Title of Invention

" A METHOD FOR PRODUCING BLENDED YARNS"

Abstract No. IN/PCT/2002/00063/CHE ABSTRACT A METHOD FOR PRODUCING BLENDED YARNS A method for producing yams wherein in a first sub-process (PI) in a spinning machine with a first speed (VI) a raw yam of artificial fibres is spun and pre-drawn, whereupon in a second sub-process (P2) in a texturing machine at a second production speed (V2) the raw yam is drawn and textured, whereupon in a third sub-process (P3) in an admixing at a third production speed (V3) the textured yam whilst supplying an elastic filament is admixed into the end product, characterised in that, the second production speed (V2) of the second sub-process (P2) is either adapted to the first production speed (VI) of the first sub-process (PI) or to the third production speed (V3) of the first sub-process (P3), and that the second sub-process (P2) is grouped together with one of the timely adjacent sub-processes (P1,P3).
Full Text

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A method-for producing blended yams
The invention relates to a method for producing blended yams according to the preamble of the independent patent claim.
Blended yams today are nowadays formed in three various independent sub-processes and in various operations. At the same time each sub-process as such is set up to the optimal speed. This of course concerns not only the sub-process as such but also the whole periphery around the sub-process. The process course begins with spin-drawing the artificial fibres. This spin-drawing is effected with a very large processing speed and in large installations is carried out in a spinning mill. Everything is set up for a large production. Each spinning machine comprises a multitude of individual spinning locations. For these reasons the produced raw yam is also wound onto large spinning windings of normally 30 kg yarn weight.
The texturing or drawing-texturing process takes place in a separate installation, mostly in a separate factory. Here the artificial fibre of raw yarn is pulled off from the delivered 30 kg winding and texturised according to a known manner. Since with this the volume increases one may only texturise with a significanltly slower second speed. So that this texturising is quick and productive enough each texturing machine comprises a multitude of texturing locations. The texturised yarn is subsequently usually wound onto a winding with a yarn weight of 5 kg. This processs takes place in native production workshops. The 5 kg yam winding is then delivered further.
In the third sub-process the texturised yam is wound off from the 5 kg winding and in an air interiacing process is provided in part share with Elastane, Lycra and similar fibres. This process is always dependent on the quality of the texturised yarn and on the type of the admixing for example the interiacing and on the quantitative part share of the added fibres. This third sub-process functions with a third, mostly even lower speed. So that this sub-process is productive enough each admixing or interiacing machine comprises a plurality of admixing locations for example interiacing locations. This too is effected again in a separate production work shop which is specially adapted to this.
It is the object of the invention to so change at least one of these three sub-processes such that at least two of the sub-processes may be grouped together.
This object is achieved by the invention specified in th^ patent claims. Vor this it is
necessary that the sub-process of the drawing or texturing is adapted eitherto the conditions

and speeds of the spinning-drawing or however to the speed of the air interlacing with the elastic part share.
An additional advantage of the invention is that at least one re-spooling location of one winding to the next and thus an en^or source is done away with.
A further advantage of the invention lies in the fact that two production workshops which until now have been separate may be grouped together. One may texture either in the spinning mill directly following the spinning process or the texturising process precedes directly before and together with the airtex process. By way of this at least once the transport from yam winding between two production workshops is done away with.
The invention is hereinafter described in context with the drawings. There are shown in:
Figure 1 the course of the process from spinning up to the finished elastic yarn acccording
to the state of the art;
Figure 2 the course of the process according to variant 1 by grouping together two sub-
processes;
Figure 3 the course of the process according to variant 2 by grouping together two other
sub-processes;
Figure 4 a scheme of optimising the sub-process of the drawing-texturing and
Figure 5 a scheme for drawing, texturing and admixing.
The course of processing according to the state of the art is shown in Figure 1.
The production of a blended yam begins with the spinning of an artificial fibre of raw yarn in a first sub-process P1. This raw yarn is according to known technology manufactured in known spinning machines in a large quantity. For this from a granulate the raw yarn is spun and drawn correct to purpose. Both are effected on the same machine and mostly in the same working procedure. Such spinning machines function with a very high production speed V1. At the same time each spinning machine has a multitude of individual spinning locations. Since the production speed V1 is large the removal of the raw yam for the further processing must be

