Title of Invention

LIPOXYGENASE

Abstract A polypeptide having lipoxygenase enzyme activity which: has an amino acid sequence which is identified with the mature polypeptide of SEQ ID NO: 2 or 23; is enclosed by a nucleic acid sequence which hybridizes at 55°C with a complementary strand of the nucleic acid sequence encoding the mature polypeptide of SEQ ID NO: 1 or a subsequence thereof having at least 100 nucleotides; is encoded by the lipoxygenase-encoding part of the DNA sequence cloned into a plasmid in Escherichia coli deposit number DSM 13586.
Full Text

LIPOXYGENASE
FIELD OF THE INVENTION
The present invention relates to a polynucleotide encoding a lipoxygenase and fts use for recombinant production of a lipoxygenase. The invention also relates to a method of obtaining a lipoxygenase by screening a DNA library with specific probes.
BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
Lipoxygenase is an enzyme that catalyzes the oxygenation of linoleic acid and produces a hydroperoxide. It is classified in Enzyme Nomenclature as EC 1.13.11.12. The enzyme is widely distributed in plants and animals. Encoding genes have been isolated from various sources, and the sequences have been published. Thus, GENESEQP W93832 and Genbank U78294 give the sequence of human 15S lipoxygenase.
Microbial lipoxygenases are known from a yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a thermophilic actinomycete Thermoactinomyces vulgaris, from fungus Fusarium oxysporum, Fusarium proliferatum and Gaeumannomyces graminis (Su and Oliw, J. Biological Chemistry, 273 (21), 13072-13079 (1998)). No isolated gene encoding a microbial lipoxygenase has been described.
The prior art describes various uses of lipoxygenase, e.g. as a food additive to bread dough or noodles.
SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
Here we for the first time provide sequence information of a microbial protein having lipoxygenase activity and a method of producing the protein in industrial scale. More specifically, the inventors have isolated a gene encoding a lipoxygenase from Gaeumannomyces graminis, cloned it into an £. coli strain and sequenced it. The genome of G. graminis contains approximately 60% of the G and C nucleotides, which made this work very difficult. A comparison shows less than 25 % identity to known lipoxygenase sequences, the closest being human 15S lipoxygenase. The inventors have expressed the lipoxygenase recombi-nantly.
Accordingly, the invention provides a polypeptide having lipoxygenase enzyme activity which:
a) has an amino acid sequence which has at least 50 % identity with the mature polypeptide of SEQ ID NO: 2 or 23;
b) is encoded by a nucleic acid sequence which hybridizes at 55°C with a complementary strand of the nucleic acid sequence encoding the mature polypeptide of SEQ ID NO: 1 or a subsequence thereof having at least 100 nucleotides;

c) has an amino acid sequence which can be obtained from the mature poly-peptide of SEQ ID NO: 2 or 23 by substitution, deletion, and/or insertion of one or more amino acids; or
d) is encoded by the lipoxygenase-encoding part of the DNA sequence cloned into a plasmid present in Escherichia coli deposit number DSM 13586.
The invention also provides a polynucleotide which comprises:
a) the partial DNA sequence encoding a mature lipoxygenase cloned into a plasmid present in Escherichia coli DSM 13586,
b) the partial DNA sequence encoding a mature lipoxygenase shown in SEQ ID NO: 2 or 23,
c) an analogue of the sequence defined in a) or b) which encodes a lipoxygenase and
i) has at least 50 % identity with said DNA sequence-, or
ii) hybridizes at low stringency with a complementary strand of said DNA se-quence or a subsequence thereof having at least 100 nucleotides, iii) is an allelic variant thereof, or
d) a complementary strand of a), b) or c).
Other aspects of the invention provide a nucleic acid construct comprising the polynucleotide, a recombinant expression vector comprising the nucleic acid construct, and a recombinant host cell transformed with the nucleic acid construct. The invention also provides a recombinant method of producing the lipoxygenase, an oligonucleotide probe based on SEQ ID NO: 2 or 23 and a method of obtaining a lipoxygenase by screening a eukaryotic DNA library using the probe based on SEQ ID NO: 2.
Further, the invention provides a dough composition comprising a manganese lipoxygenase and a method for preparing a dough or a baked product made from dough, comprising adding a manganese lipoxygenase to the dough. The invention also provides a method of oxygenating a substrate selected from the group consisting of linolenic acid, ara-chidonic acid, linoleyl alcohol and a linoleic acid ester comprising contacting the substrate in the presence of oxygen with a manganese lipoxygenase. Finally, the invention provides a detergent composition comprising a manganese lipoxygenase and a surfactant.
DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION
Genomic DNA source
DNA encoding the lipoxygenase (LOX) may be derived from fungi, particularly Ascomycota, more particularly Ascomycota incertae sedis e.g. Magnaporthaceae, such as Gaeumannomyces, or anamorphic Magnaporthaceae such as Pyricularia, or alternatively anamorphic Ascomycota such as Geotrichum. An example is G. graminis, e.g. G. graminis van graminis, G. graminis van avenae or G. graminis vantritici, particularly the strain G.

