Title of Invention

SELF-CALIBRATING METHOD FOR AN ELECTROCHEMICAL SENSOR

Abstract The invention relates to a self-cleaning method for a working electrode of an electrochemical sensor, comprising a working electrode (23) of the micro-disc type, the counter electrode (40) thereto, a reference electrode (42) connected to a potentiostat, a generating electrode (30) made from diamond doped with boron and the counter electrode (48) thereto connected to a current source. The set of electrodes is furthermore connected to an electronic control and measuring unit (46). The method comprises the following steps : application of an anode current to the generating electrode and application of a cathode current to the generating electrode. The invention further relates to a chip (21) with a working electrode (23) and a generating electrode (30) made from diamond, partially covered with a coating (34). The chip is for integration in an electrochemical sensor for measurement of the concentration of a dissolved species in an aqueous medium. The chip has a protective coating (31) such as to prevent all direct contact between the coating (34) and the generating electrode for bringing into contact with the medium.
Full Text FORM 2
THE PATENT ACT 1970 (39 of 1970)
The Patents Rules, 2003 COMPLETE SPECIFICATION
(See Section 10, and rule 13)
1. TITLE OF INVENTION
METHOD FOR USE OF AN ELECTROCHEMICAL SENSOR AND ELECTRODES FORMING SAID SENSOR
2. APPLICANT(S)

a) Name
b) Nationality
c) Address

ADAMANT TECHNOLOGIES SA
SWISS Company
RUE JAQUET-DROZ 1,
CH-2 000 NEUCHATEL,
SWITZERLAND

AND

a) Name
b) Nationality
c) Address

ZUELLIG AG
SWISS Company CH-9424 RHEINECK, SWITZERLAND

3. PREAMBLE TO THE DESCRIPTION
The following specification particularly describes the invention and the manner in which it is to be performed : -

TECHNICAL FIELD
The present invention relates to electrochemical sensors intended for measuring the concentration of a chemical substance in an aqueous medium. Such devices find a particularly interesting but not exclusive application, to the detection of the amount of dissolved oxygen in water, particularly in basins of sewage works.
The invention more particularly relates to a method for self-calibrating an electrochemical sensor and to a method for self-cleaning this sensor. The invention also relates to particularly suitable electrodes for forming this sensor.
BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
The electrochemical sensors of the aforementioned type necessarily include a working electrode, a reference electrode and a counter electrode. Another type of such sensors which further include a so-called generating electrode and its counter electrode, is also known. By adding both of these latter electrodes, the effect of which is to generate changes in the concentration of the species present in solution, it is possible to locally control the environment of the working electrode.
For example, the pH of the solution may be locally changed by applying a current to the generating electrode. A cathode current will cause the production of OH" ions (the pH then becoming more basic) and conversely, an anode current will cause the production of H+ ions (the pH then becoming more acidic). A counter electrode associated with the generating electrode, a counter electrode associated with the working electrode and a reference electrode are required for making a complete sensor.
It will easily be understood that it is particularly advantageous to use, as a working electrode, electrodes of very small dimensions, not only because this allows the gap between the generating electrode and the working electrode to be reduced, but also because the effects of the turbulence of the liquid at the cell are found to be minimized. Such electrodes of small dimensions are indifferently called


subsequently in the description, "micro-electrodes" or "micro-discs", this last name being due to the fact that the micro-electrodes are most often of a circular shape.
Document WO 02/095387 describes a sensor as mentioned earlier and illustrated in Figure 1. It uses an electrically conducting substrate 10, advantageously made in doped silicon and the lower face of which is covered with a metallization layer 11. Its upper face is covered with a passivation layer 12 formed by stacking two sublayers of SiCh and Si3N4, known to have excellent stability in an aqueous medium.
The passivation layer 12 is provided with circular apertures 13. Its upper face and the apertures 13 are covered with a conducting layer 14 bearing reference 16 when it is on the layer 12 and reference 18 when it forms a micro-disc lying on one of the circular apertures 13. The layer 14 is pierced with a network of annular apertures 19 each surrounding one of the micro-discs 18.
The layer 16 forms the generating electrode whereas all the micro-discs 18, electrically connected in parallel with each other, form together the working electrode of the system.
The electrochemical sensors find an interesting application in the measurement of the concentration of dissolved oxygen in basins of sewage works. Indeed, waste water is treated by means of bacteria which are very sensitive to this dissolved oxygen concentration. The information provided by the sensors provides a control on an aeration system of the basin so that the conditions are favorable to bacteria. However, the sensors present on the market do not give satisfactory results, notably because of various contaminations and organic materials which are deposited on the electrode, thereby changing its sensitivity. With conventional sensors, for controlling contamination, one generally resorts to mechanical methods of the pulsed air, pressurized water jet, abrasion type methods which all have a lot of drawbacks.


