were: tamarind juice extract, 2.4 kg; sugar, 2.66 kg; ascorbic acid, 10g; ginger oil, 10 mg and water, 14.93 kg.
The beverage was then clarified using a microfiltration unit with ceramic membrane (0.2 urn average pore size, SCT P 1960) consisting of 19 tubular channels (6 mm i.d.) with a total effective area of 0.3 m2 at operating conditions: 1-3 bar TMP, at 25°-30° C). About 16 kg-clarified beverages were obtained as permeate. Subsequently, this beverage was filled into 150 ml glass bottles, crown corked, pasteurized at 90° C for 10 min, and stored at temperatures of 25°-30° C.
From the above two examples it is observed that:
a. Two methods for preparation of ready to drink tamarind beverage have
been described (i) Ready-To-Drink beverage after Micro Filtration: the
tamarind juice is clarified first by Micro Filtration and then the crystal clear
juice obtained is used for preparation of Ready-To-Drink tamarind beverage
by adding calculated amount of sugar, ascorbic acid, tamarind juice
(clarified juice), ginger oil and water, and (ii) Ready-To-Drink beverage prior
to Micro Filtration: the beverage is prepared first from the tamarind juice
extract by mixing with the calculated amount of sugar, ascorbic acid, ginger
oil, tamarind juice extract (strained juice), and water and then the prepared
beverage is clarified by Micro Filtration to get crystal clear tamarind
beverage.
b. Beverage prepared by the second method (beverage prior to Micro
Filtration) was more convenient as the beverage was ready for direct filling
into bottles and subsequent crown corking and pasteurization.
c. The beverage obtained from the second method was crystal clear with
acceptable level of tamarind and ginger flavour with no sign of browning
and off flavour in the 60 days' samples stored at 25°-30° C.

d. 10 min pasteurization of bottled beverage at 90° C is enough to prevent from microbial spoilage during storage.
The main advantages of the present invention are:
a) the Micro Filtration process provides the juice under hygienic
condition
b) very clear beverage having pleasant natural flavour with reduced
tartness could be obtained by Micro Filtration due to removal of
suspended solids from the juice/beverage without any chemical or
heat treatment.
c) incorporation of ginger oil added better taste in the product
d) no development of browning and off-flavour during storage.
e) carbonation of the beverage is possible
f) possible to blend with other juices or flavours and to prepare fruit
cordial.





We claim:
1. A process for the preparation of ready-to-drink tamarind beverage having
improved storage life, comprising:
i. separating seeds and fibres from tamarind pulp,
ii. extracting of the tamarind juice is by boiling the pulp with water in
the ratio of about 1:7,
iii. straining of the tamarind juice with a muslin cloth or stainless steel
sieve,
iv. treating of the tamarind juice with 0.08%-0.15% pectic enzyme
concentrate for a period of 10-12 hours at temperatures in the range of 26°-28°C,
v. characterized in that formulating the tamarind beverage with the
addition of 11%-14% juice, 10%-16% sugar, 0.04%-0.06% ascorbic acid and 0.4-0.8 ppm ginger oil,
vi. clarifying the tamarind beverage obtained in the step v) with a micro
filtration unit using ceramic membrane having 0.1-0.3 urn pore size at 1-3 bar pressure and 25°-30°C temperature,
vii. pasteurizing the bottled tamarind beverage as obtained in the above
step at 85°-90° C for a period of 8-20 minutes to get the final product.
2. A process as claimed in claim 1, wherein carbonated clear tamarind beverage is stored at 22°-32°C and improved storage of 50-60 days.
3. A process for the preparation of ready-to-drink tamarind beverage having improved storage life substantially as herein described with reference to the examples accompanying this specification.


Documents:

467-DEL-2004-Abstract-(28-08-2009).pdf

467-del-2004-abstract.pdf

467-DEL-2004-Claims-(28-08-2009).pdf

467-del-2004-claims.pdf

467-DEL-2004-Correspondence-Others-(28-08-2009).pdf

467-del-2004-correspondence.pdf

467-del-2004-correspondene-others.pdf

467-del-2004-correspondene-po.pdf

467-DEL-2004-Description (Complete)-(28-08-2009).pdf

467-del-2004-description (complete).pdf

467-del-2004-description.pdf

467-DEL-2004-Form-1-(28-08-2009).pdf

467-del-2004-form-1.pdf

467-del-2004-form-18.pdf

467-DEL-2004-Form-2-(28-08-2009).pdf

467-del-2004-form-2.pdf

467-DEL-2004-Form-3-(28-08-2009).pdf

467-del-2004-form-3.pdf

467-del-2004-form-5.pdf

467-del-2004-form1.pdf

467-del-2004-form2.pdf

467-del-2004-form3.pdf

467-del-2004-form5.pdf


Patent Number 247122
Indian Patent Application Number 467/DEL/2004
PG Journal Number 13/2011
Publication Date 01-Apr-2011
Grant Date 28-Mar-2011
Date of Filing 16-Mar-2004
Name of Patentee COUNCIL OF SCIENTIFIC AND INDUSTRIAL RESEARCH
Applicant Address RAFI MARG,NEW DELHI,110001,INDIA
Inventors:
# Inventor's Name Inventor's Address
1 KRIPANAND SATHIYA MALA CENTRAL FOOD TECHNOLOGICAL RESEARCH INSTITUTE, MYSORE-570013,INDIA
2 VENKOBARAO MURALI MADHAV CENTRAL FOOD TECHNOLOGICAL RESEARCH INSTITUTE, MYSORE-570013,INDIA
3 NGASEPPAM IBOYAIMA SINGH CENTRAL FOOD TECHNOLOGICAL RESEARCH INSTITUTE, MYSORE-570013,INDIA
PCT International Classification Number A23L 2/02
PCT International Application Number N/A
PCT International Filing date
PCT Conventions:
# PCT Application Number Date of Convention Priority Country
1 NA