accordingly equipped. Therefore the produced raw yarn is also wound onto large spinning windings W1 of normally in each case 30 kg yarn weight.
The spinning windings W1 are now transported to a texturing company T1. Here the raw yarn is pulled from the spinning windings W1 and is now treated in texturing machines as a second sub-process P2. On texturing the raw yam obtains a desired texture. At the same time the volume of the yarn increases considerably. So that this texturing is quick and productive enough each texturing machine comprises a multitude of texturing locations. The texturing machines function at a second production speed V2 which is suitable for these machines. The texturised yarn is subsequently usually wound onto a second winding W2 with a yann weight of in each case 5 kg. The second windings W2 are now transported to the next company T2.
In the subsequent third sub-process P3 the textured yarn is pulled of from the 5 kg windings and in an air interlacing process is provided with a part share with elastic fibres. This third sub-process functions with a third, mostly even smaller production speed V3. So that this sub-process is productive enough each admixing, for example interlacing machine comprises a plurality of admixing locations. At the same time from in each case a quarter winding W3 an additional filament is pulled off and at the admixing location is entangled with the texturised yarn together with the blended yarn. It is evident that this may be effected with various methods which are known per se such as for example air interiacing, doubling, twisting and likewise. At the end of this third sub-process now the finished elastic yarn is wound onto third windings of in each case 6 kg yarn weight. The second winding W2 and the third winding W3 may be equal since the volume of the finished elastic yarn differs only insignificantly from the textured yarn, wherein however the yam weight increases by the part share of the elastic fibres.
With the new method in a first variant according to Figure 2 now the second sub-process P2 and the third sub-process P3 are grouped together. This is effected in that the second production speed V2 is adapted to the third production speed V3 such that both are identical. By way of this it is possible that to each texturing location T1 there directly connects an interiacing location W1 and only the finished elastic yam is again wound up. This means that the second transport T2 of the second winding W2 from the second sub-process P2 to the third sub-process P3 including stretching, tensioning and unravelling onto the elements of the subsequent processing stage are done away with. It is evident that the production is possible in a less inexpensive manner and at the same time sources of error are done away with. Likewise a quality control arranged therebetween after the texturing may also be done away with. With regard to the necessary design of the elements for the second sub-process P2 this will be gone into more detail in combination with Figure 4.



second production speed V2 may be sufficiently adapted to the other sub-processes P1, P3 it is necessary for the drive as well as pre-heating, texturing heating and active cooling in the cooling channel of the texturing path 44 to be individually controllable for each texturing module 4. Particular possibilities result from the measures described hereinafter.
The pre-drawing may either be produced with two heating galettes arranged behind one another which have different speeds and possibly different temperatures. It may however also be achieved with a drawing pin and a heating galette. The heating and the pre-heating must be provided with sufficient power. This may for example be effected by the application of heating galettes of infra-red heating, air nozzle heating, resistance contact heating and of combinations thereof. Likewise the cooling must be of sufficient power and be transmitted to the yarn wherein one must take particular account of the fact that the yarn during the full production speed must be cooled to the necessary temperatures duing the texturing. For this not only is air cooling suitable but also fluid cooling with or without direct contact with the yarn. Further special possibilities are likewise provided so that the heat arising in the heated yarn may be led away from the cooling path also sufficiently quickly. For example such a cooling channel may be filled with water, oil coolant or liquid sodium, a salt or salt mixture with a suitable meiting temperature. Particulariy suitable is of course the use of a coolant which evaporates at the prevailing temperature range between about 50° and 300°. With this the latent heat or the arising evaporation cold considerably helps to sufficiently remove heat from the yarn in order to cool it within the texturing path 44 to the suitable temperature. Likewise important may be a thread tension control with measurement and regulation. For this there is arranged a sensor for monitoring the thread tension in the region of the texturing path and its readings are used for controlling the tension of the thread.
So that with this third sub-process the individual drawing-texturing module is exactly controlled it is recommendend for the thread temperature to be measured where possible without contact at least in the region of the false twist organ 45. From these readings by way of online evaluation as simultanously as possible the heating and cooling is controlled. This is unavoidable so that the adapted second production speed V2 may be maintained. The more exact the temperature control, the better is the adaptation to the preceding or subsequent sub-process.
In Figure 5 there is schematically shown a grouping-together of the second sub-process P2 with the third sub-process P3 in the context with an individual drawing-texturing module 4. Additional to the embodiment according to Figure 4 now the additional filament from the quarter winding W4 directly after removal from the texturing path is admixed at the elasticity correction
s