In order to remove contamination from the surface of the sensor, the application filed under number EP 04 405039.1 proposes the use of a diamond-based generating electrode. When a voltage is applied to it, this electrode generates strongly oxidizing species, such as hydroxyl radicals, capable of efficiently burning organic materials.
However, with the effect obtained by these oxidizing species, it is not possible to totally prevent any contamination. Over the course of time, the sensor is gradually affected, which deteriorates the accuracy of the measurement.
One of the objects of the present invention is therefore to solve the aforementioned problem by proposing a sensor for which accuracy is not dependent on contamination phenomena.
BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
In order to avoid deterioration of the accuracy of the measurement, the invention relates to a method for self-calibrating in situ an electrochemical sensor as defined above and intended to measure the concentration of at least one dissolved species in an aqueous medium.
The self-cleaning method according to the invention comprises the following steps:
first measurement of the current of the working electrode representative of
the concentration of dissolved oxygen in the medium before applying a
current to the generating electrode,
application of an anode current with determined density and duration to the
generating electrode producing a defined increase in the local concentration of
dissolved oxygen,
second measurement of the current of the working electrode representative of
the oxygen concentration after applying a current to the generating electrode,
and


computation, from said first and second measurements, of a calibration factor of said one or more species, which links the oxygen concentration of the medium to be analyzed and the current actually measured between the working electrode and its counter electrode.
Advantageously, the step for applying an anode current has sufficiently short duration so as to get rid of the influence of the hydrodynamic conditions of the medium. This duration is less than 500 ms, more particularly, less than 400 ms.
In a particularly interesting application, the electrochemical sensor mentioned in connection with the methods above, is intended to measure the concentration of dissolved oxygen in an aqueous medium.
BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
Other details of the invention will become more clearly apparent upon reading the
description which follows, made with reference to the appended drawing wherein:
Figures 2 and 3 are top and sectional views of a system of electrodes
according to the invention, respectively,
Figures 4 and 5 illustrate the application of the system of electrodes in a
measuring device according to the invention, and
Figure 6 illustrates the change in the concentration of dissolved oxygen versus
time upon production of oxygen by the generating electrode, for different
hydrodynamic conditions.
DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION
In the description hereinbelow, a negative voltage refers to a cathode potential and a
positive voltage refers to an anode potential.
Figures 2 and 3 illustrate a chip 21. It has an electrically conducting substrate 20 which appears as e.g. a square plate, typically with a side from 2 to 10 mm and a thickness of 0.5 mm. Advantageously, this plate is in silicon made conductive by


doping according to techniques well known to one skilled in the art. It is laid on a support 35 made in insulating polymer.
The substrate 20 on its upper face is pierced with a regular network of substantially cylindrical cavities, with an axis perpendicular to the plane of the substrate. Typically, the cavities have a diameter from 10 to 20 um, a depth from 2 to 20 um and are spaced apart from each other by about 40 to 400 um.
The bottom of each cavity 22 is partly covered with metallization 23 which has a diameter less than that of the cavity 22, by 0.5 to 5 um. The whole of the metallization 23 forms the working electrode of the system. Advantageously, a metal deposit may be made on the metallization 23 by galvanic growth.
The upper face of the substrate 20 is covered with an insulating layer 25, a so-called passivation layer, which for example is formed with a stack of two sublayers of Si02 and Si3N4, and it has a thickness from about 0.1 to 1 um. This layer is pierced with a regular network of circular through-apertures 27 centered on the cavities 22 with a diameter less than that of the cavities.
The structure which has just been described is completed by a generating electrode 30, which may be in diamond, positioned around measuring electrodes according to the teaching of document WO 02/095387 and of application EP 04 405039.1.
More particularly, the electrode 30 is formed with a thin layer of diamond made conductive by doping, which is pierced with circular apertures 26 with a diameter larger than that of the cavities 22 and positioned so that each aperture 26 is concentric with a micro-electrode. Advantageously, the diamond used for forming the electrode is doped with boron.
Alternatively, the working and generating electrodes may be made according to the structure illustrated in Figure 1.