graminis van graminis CBS 903.73, G. graminis var. avenae CBS 870.73 or G. graminis var.tritici CBS 905.73. The CBS strains are commercially available from Centraalbureau voor Schimmelcultures, Baam, the Netherlands.
The inventors obtained two LOX-encoding DNA sequences from strains of Gaeu-mannomyces graminis and found that they have the sequences shown in SEQ ID NO: 1 and 22. They inserted a LOX-encoding gene into a strain of Escherichia coli and deposited it as E. coli DSM 13586 on 5 July 2000 under the terms of the Budapest Treaty with the DSMZ -Deutsche Sammlung von Microorganismen und Zellkulturen GmbH, Mascheroder Weg 1 b, D-38124 Braunschweig DE, Germany. The deposit was made by Novo Nordisk A/S and was later assigned to Novozymes A/S.
Lipoxygenase
The lipoxygenase of the invention is a manganese lipoxygenase, i.e. it has lipoxygenase activity (EC 1.13.11.12) with manganese in the prosthetic group. It is glycosylated and may have a molecular weight in the range 90-110 kDa, particularly 95-105 kDa. It is thermostable with a temperature optimum of 65-90°C, particularly 75-85°C. The lipoxygenase is stable against LAS (linear alkyl-benzene sulfonate) up to 400 ppm at pH 10. Mn-Lipoxygenase is enzymatically active between pH 5-12 with a broad optimum at pH 6-8.
A recombinant lipoxygenase may have a higher glycosylation and a higher thermostability. The recombinant lipoxygenase may have a molecular weight in the range 90-110 kDa, particularly 95-105 kDa. It may have a temperature optimum of 65-90°C, particularly 75-85°C.
Recombinant expression vector
The expression vector of the invention typically includes control sequences encoding a promoter, operator, ribosome binding site, translation initiation signal, and, optionally, a selectable marker, a transcription terminator, a repressor gene or various activator genes. The vector may be an" autonomously replicating vector, or it may be integrated into the host cell genome.
Production by cultivation of transformant
The lipoxygenase of the invention may be produced by transforming a suitable host cell with a DNA sequence encoding the lipoxygenase, cultivating the transformed organism under conditions permitting the production of the enzyme, and recovering the enzyme from the culture.
The host organism may be a eukaryotic cell, in particular a fungal cell, such as a yeast cell or a filamentous fungal cell, e.g. a strain of Aspergillus, Fusarium, Trichoderma or Saccharomyces, particularly A. niger, A. oryzae, F graminearum, F. sambucinum, F cerealis or S. cerevisiae. The production of the lipoxygenase in such host organisms may be

done by the genera! methods described in EP 238,023 (Novo Nordisk), WO 96/00787 (Novo Nordisk) or EP 244,234 (AIko).
Nucleotide probe
A nucleotide probe may be designed on the basis of the DNA sequence of SEQ ID NO: 1 or the polypeptide sequence of SEQ ID NO: 2, particularly the mature peptide part. The probe may be used in screening for LOX-encocfing DNA as described below.
A synthetic oligonucleotide primer may be prepared by standard techniques (e,g, as described in Sambrook J, Fritsch EF, Maniatis T (1989) Molecular cloning: a laboratory manual (2nd edn.) Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, Cold Spring Harbor, New York) on the basis of the mature part of the amino add sequence in SEQ ID NO: 2 or the corresponding part of the DNA sequence. It may be a degenerate probe and will typically contain at least 20 nucleotides.
Screening of eukaryotic DNA library
A polypeptide with lipoxygenase activity may be obtained by a method comprising:
a) preparing a eukaryotic DNA library,
b) screening the library to select DNA molecules which hybridize to the probe described above,
c) transforming host cells with the selected DNA molecules,
d) cultivating the transformed host cells to express polypeptides encoded by the DNA molecules, and
e) assaying the expressed polypeptides to select polypeptides having lipoxygenase activity.
The eukaryotic DNA library may be prepared by conventional methods. It may include genomic DNA or double-stranded cDNA derived from suitable sources such as those described above.
Molecular screening for DNA sequences may be carried out by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) followed by hybridization.
In accordance with well-known procedures, the PCR fragment generated in the molecular screening may be isolated and subcloned into a suitable vector. The PCR fragment may be used for screening DNA libraries by e.g. colony or plaque hybridization.
Hybridization
The hybridization is used to indicate that a given DNA sequence is analogous to a nucleotide probe corresponding to a DNA sequence of the invention. The hybridization may be done at low, medium or high stringency. One example of hybridization conditions is described in detail below.