station 64 in the third sub-process P3. This may be effected in other cases by interlacing, doubhr»^=^ twisting. On account of the individual adaptability of the speed of the individual texturing module the production speed V2 and V3 of the two sub-processes P2, P3 may exactly matched to one another and optimised.
Such a blended yarn may be manufactured by admixing a synthetic filament, for example a filament with particular elastic properties but also a filament of cotton, wool or other material.
The grouping-together according to the invention of the second and of the third sub-process P2, P3 may be extended without reels therebetween by a further sub-process. Thus it is possible to lead the produced blended yarn directly to a circular knitting machine which may be adapted to the individual process speeds under the mentioned conditions and with the mentioned means.


WE CLAIM :
1. A method for producing yams wherein in a first sub-process (PI) in a spinning machine with a first speed (VI) a raw yam of artificial fibres is spun and pre-drawn, whereupon in a second sub-process (P2) in a texturing machine at a second production speed (V2) the raw yam is drawn and textured, whereupon in a third sub-process (P3) m an admixing at a third production speed (V3) the textured yam whilst supplying an elastic filament is admixed into the end product,
characterized in that
the second production speed (V2) of the second sub-process (P2) is either adapted to the first production speed (VI) of the first sub-process (PI), whereupon the raw yam at the end of the first sub-process (PI) from a spinning location of the spinning machine is led directly to an individually controllable texturing module (4) of the texturing machine for the second sub- process (P2), whereupon the textured yam is wound onto a textured yam winding (W12), whereupon for the third sub-process (P3)the textured yarn is pulled from the textured yam winding (W12) whilst supplying a filament (F4) to be admixed to the admixing as a third sub- process (P3) and subsequently the finished blended yam is wound onto a yam winding (W5) wherein the first and the second production speed (VI, V2) are identical;
or the second production speed (V2) of the second sub-process (P2) is adapted to the third production speed (V3) of the fest sub-process (li), whereupon the raw yam after the first sub- process (PI) is wound onto a spinning winding, whereupon the raw yam is pulled from the spinning winding and in a second sub-process (P2) in a texturing module (4) of the texturing machine is textured and directly led to an admixing location (5) of the admixing machine whilst supplying the additional filament as a third sub-process (P3), whereupon the finished blended yam is wound onto a yam winding, wherein the second and the third production speeds are identical.

2. A method as claimed in claim 1, wherein the raw yam after the first sub-process (PI) is wound onto a spinning winding, whereupon the raw yam is pulled from the spinning winding and in a second sub-process (P2) in a texturing module (4) of the texturing machine is textured and directly led to an admixing location (5) of the admixing machine whilst supplying the additional filament as a third sub-process (P3), whereupon the finished blended yam is wound onto a yam winding, wherein the second and the third production speeds are identical.
3. A method as claimed in claim 1, wherein the raw yam at the end of the first sub-process (PI) from a spinning location of the spinning machine is led directly to an individually controllable texturing module (4) of the texturing machine for the second sub- process (P2), whereupon the textured yam is wound onto a textured yam winding (W12), whereupon for the third sub-process (P3) the textured yam is pulled from the textured yam winding (W12) whilst supplying a filament (F4) to be admixed to the admixing as a third sub- process (P3) and subsequently the finished blended yam is wound onto a yam winding (W5) wherein the first and the second production speed (VI, V2) are identical.
4. A device for carrying out the method according to one of the patent claims 1 to 3, with a texturing machine which comprises a number of texturing modules (4) with in each case a yarn mn-in (48), a heating path, a texturing path (44) and a yam run-out (49) wherein the texturing path (44) is arranged between a twist stop (43) and a false twist organ (45), characterized in that each texturing path (44) comprises a cooling channel with an active cooling and that each texturing module (4) is individually controllable with respect to the heating temperature of the heating path (Tl, T2), the cooling temperature (T3) of the cooling channel and the run-through speed of the yam.
5. A device as claimed in claim 4, wherein the heating path comprises a first pre¬heating (41) and a second pre-heating (42) with a pre-drawing lying therebetween.