When a voltage is applied to the electrode 30, strongly oxidizing species such as hydroxyl radicals may thereby be generated. As explained in the introduction, the latter may have a detrimental action on polymer coatings 34, for example silicone polymers, generally deposited on the electrical contacts of the generating electrode, more specifically at the interface between the coating 34 and the diamond layer 30 in contact with the medium.
In order to avoid these effects, a protective layer 31 is deposited on the diamond generating electrode 30 prior to the coating 34, so that there no longer exists any direct interface between the coating 34 and the diamond layer 30. This protective layer is made in an electrically insulating inorganic material such as SiCh or SbN^ which further has excellent stability in an aqueous medium. The layer 31 has a thickness between 0.1 and 0.5 um. It is deposited and conformed according to techniques known to one skilled in the art.
Advantageously, the protective layer 31 is located at the periphery of the electrode 30 and forms a frame so as to cover the components to be protected. It comprises apertures 32 required for electrical connection with the generating electrode 30. In order to improve the electric contact with the electrode 30, a metal contact frame, not shown, may be deposited by evaporation on a protective layer 31 which is provided with several apertures 32. The contact frame may also be made separately and then bonded to the electrode 30, at the apertures 32 with a conductive adhesive.
The polymer coating 34 is then deposited on the electrical contacts, and, if there is one, on the contact frame. As this may be seen in Figure 3, the coating juts out over the protective layer 31 and also covers the side surfaces of the chip 21.
The chip 21 described above therefore comprises a working electrode (the whole of the metallizations 23) and a generating electrode 30. It is integrated into a measuring head 38 illustrated in a sectional view in Figure 4. The measuring head 38 further includes a counter electrode for the working electrode 40 and a reference electrode


42. The head 38 is made in a non-metal material of the non-conductive polymer type. The head 38 may also include a counter electrode for the generating electrode, but it will be understood hereafter why it does not appear in the described embodiment.
The areas of the electrodes intended to be contact with the medium to be analyzed are flush with the surface of the measuring head 38 and are located at a short distance from each other. Connecting components 44 cross the measuring head in order to connect the electrodes to the electronic control, measuring unit interfaced with the outside world (display, recording, etc.).
To summarize, it will be retained that the generating electrode and its counter electrode are connected to a current source, whereas the working electrode and its counter electrode on the one hand, and the reference electrode on the other hand, are connected to a potentiostat which allows a voltage to be imposed between the electrodes and thus measurement of the current flowing between the working electrode and its counter electrode at a determined voltage.
The counter electrode of the working electrode 40 is advantageously made in a conductive and chemically stable material, such as stainless steel, gold, or platinum. Its surface area is typically 100 times larger than that of the micro-discs of the working electrode 23. The reference electrode 42 is selected depending on the targeted application. For measuring the concentration of oxygen in an aqueous medium, an electrode of the Ag/AgCl type is generally preferred.
As indicated above for the chip 21, a layer of polymer material 34 is deposited on the edges of the substrates of the electrodes;
The measuring head 38 is sealably mounted to the end of a probe body 48, generally of tubular shape, visible in Figure 5. In order to ensure that the connection components 44 of the head 38 are properly positioned relatively to the electronic unit 46 which is placed in the probe body, the head 38 is provided with positioning holes