Suitable conditions for determining hybridization between a nucleotide probe and a homologous DNA or RNA sequence involves presoaking of the filter containing the DNA fragments or RNA in 5 x SSC (standard saline citrate) for 10 min, and prehybrid/zation of the filter in a solution of 5 x SSC (Sambrook et al. 1989), 5 x Denhardfs solution (Sambrook et al. 1989), 0.5 % SDS and 100/yg/ml of denatured sonicated salmon sperm DNA (Sambrook et al. 1989), followed by hybridization in the same solution containing a random-primed (Feinberg, A. P. and Vogelstein, B. (1983) AnaL Biochem. 132:6-13), 32P-dCTP-labeled (specific activity > 1 x 109 cpm/µ g ) probe for 12 hours at approx. 45DC. The fitter is then washed two times for 30 minutes in 2 x SSC, 0.5 % SDS at a temperature of at least 55DC, particularly at least 60DC, more particularly at least 65DC, e.g. at least 70DC, or at least 75DC.
Molecules to which the oligonucleotide probe hybridizes under these conditions are detected using an x-ray film.
Alignment and identity
The nucleotide sequence of the invention may have an identity to the disclosed sequence of at least 75 % or at least 85 %, particularly at least 90 % or at least 95 %, e.g. at least 98 %.
For purposes of the present invention, alignments of sequences and calculation of identity scores were done using a Needieman-Wunsch alignment (i.e. global alignment), useful for both protein and DNA alignments. The default scoring matrices BLOSUM50 and the identity matrix are used for protein and DNA alignments respectively. The penalty for the first residue in a gap is -12 for proteins and -16 for DNA, while the penalty for additional residues in a gap is -2 for proteins and -4 for DNA. Alignment is from the FASTA package version v20u6 (W. R. Pearson and D. J. Lipman (1988), "Improved Tools for Biological Sequence Analysis", PNAS 85:2444-2448, and W. R. Pearson (1990) "Rapid and Sensitive Sequence Comparison with FASTP and FASTA", Methods in Enzymology, 183:63-98).
Use of lipoxygenase
A manganese lipoxygenase such as that described above may be used in the following application, e.g. in analogy with the indicated publications.
The lipoxygenase can be used as an additive to dough for baked products such as bread, biscuits and cakes. Thus, the lipoxygenase can be used in a process for making bread, comprising adding the lipoxygenase to a dough, kneading the dough and baking the dough to make the baked product. SU 426640 A, JP 58190346 A[SLK1], JP 1165332 A[SLK2], JP 8322456,[SLK3] JP 10028516[SLK4], JP 08322456, JP 2964215. It can also be used in the preparation of noodles as described in JP 11299440 A.
The lipoxygenase may be used for bleaching, e.g. bleaching of beta-carotene, wheat flour or wheat dough. US 1,957,333 -1,957,337.

It can also be used for oxidizing mixtures of fatty acids to hydroperoxy fatty acids, as accelerators of lipid peroxidation, and as analytic tools to estimate linoleic and linolenic acids contents of certain oils.
The invention provides a detergent composition comprising the lipoxygenase and a surfactant, particularly an anionic surfactant such as LAS (linear alkyl-benzene sulfonate). Advantageously, the lipoxygenase has good stability in the presence of such surfactants. The detergent may be formulated as described in US 3635828 [SLK5]or US 5789362JSLK6]. The lipoxygenase can also be used to bleach stains from fabrics or hard surfaces as described in DK 9800352[SLK7], Advantageously,
The lipoxygenase can be used for modification of starch as mentioned in JP 09163953, EP772980, JP 2000-106832. Also it can be used for protein modification as described in EP 947142, DE 19840069 or JP 61078361, or modification of oil (production of conjugated fatty acid) as mentioned in JP 5905128, US 3729379.
The lipoxygenase can be used for cross-linking a protein by oxidases, such as lac-case, bilirubin oxidase etc. EP 947142.
The lipoxygenase can be used to obtain improved glutinousness and improved flavor of marine paste product such as Kamaboko, Hanpen, by adding lipoxygenase to fish meat. JP 61078361.
The lipoxygenase can be used to produce a process tomato product. It can be used for tomato pasta, salsa, ketchup and so on. EP 983725.
The lipoxygenase can be used for production of hydroperoxy fatty acid by reacting lipoxygenase with unsaturated 4-24C fatty acid. JP 11029410.
The hydroperoxides of linoleic acid or linolenic acid can be converted further to e.g. growth regulatory hormone jasmonic acid, and the product from arachidonic acid can be converted to physiological effectors leukotrienes and lipoxins.
Application of lipoxygenase should not be limited to the examples mentioned above. Since hydroperoxide, the product of lipoxygenase reaction, is good oxidant to create radical, lipoxygenase can be used for any other applications utilizing oxidation reaction, such as bleaching of food material or textile dyes, or polymerization of chemical compounds to produce plastic material or fiber.
Assay for lipoxygenase activity
The lipoxygenase activity was determined spectrophotometrically at 25°C by monitoring the formation of hydroperoxides. For the standard analysis, 10 //L enzyme was added to a 1 mL quartz cuvette containing 980 //L 25 mM phosphate buffer (pH 7.0) and 10 //L of substrate solution (10 mM linolenic acid dispersed with 0.2%(v/v) Tween20). The enzyme was typically diluted sufficiently to ensure a turn-over of maximally 10% of the added substrate within the first minute. The absorbance at 234 nm was followed and the rate was esti-