6. A device as claimed in claim 4, wherein the first pre-heating (41) comprises an infra-red heating; an air-nozzle heating or a resistance contact heating and the second pre- heating (42) comprises a heating galette.
7. A device as claimed in claim 4, wherein the first and the second pre-heating (41, 42) are heating galettes.
8. A device as claimed in claim 4, wherein the active cooling of the texturing path (44) of each texturing module (4) is an air cooling or a fluid cooling with direct yam contact of the cooling means.
9. A device as claimed in claim 4, wherein the active cooling of the texturing path (44) of each texturing module (4) comprises a cooling channel, wherein the cooling channel is cool able by way of liquid or gaseous coolant.
10. A device as claimed in claim 4, wherein the active cooling of the texturing path (44) of each texturing module (4) comprises a cooling channel, wherein the cooling channel is cool able by way of a salt-containing medium.
11. A device as claimed in claim 4, wherein the active cooling of the yam is effected by way of evaporation heat of a coolant.
12. A device as claimed in any one of the claims 4 to 11, wherein a thread temperature sensor is arranged in the region of the texturing path (44) whose readings are used for controlling for the active cooling.
13. A device as claimed in any one of the claims 4 to 11, wherein a sensor for monitoring the thread tension is arranged in the region of the texturing path (44) whose readings are used for controlling the thread tension.
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14. A device as claimed in any one of the claims 4 to 13 wherein the yam run-in (48) is connectable directly to a spinning location of the first sub-process (PI) of a spinning machine.
15. A device as claimed in any one of claims 4 to 13, wherein the yam run-out (49) is connectable directly to an interlacing location of the third sub-process (P3) of an interlacing machine.

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Documents:

in-pct-2002-00063-che abstract.pdf

in-pct-2002-00063-che claims.pdf

in-pct-2002-00063-che correspondance others.pdf

in-pct-2002-00063-che correspondance po.pdf

in-pct-2002-00063-che description(complete).pdf

in-pct-2002-00063-che drawings.pdf

in-pct-2002-00063-che form-1.pdf

in-pct-2002-00063-che form-19.pdf

in-pct-2002-00063-che form-26.pdf

in-pct-2002-00063-che form-3.pdf

in-pct-2002-00063-che form-4.pdf

in-pct-2002-00063-che form-5.pdf

in-pct-2002-00063-che pct.pdf

in-pct-2002-00063-che petition.pdf


Patent Number 244935
Indian Patent Application Number IN/PCT/2002/63/CHE
PG Journal Number 53/2010
Publication Date 31-Dec-2010
Grant Date 27-Dec-2010
Date of Filing 10-Jan-2002
Name of Patentee RETECH AKTIENGESELLSCHAFT
Applicant Address LINDENMATTSTRASSE 731,CH-5616 MEISTERSCHWANDEN
Inventors:
# Inventor's Name Inventor's Address
1 JAGGI MARKUS GUGELWEG 22,CH-5103 MORIKEN,
2 VON ARX HEINZ OBERE SEEFELDSTRASSE 488, CH-5616MEISTERSCHWANDEN,
PCT International Classification Number D02G 1/02
PCT International Application Number PCT/CH00/00063
PCT International Filing date 2000-02-07
PCT Conventions:
# PCT Application Number Date of Convention Priority Country
1 1309/99 1999-07-15 Switzerland