50 which cooperate with lugs positioned in the body 48. It is thus very easy to replace the measuring head 38 if need be. The measuring head is then attached to the body of the probe by means of a ring 49 which is screwed onto the body of the probe so as to provide the seal of the assembly.
In an illustrated advantageous alternative, the probe body 48 is made in a metal material, such as stainless steel, and is used as a counter electrode for the generating electrode. Optionally, the body 48 is used as a counter electrode for the generating electrode and/or for the working electrode. The body 48 may also include a non-metal portion and a metal portion, the latter being used as a counter electrode.
The end of the probe body 48 which receives the measuring head 38 is tilted by an angle between 0 and 90°, preferably between 30 and 60°, preferably of the order of 45°, relatively to the remainder of the body 48. As the latter is immersed vertically into the liquid to be analyzed, the angle which its end has, allows the hydrodynamic conditions to be improved around the measuring head 38, particularly when the medium is stirred.
A method for using the electrochemical sensor which has just been described is explained hereafter, particularly with reference to an application to the measurement of dissolved oxygen in an aqueous medium.
The amperometric measurement of concentration of dissolved oxygen in an aqueous medium is achieved by applying an adequate reduction potential between the working electrode and the reference electrode. A reduction current is then generated, proportional to the concentration of dissolved oxygen in the liquid flowing between the working electrode and its counter electrode. The current in the working electrode may then be measured, this current being representative of the oxygen concentration of the medium.


A self-calibrating procedure, an example of which will be provided below, provides effective compensation of the drifts due to sensitivity losses of the working electrode. This in situ procedure is based on a change in the local concentration of dissolved oxygen, obtained by means of suitable changes in the polarization of the generating electrode which cause electrolysis of water according to the reaction:
2H2 O ®O2 + 4H+ + 4e-
This reaction locally changes the dissolved oxygen concentration in a specific way and regardless of the oxygen content of the surrounding medium. Indeed, the density and the application time of the current received by the generating electrode provide control of the production of oxygen.
With the difference between the responses of the working electrode before and after the production of oxygen by the generating electrode, the calibration factor may be inferred. The latter represents the sensitivity of the sensor and provides for a given sensor, a proportionality coefficient between the oxygen concentration of the medium to be analyzed and the actually measured current between the working electrode and its counter electrode.
Generally, the time during which the dissolved oxygen concentration is locally increased, depends on the stirring conditions of the medium.
As shown in Figure 6, which illustrates on curves a to d, the change in the oxygen concentration versus time under different stirring conditions, it was surprisingly seen that for a chip 21 provided with micro-discs, the concentration increases during the first instants of oxygen production linearly, without the hydrodynamic conditions having any influence. This linear phase lasts for about 500 ms. Thus, if the electrolysis current is only applied to the generating electrode for a reduced time, stirring of the medium does not perturb the oxygen concentration in the diffusion area and it is then possible to specifically measure the current generated by the


oxygen actually produced by the generating electrode and to compute a calibration factor.
In a low conductivity medium, the electric field generated by the generating electrode may perturb the behavior of the reference electrode during self-calibration, if, during this procedure, measurement is performed simultaneously with operation of the generating electrode. In order to overcome this drawback, the self-calibration measurement is performed just after stopping the power supply of the generating electrode, on one point or by averaging the values obtained in a certain range, as this is seen hereinbelow. However, a measurement may be carried out while applying a current to the generating electrode.
Although a self-calibrating procedure allows compensation of possible drifts, due to fouling of the micro-electrodes, it is nevertheless of interest to be able to retain good sensitivity of the working electrode. This is obtained by a self-cleaning operation, performed in situ, and made possible by the properties of the boron-doped diamond of the generating electrode. This operation may also be performed with a preventive purpose.
Self-cleaning is obtained by the conjunction of several effects caused by applying to the diamond electrode currents with different polarity and density. First of all, an anode current causes a production of H+ ions, which acidifies the aqueous medium close to the electrode. Thus, scale type deposits (calcium carbonate, magnesium oxides) are dissolved. Further, this type of current applied on a boron-doped diamond electrode causes a production of strongly active species such as hydroxyl radicals which degrade the organic deposits such as bio-films, and have biocidal activity.
Further, applying a cathode current causes the production of OH" ions which makes the aqueous medium basic close to the electrode. Thus, an alternation of