mated from the linear part of the curve. One unit causes an increase in absorbance at 234 nm of 0.001/min.
Determination of substrate specificity
The substrate specificity of the lipoxygenase was studied using the standard assays condition with a number of different compounds as substrate. All substrates were produced as dispersions with 0.2%(v/v) Tween20. The amount of compound added to make up these stock solutions was determined by mass, since viscosity made accurate measurement of volume impossible. The limiting rate constant and the specificity constant were determined by varying the amount of substrate added in the assays. The resulting rates were plotted against the concentration of substrate used. Finally, the plots were fitted by non-linear least squares regression to the theoretical hyperbolic curve of the Michaelis-Menten equation. The cis trans-conjugated hydro(pero)xy fatty acids were assumed to have a molecular extinction coefficient of 23,000 M"1cm-1.
EXAMPLES
Materials and Methods
Molecular cloning techniques are described in Sambrook et al. (1989). The following commercial plasmids and E coli strains were used for sub-cloning . and DNA library construction:
pT7Blue (Novagen) pUC19 (TOYOBO, Japan) E coliJM109 (TOYOBO, Japan) E coli DH12D (GIBCO BRL, Life Technologies, USA) The following commercial Kits were used for cDNA cloning; cDNA Synthesis Kit (Takara, Japan) Marathon cDNA Amplification Kit (Clontech, USA) Oligo dT cellulose powder (Invitrogen, Netherlands) Labeling and detection of hybridization probe was done using DIG-labeling and detection Kit (Boehringer Manheim). Nylon membrane Hybond-N+ (Amersham, England) was used for DNA transfer for both southern blotting and colony hybridization.
Media and buffer solution
COVE-ar: per liter 342.3 g sucrose, 20 ml COVE salt solution, 10 mM acrylamide, 15 mM CsCI2, 30 g Agar noble (Difco)
COVE2-ar: per liter 30 g sucrose, 20 ml COVE salt solution, 10 mM acrylamide, 30 g Agar noble (Difco)

COVE salt solution: per liter 26 g KCJ, 26 g MgS04-7H2C\ 76 g KH2P04, 50ml Cove trace metals.
Cove trace metals: per liter 0.04 g NaB4OHaO, 0.4 g CuSCv5H20, 1.2 g FeS04-7H20, 0.7 g MnS04-H20, 0.7 g Na2MoO2H2A 0.7 g ZnS04-7H20.
AMG trace metals: per liter 14.3 g ZnS04-7H20, 2.5 g CuS04-5H20, 0.5 g NiCI2, 13.8 g FeS04, 8.5 g MnS04> 3.0 g citric acid.
YPG: per liter 4 g yeast extract, 1 g KH2PO4, 0.5 g MgS04-7H20, 15 g glucose, pH 6.0.
STC: 0.8 M Sorbitol, 25 mM Tris pH 8,25 mM CaCl2
STPC: 40% PEG4000 in STC buffer.
Cove top agarose: per liter 342.3 g sucrose, 20 ml COVE salt solution, 10 mM Acetamide, 10 g low melt agarose.
MS-9: per liter 30 g soybean powder, 20 g glycerol, pH 6.0.
MDU-2Bp: per liter 45 g maltose-1 HgO, 7 g yeast extract, 12 g KH2P04,1 g MgS04-7H20, 2 g K2S04,5 g Urea, 1 g NaCI, 0.5 ml AMG trace metal solution pH 5.0.
Materials.
alpha-^P-dCTP (3000 Ci/mmol), dNTPs, alpha-33P-ddNTPs, Hybond-N membranes, and DNA labelling beads (-dCTP), T-primed first-strand kit, and Thermo Sequenase kits were from Amersham Pharmacia Biotech (Uppsala, Sweden). TA cloning kits were from
1,
Invitrogen (Groningen, The Netherlands). Taq DNA polymerase and the enhanced avian RT-PCR kit were from Sigma (St. Louis, MO). Restriction enzymes were from New England Bio-Labs (Beverly, MA). G. graminis was obtained and grown as described by Su and Oliw {supra). Qiagen plant RNeasy mini and QIAquick gel extraction kits were from Merck Eurolab (Stockholm, Sweden). Degenerate primers for PCR were obtained from TIB Molbiol (Berlin, Germany), whereas sequencing primers were purchased from CyberGene (Huddinge, Sweden). 5'-RACE and reverse transcription of total RNA was performed with a kit (5'RACE system for rapid amplification of cDNA ends) from Life Technologies (Taby, Sweden).
Example 1: Determination of partial peptide sequences of LOX from G. graminis
A fungal strain of Gaeumannomyoes graminis var. tritid was cultivated and lipoxygenase was recovered essentially as described in Chao Su and Ernst K Oliw, J. Biological Chemistry, 273 (21), 13072-13079 (1998).
To obtain data from the N-terminal part of the enzyme, approximately 10 mg of enzyme was analyzed directly by using traditional edman degradation on the 494 Protein Sequencer, Applied Biosystems according to the manufacturer's instructions.
Another 40 microgram of sample was lyophilized down to around 20 µ J and added 20 µ l SDS-sample buffer containing DTT before incubation 30 min at 37°C and then boiling the sample for 3 min. 5 µ l 0.5 M iodoacetamide in 1 M Tris-HCI, pH 7.5 was then added and