anode/cathode currents causes a strong variation of the pH close to the diamond electrode, thereby preventing formation of a bio-film.
The self-cleaning step is applied at defined intervals, so that the oxygen produced during applying an anode current does not perturb subsequent measurements.
Different procedures are defined, each comprising a detailed series of sequences performed in a determined order in order to achieve the self-cleaning, self-calibrating and measuring step.
The electronic control unit 46 mentioned above, further comprises a programmed microprocessor for handling:
the duration of the different steps,
the potential differences between the working electrode and the reference
electrode,
measuring under a determined potential difference and as imposed by the
potentiostat, the current which flows through between the working electrode
and its counter electrode,
the current applied between the generating electrode and its counter
electrode, and
the disconnection of the working and reference electrodes during the
production of oxygen of the self-cleaning phase.
The other components of the electronic control unit 46 are perfectly accessible to one skilled in the art and are therefore not described here in detail.
At defined intervals, the current flowing between the working electrode and its counter electrode is measured and the concentration of dissolved oxygen is computed by means of the calibration factor determined beforehand. As an example, a typical measuring procedure, optionally comprising a mild self-cleaning step, includes the following sequences.


Waiting and mild self-cleaning:
i the working and reference electrodes are disconnected from their power supply, for a time typically between 0 and 60 s, more particularly 15 s.
ii mild self-cleaning is obtained by applying an anode current with a density typically between 0.5 and 2 mA/cm2, more particularly 1 mA/cm2, for a period ranging from 0.5 to 5 s, typically 1 s, starting immediately after the disconnection mentioned in point i. The remaining time for this step allows the oxygen produced at the generating electrode to be dispersed by diffusion into the medium.
Activation of the working electrode:
i an anode activation is obtained by applying a voltage typically between 200
and 1,500 mV, more particularly 500 mV, for a time typically between 0.1 and
30 s, more particularly 3 s.
ii a cathode activation is obtained by applying a voltage typically between -200
and -1,500 mV, more particularly -1,100 mV for a time typically between 0.1
and 10 s, more particularly 1 s.
- Measurement and computation
i stabilization is obtained by applying to the working electrode a voltage
typically between -500 and -1,200 mV, more particularly -900 mV for a time
typically between 0.1 and 60 s, more particularly 8 s.
ii measurement and determination of the average current flowing between the
working electrode and its counter electrode are conducted under a voltage
typically between -500 and -1,300 mV, more particularly -900 mV, for a time
between 0.1 and 30 s, more particularly 2 s.
iii the concentration of dissolved oxygen is computed from the current
determined in the previous step and by means of the calibration factor
predetermined according to the procedure provided above.


Such a measuring procedure is repeated at a frequency of typically 0.5 to 5 times per minute according to the values of the parameters defined above, more particularly 2 measurements per minute.
A self-calibration procedure typically comprises the following steps:
Waiting:
i. the working and reference electrodes are disconnected from their power
supply, for a time typically between 0 and 60 s, more particularly 15 s.
Activation of the working electrode:
i. an anode activation is obtained by applying a voltage typically between 200
and 1,500 mV, more particularly 500 ms for a time typically between 0.1 and
30 s, more particularly 3 s. ii. a cathode activation is obtained by applying a voltage typically between -200
and -1,500 mV, more particularly -1,100 mV for a time typically between 0.1
and 10 s, more particularly 1 s.
Measurement of the oxygen concentration after applying a current to the
generating electrode:
i. stabilization is obtained by applying to the working electrode a voltage
typically between -500 and -1,300 mV, more particularly -900 mV for a time
typically between 0.1 and 60 s, more particularly 8 s. ii. a measurement and determination of the average current flowing between the
working electrode and its counter electrode are conducted under a voltage
typically between -500 mV and 1,300 mV, more particularly -900 mV, for a
time typically between 0.1 and 30 s, more particularly 2 s.
Applying a self-calibration current to the generating electrode so as to produce a defined increase in the local concentration of dissolved oxygen:


i. an anode current with a density typically between 0.1 and 10 mA/cm2, more
particularly 1 mA/cm2, is applied for a time typically 0.1 and 1 s, more particularly 0.4 s.
Measuring the oxygen concentration after applying a current to the
generating electrode:
i. stabilization is obtained by applying to the working electrode a voltage
typically between -500 and -1,300 mV, more particularly -900 mV, for a time
typically between 0.01 and 0.1 s, more particularly 0.04 s.
ii. measurement and determination of the average current flowing between the
working electrode and its counter electrode are conducted under a voltage
typically between -500 and -1,300 mV, more particularly -900 mV, for a time
typically between 0.01 and 0.2 s, more particularly 0.08 s.
iii. a new calibration factor for the working electrode is computed from the
difference of the measurements before and after applying the self-calibration
current on the auxiliary electrode.
Such a self-calibrating procedure is repeated at a frequency from 0.1 to 48 times per day, typically once a day.
A self-cleaning procedure typically comprises the following steps:
i. applying an anode current to the generating electrode with a density typically
between 0.5 and 100 mA/cm2, more particularly 2 mA/cm2, for a time
typically between 0.5 and 60 s, more particularly 3 s,
ii. applying a cathode current to the generating electrode with a density typically
between 0.5 and 5 mA/cm2, more particularly 2 mA/cm2, for a time typically
between 0.5 and 60 s, more particularly 3 s, and
iii. repeating both preceding steps 1 to 30 times, more particularly 3 times.
Such a self-cleaning procedure is repeated at a frequency from 10 to 200 times per day, typically 100 times a day.


Thus, different particularly advantageous in situ self-calibrating, self-cleaning and measuring procedures are proposed with which good accuracy of an electrochemical sensor may be retained while avoiding the influence of any contamination due to the measurement medium. Moreover, the electrochemical sensor according to the invention allows self-cleaning, while preventing the oxidizing species from etching constitutive components of the sensor.
The present invention is not limited to an electrochemical sensor measuring the concentration of dissolved oxygen in a medium. Indeed, it is possible to establish a correlation between the measured currents for different analyzed species. Thus, from the oxygen produced by the generating electrode, it is possible to determine a self-calibration factor in order to allow the sensor to measure the concentration of a dissolved species other than oxygen, for example chlorine or ozone.


WE CLAIM:
1. An in situ self-calibrating method for an electrochemical sensor intended to
measure the concentration of at least one dissolved species in an aqueous
medium,
said sensor including a working electrode of micro-disc type and its counter
electrode, and a reference electrode, connected to a potentiostat on the one
hand, and a generating electrode and its counter electrode connected to a
current source on the other hand, these electrodes defining a set being further
connected to an electronic control unit,
said method comprising the following steps:
a first measurement of the current of the working electrode representative of
the concentration of dissolved oxygen in the medium before applying a current
to the generating electrode,
applying an anode current with determined density and duration to the
generating electrode producing a defined increase in the local concentration of
dissolved oxygen,
a second measurement of the current of the working electrode representative
of the concentration of oxygen after applying a current to the generating
electrode, and
computing from said first and second measurements, a calibration factor for
said one or more species, which relates the oxygen concentration of the
medium to be analyzed and the actually measured current between the
working electrode and its counter electrode.
2. The self-calibrating method of claim 1, wherein the step for applying an anode current has sufficiently short duration in order to get rid of the influence of the hydrodynamic conditions of the medium.
3. The self-calibrating method of claim 2 for a sensor wherein the generating electrode is positioned around the working electrode and wherein the duration


of the step for applying an anode current is less than 500 ms, more particularly less than 400 ms.
4. The self-calibrating method according of claim 1, wherein said sensor is intended to measure the concentration of dissolved oxygen in an aqueous medium.
5. The self-calibrating method according of claim 2, wherein said sensor is intended to measure the concentration of dissolved oxygen in an aqueous medium.
6. The self-calibrating method according of claim 3, wherein said sensor is intended to measure the concentration of dissolved oxygen in an aqueous medium.