the sample was incubated 20 min at room temperature prior to running the sample on SDS-PAGE (4-20 %, Novex) according to the manufacturer's instructions. The gel was stained according to standard procedures from Novex.
The gelpiece (60 kDa) was subsequently cut out and minced with a blade. The gel pieces were washed 2X in 0.5 M tris pH 9.2/ACN (1:1) for 45 min at 37°C. The gel pieces were treated with 100% ACN for 10 min to introduce shrinking of the pieces. The ACN was removed and the pieces dries in speed-Vac. 200 ml 0.1 M NH4C03 (AMBIC) was added and incubated for 15 min. AMBIC was removed and 100 ml ACN added. Again incubation for 10 min followed by removal of ACN and drying in speed-vac. The cycle with AMBIC was repeated 2X. After the last drying step 20ml 0.05 mg/ml trypsin in 0.1 M tris pH 9.2, 10% ACN was added. Incubation for 10 min. Then 300 ml 0.1 M tris pH 9.2, 10% ACN was added. Incubation was continued O.N. at 37°C. The supernatant was then removed (saved for control) and the peptides extracted from the gel by adding 30 ml 10 % TFA. After 5 min the TFA was withdrawn and collected. Further extraction was done 2 X by adding 150 ml 0.1% TFA, 60% ACN to the gel pieces and incubate for 30 min at 37°C. All extracts were collected (30ml+150ml+150 ml) and concentrated in the speed-vac to 50 ml. A sample of the concentrate (5 ml) was run on RP-HPLC on a Vydac C-18 column using solvent system of TFA/isopropanol to se if any peptides were present. The rest of the sample was run to collect the peptides. Controls with blank gel pieces were run in parallel. To minimize loss of peptide, selected fractions were sequenced directly without any repurification.
The resulting N-terminal sequence is shown as SEQ ID NO: 21, and two internal peptides (denoted fr 29 and 34) are shown as SEQ ID NOS: 19 and 20.
Further, around 100 µ g lipoxygenase was added 40 fxl 0.05 M potassium phosphate, 10 mM EDTA, 1% Triton X-100, 0.05% SDS, pH 7.3 and heated to 90°C for 4 min and allowed to cool. Then the sample was added 25 mil O-glycosidase (BSA free) and 800 mU EndoF glycosidase (Boehringer) and left over night at 37°C. The sample was then added 75 µ SDS sample buffer and run on SDS-PAGE (Novex 4-20%) in 7 lanes according to the manufacturer's instructions.
The 60 kDa bands were cut out from the gel minced and washed twice in eppendorf tubes with 400 µ of 0.5 M Tris-HCI, pH 9.2:ACN 1:1 for 45 min at 37°C. The gel pieces were then treated with 200 pi ACN for 10 min and then dried in the speed vac. 400 yd NH4HC03 was added and left for 10 min before removing the supernatant and treating the pieces with another 200 joJ of ACN for 10 min and then drying. 400 µ l H20 was added and the sample left for 10 min before repeating the procedure with ACN again. The gel pieces was then added 25 joJ 0.1 mg/ml trypsin + 300 µ l0.1 M Tris-HCI, 10% ACN, pH 9.2 and left over night at 37°C. After incubation 35 µ L of 10 TFA was added and the supernatant were taken after 30 min for HPLC (Vydac C18, gradient to 80% acetonitril in 0.1 % TFA). The gel pieces were then further extracted twice with 150 µ l 0.1 % TFA, 60 % acetonitril. The supernatant was