ABSTRACT
The invention relates to a self-cleaning method for a working electrode of an electrochemical sensor, comprising a working electrode (23) of the micro-disc type, the counter electrode (40) thereto, a reference electrode (42) connected to a potentiostat, a generating electrode (30) made from diamond doped with boron and the counter electrode (48) thereto connected to a current source. The set of electrodes is furthermore connected to an electronic control and measuring unit (46). The method comprises the following steps : application of an anode current to the generating electrode and application of a cathode current to the generating electrode. The invention further relates to a chip (21) with a working electrode (23) and a generating electrode (30) made from diamond, partially covered with a coating (34). The chip is for integration in an electrochemical sensor for measurement of the concentration of a dissolved species in an aqueous medium. The chip has a protective coating (31) such as to prevent all direct contact between the coating (34) and the generating electrode for bringing into contact with the medium.
To,
The Controller of Patents,
The Patent Office,
Mumbai


Documents:

1687-MUMNP-2007-ABSTRACT(7-3-2011).pdf

1687-mumnp-2007-abstract.doc

1687-mumnp-2007-abstract.pdf

1687-MUMNP-2007-CANCELLED PAGES(7-3-2011).pdf

1687-MUMNP-2007-CLAIMS(AMENDED)-(7-3-2011).pdf

1687-MUMNP-2007-CLAIMS(MARKED COPY)-(7-3-2011).pdf

1687-mumnp-2007-claims.doc

1687-mumnp-2007-claims.pdf

1687-mumnp-2007-correspondence(19-3-2008).pdf

1687-mumnp-2007-correspondence-others.pdf

1687-mumnp-2007-correspondence-received.pdf

1687-mumnp-2007-description (complete).pdf

1687-MUMNP-2007-DRAWING(7-3-2011).pdf

1687-mumnp-2007-drawings.pdf

1687-mumnp-2007-form 1(7-1-2008).pdf

1687-MUMNP-2007-FORM 1(7-3-2011).pdf

1687-mumnp-2007-form 2(title page)-(15-10-2007).pdf

1687-MUMNP-2007-FORM 2(TITLE PAGE)-(7-3-2011).pdf

1687-MUMNP-2007-FORM 3(7-3-2011).pdf

1687-MUMNP-2007-FORM 5(7-3-2011).pdf

1687-mumnp-2007-form-1.pdf

1687-mumnp-2007-form-18.pdf

1687-mumnp-2007-form-2.doc

1687-mumnp-2007-form-2.pdf

1687-mumnp-2007-form-3.pdf

1687-mumnp-2007-form-5.pdf

1687-mumnp-2007-general power of attorney(28-11-2007).pdf

1687-MUMNP-2007-GENERAL POWER OF ATTORNEY(7-3-2011).pdf

1687-MUMNP-2007-PETITION UNDER RULE 137(7-3-2011).pdf

1687-MUMNP-2007-REPLY TO EXAMINATION REPORT(7-3-2011).pdf

1687-MUMNP-2007-U S PATENT(7-3-2011).pdf

1687-mumnp-2007-wo international publication report-(15-10-2007).pdf

abstract1.jpg


Patent Number 246914
Indian Patent Application Number 1687/MUMNP/2007
PG Journal Number 12/2011
Publication Date 25-Mar-2011
Grant Date 21-Mar-2011
Date of Filing 15-Oct-2007
Name of Patentee ADAMANT TECHNOLOGIES SA
Applicant Address RUE JAQUET-DORZ 1, CH-2000 NEUCHATEL
Inventors:
# Inventor's Name Inventor's Address
1 SANTOLI EDUAERDO CHAMP DE LA PIERRE 15, CH-2103 NOIRAIGUE
2 RYCHEN PHILIPPE RUE DE L'EGLISE 4, F-68640 MUESPACH LE HAUT,
3 GOBET JEAN CUDEAU-DU-HAUT 22, CH-2035 CORCELLES.
4 PFAENDLER REMO FLORASTRASSE 7, CH-9403 GOLDACH
5 BITSCHE PAUL PRAELATD PRAELAT DREXEL STRASSE 6, A-6845 HOHENEMS
PCT International Classification Number G01N27/416
PCT International Application Number PCT/EP2006/061681
PCT International Filing date 2006-04-19
PCT Conventions:
# PCT Application Number Date of Convention Priority Country
1 05103304.1 2005-04-22 EUROPEAN UNION