taken and evaporated in the speed vac to around 5Q pj before adding further 100 JJL! 0.1% TFA and then re-evaporating down to 50 pJ which was then run on the HPLC.
Three amino acid sequences (denoted fr 20, 21 and 25) were obtained, as shown in SEQIDNOS:16, 17 and 18.
Example 2: Cloning of genomic and cDNA clone of LOX from G. graminis
Preparation of fungal chromosomal DNA
A fungal strain Gaeumannomyces graminis var. tritid was cultivated in the YPG (composed per liter 4 g Yeast extract, 1 g KH2PO4, 0.5 g MgS04 7H20, 15 g Glucose, pH 6.0) with gentle agitation at 25°C for 6 days. Mycelia was collected by filtration using Mira-cloth (Calbiochem, USA) and washed with deionized water twice. After briefly dried on paper filter, mycelia was frozen by liquid nitrogen and ground by motor on dry ice. Around 0.2g ground mycelia was put into a 1.5ml eppendorf tube and suspended in 0.5ml of buffer solution composed with 100mM NaCI, 25mM EDTA, 1% SDS and 50mM Tris-HCI (pH8). After addition of 3 micro-I of 25mg/ml proteinase K, the tube was incubated at 65°C for 30-60 minutes. The solution was extracted with the same volume of phenol and DNA was precipitated with 0.7 volume of isopropanol at -20°C. The pellet was re-suspended in 0.5ml of sterilized water and remaining RNA was digested by 50 micro-g of RNase at 37°C for 30 minutes. DNA was phenol extracted and ethanol precipitated again. The pellet was re-suspended in appropriate amount of sterilized water.
Preparation of mRNA and synthesis of cDNA
A fungal strain Gaeumannomyces graminis van tritici was cultivated in the YPG with gentle agitation at 25°C for 6 days. After the lipoxygenase activity was confirmed, mycelia was collected and ground on dry ice as mentioned before to be used for the preparation of total RNA with phenol-chloroform method. Purification of mRNA from total RNA was performed with Oligo dT cellulose powder (Invitrogen, Netherland).
Synthesizing of cDNA was done with cDNA Synthesis Kit (Takara, Japan). The first
strand cDNA was synthesized using 5-6 micro-g of heat denatured mRNA as the template in
»
the mixture containing 1.0 mM each of dNTP, 4 pg of oligo(dT)i8 and 2 pg of random primer and 100 U of reverse transcriptase and 1st strand synthesis buffer. In total 50 pi of reaction mixture was kept at room temperature for 10 min, then incubated at 42^0 for 1 hour. After the incubation, the reaction mixture was chilled on ice for 2 min and subjected to 2nd strand cDNA synthesis. 1138 U of E coli DNA polymerase and 5 pi of Ecoli RNase HIE. coli DNA ligase mixture and 2nd DNA synthesis buffer was added to the 1 * strand synthesis mixture and diluted up to 240 pi with DEPC-H20. The reaction mixture was incubated at 12^ 1 hour, 229C 1 hour and 70gC 10 min. Then 10 U of T4 DNA polymerase was added to the reaction

mixture and incubated at 37-C 10 min. Synthesized cDNA.was subjected to agarose gel . electrophoresis to confirm the quality.
Isolation of a partial clone of LOX gene by PCR
The following primers were designed and synthesized based on the amino acid sequences determined in Example 1. The nucleotide sequence of linoleate diol synthase of Gaeumannomyces graminis (Genbank Accession #: AF124979) was used as a reference of codon usage.
Primer 1 for N-term side: SEQ ID NO: 9 (corresponding to amino acids 1-5 of N-terminalSEQIDNO:21).
Primer 2 for Oterm side 1: SEQ ID NO: 10 (corresponding to amino acids 18-25 of fr 34, SEQ ID NO: 20).
Primer 3 for Oterm side 2: SEQ ID NO: 11 (corresponding to amino adds 6-15 of fr 34, SEQ ID NO: 20).
Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was employed using 0.6 pg of chromosomal DNA of G.graminis as the template in 50 micro-! reaction mixture containing 2.5 mM each of dNTP, 20 pmol each of primer 1 and 2, 2.5 units of LA taq polymerase (Takara, Japan) and GC buffer I supplied by Takara for LA taq. Reaction condition was shown below. LA taq polymerase was added to the reaction mixture after step 1.

Second PCR reaction was employed in the reaction mixture described above but using 2 µlof first PCR product as template and primer 3 instead of primer 2. Reaction condition was the same as described above except step 2 to step 4 were repeated 30 times.
Amplified 1kb fragment was gel-purified using QIAquick™ Gel Extraction Kit (Qiagen) and subcloned into pT7Blue. Sequence of the PCR clone was determined as shown in SEQ ID NO: 3. From the deduced amino acid sequence of the PCR fragment, the primer 1 turned out to be hybridized to elsewhere than expected, however, amino acid sequence 250599Bfr25 (SEQ ID NO: 18) determined in Example 1 was found in continuous 216 amino acids sequence in the PCR fragment (SEQ ID NO: 8). Identity search showed that the 216 amino acid sequence had the highest identity to Human 15S Lipoxygenase (Genbank U78294,

GENESEQP W93832), Human arachidonate 12-Upoxygenase (Swiss-Prot P1-8054) and Plexaura homomalla 8R-Lipoxygenase (GenBank AF003692, SPTREMBL 016025). The results indicated that the obtained PCR fragment contained lipoxygenase gene. The highest score of identity was obtained with Human 15S and was less than 25 %.
Cloning of genomic LOX gene
To obtain a full-length genomic clone, southern blotting was employed on genomic DNA of G.graminis using PCR fragment as a probe. Based on the result, genomic DNA was digested with Sah and separated on 1.0% agarose gel. Around 6 kb of DNA digestion was recovered from the gel and figated with BAP treated pUCl9 fineared by San. Ligation mixture was transformed into E.coli DH12S to construct a partial genomic library. It was screened by colony hybridization using the PCR fragment as probe, and a positive E.coli colony was isolated and the plasmid, termed pSG16, was recovered. The plasmid pSG16 contained a 6 kb Sail fragment from G.graminis. Out of 6kb of this fragment, sequence of 4.1 kb length including the PCR clone was determined as shown in SEQ ID NO: 4. The largest open reading frame (ORF) contained the above-mentioned 216 amino acid sequence as well as the similar sequences to f r 20, 21, 29 and 34, SEQ ID NOS: 16, 17, 19 and 20 but not the N-terminal sequence (SEQ ID NO: 21) determined in example 1. Two other small ORFs were found in the upstream of the largest ORF, but none of them had the N-terminal sequence neither. To find the right initial ATG codon, cDNA cloning was necessary.
Isolation of cDNA clone of LOX gene
Total RNA was extracted from the mycelia producing lipoxygenase and subjected for mRNA preparation by Oligo dT cellulose powder. The cDNA was synthesized from the mRNA using cDNA Synthesis Kit (Takara, Japan) and aiming to obtain full-length cDNA, 1-4kb of cDNA was gel-purified to be subjected for the construction of a partial cDNA library. Library was constructed by ligating with the adaptor of Marathon cDNA Amplification Kit (C)ontech, USA), which allows the amplification of aimed cDNA with the Adaptor Primer (AP1) and a custom primer designed for the internal sequence of aimed clone.
For the amplification of cDNA of LOX, two primers, primer 4 (SEQ ID NO: 12) and primer 5 (SEQ ID NO: 13), were designed based on the sequence of genomic clone. C-terminal part was amplified with primer 4 and AP1, and N-terminal part was amplified with primer 5 and AP1.
PCR reaction mixture comprised of 2.5 mM dNTP, 30 pmol each of primer 4 and AP1 or primer 5 and AP1, 5 units of LA taq polymerase (Takara) and supplied GC buffer I. Reaction condition was shown below. LA taq polymerase was added to the reaction mixture after step 1.


*Step 2 to Step 4 were repeated 15 times and the temperature of Step 3 was decreased 4°C after each 3 repeat. Step 6 to Step 8 were repeated 20 times.
As the results, 0.6kb and 1.6kb fragments were amplified for 5'-end and 3'-end respectively and the sequences were determined as shown in SEQ ID NO: 5 and SEQ ID NO: 6. Based on the sequence around the predicted initial ATG and stop codon TAA, the primer 6 (SEQ ID NO: 14) and primer 7 (SEQ ID NO: 15) were designed for the amplification of end-to-end cDNA. Also desired restriction enzyme sites were introduced at both ends for further plasmid construction.
Reaction mixture contained 0.08 pg of cDNA library, 2.5mM dNTP, 30 pmol each of primer 6 and 7, 1 units of LA taq polymerase (Takara) and GC buffer. Reaction condition was shown below. LA taq polymerase was added to the reaction mixture after step 1.
PCR amplified 1.9 kb fragment was isolated and cloned into pT7Blue resulting in pSG26. Sequence of the full-length cDNA was determined. The deduced open reading frame consisted of 1857bp, which corresponded to 618 amino acids and a molecular mass of 67600 Da. Comparison with the genomic sequence turned out that the LOX gene contained one intron in the N-terminal side. Predicted N-terminal sequence by signal sequence determination program is "ALPLAAEDAAAT. Identity search with the full-length amino acid se-

quence snowed that it had the highest identity to Human 15S Lipoxygenase (Genbank Accession number W93832), less than 25 %.
The plasmid pSG26 was transformed in E. coli JM109 and deposited at DSMZ as DSM 13586 with the accession date 5th July 2000.
Example 3: Expression of G.graminis LOX in A oryzae
Host organism
Aspergillus oryzae BECh2 is described in Danish patent application PA 1999 01726. it is a mutant of JaL228 (described in W098/123000), which is a mutant of IF04177.
Transformation of A orvzae
Aspergillus oryzae strain BECh2 was inoculated in 100 ml of YPG medium and incubated at 32°C for 16 hours with stirring at 80 rpm. Grown mycefia was collected by filtration followed by washing with 0.6 M KCI and re-suspended in 30 ml of 0.6 M KCI containing Glucanex® (Novo Nordisk) at the concentration of 30 pl/ml. The mixture was incubated at 32°C with the agitation at 60 rpm until protoplasts were formed. After filtration to remove the remained mycelia, protoplasts were collected by centrifugation and washed with STC buffer twice. The protoplasts were counted with a hematitometer and re-suspended in a solution of STC:STPC:DMSO (8:2:0.1) to a final concentration of 1.2 x 107 protoplasts/ml. About 4 pg of DNA was added to 100 pi of protoplast solution, mixed gently and incubated on ice for 30 minutes. 1 pi STPC buffer was added to the mixture and incubated at 37°C for another 30 minutes. After the addition of 10 ml of Cove top agarose pre-warmed at 50°C, the reaction mixture was poured onto COVE-ar agar plates. The plates were incubated at 32°C for 5 days.
SDS-PAGE
SDS polyacrylamide electrophoresis was carried out using the commercialized gel PAGEL AE6000 NPU-7.5L (7.5T%) with the apparatus AE-6400 (Atto, Japan) following the provided protocol. 15 µ i of sample was suspended in 15 pi of 2x cone, of sample loading buffer (100 mM Tris-HCI (pH 6.8), 200 mM Dithiothrertol, 4% SDS, 0.2% Bromophenol blue and 20% glycerol) and boiled for 5 minutes. 20 pi of sample solution was applied to a polyacrylamide gel, and subjected for electrophoresis in the running buffer (25 mM Tris, 0.1% SDS, 192 mM Glycine) at 20 mA per gel. Resulting gel was stained with Copmassie brilliant blue.
Construction of expression plasmid
The plasmid pSG26 containing cDNA of G.graminis LOX was digested by Bgh\ and Xho] and 1.9 kb of fragment which contained the LOX gene was ligated with pMT2188 digested with BamH\ and Xho\. The plasmid pMT2188 has a modified Aspergillus niger neutral

amylase promoter, Aspergillus nidulans TPI leader sequence, Aspergillus niger glucoamy-lase terminator, Aspergillus nidulans amdS gene as a marker for fungal transformation and S.cerevisiae ura3 as the marker for E.coli transformation. Transformation was done with E. coli DB6507 in which pyrF gene is deficient and can be complemented with S.cerevisiae Ura3. Resulting plasmid was termed pSG27.
Expression of G.Qraminis LOX in A. oryzae
A. oryzae BECh2 was transformed with the plasmid pSG27 and selection positive transformants were isolated. Transformants were grown on COVE 2 -ar at 32-C for 5 days and inoculated to 100 ml of MS-9 shaking flask. After the cultivation with vigorous agitation at 32°C for 1 day, 3 ml of each culture was transferred to 100 ml of MDU-2Bp in shaking flask to cultivate at 32°C for 3 days. Culture broth was centrifuged at 3500 rpm for 10 minutes and supernatant was collected. Lipoxygenase activities of the supernatant were determined spectrophotometrically as described before. Positive transformants showed about 50,000U/ml culture broth while untransformed A oryzae BECh2 showed no activity. Culture supernatant was also subjected to SDS-PAGE analysis. Positive transformants showed 90-110 kDa smear band which indicated the protein was heavily glycosylated. Untransformed Aoryzae BECh2 did not show any major band.
Example 4: Purification of recombinant lipoxygenase
One gram of crude lyophilised lipoxygenase prepared as in the previous example was dissolved in 40 mL 25 mM Tris-HCl (pH 8.0) and then filtered (0.45 //m, type Millex-HV, Millipore). The above and subsequent steps were all carried out at room temperature. The filtrate was loaded on a SP-Sepharose Fast Flow (2.6 x 14 cm) with 25 mM Tris-HC! (pH 8.0) at 1 mL/min. The column was then washed with the same buffer at 2.5 mL/min until baseline was reached (approximately 4 column volumes). The bound protein was then eluted with a linear gradient from 0 to 330 mM NaCI in 25 mM Tris-HCl (pH 8.0) in 2 column volumes. Fractions of 10 mL were collected. The column was cleaned with 1 M NaCI in 25 mM Tris-HCl (pH 8.0). The fractions containing the majority of pure lipoxygenase, as estimated by SDS-PAGE and by activity assay, were pooled and concentrated using an Amicon cell (10,000 NMWL, YM10, Millipore). The enzyme was finally transferred into 50 mM sodium phosphate (pH 7.0) by dialysis and stored in aliquots at -20°C until use.
SDS-PAGE analysis showed that the lipoxygenase had been purified to homogeneity. The enzyme was found to have an estimated molecular weight of 90-110 kDa, somewhat higher than the theoretical value based on the amino acid sequence (65.6 kDa). This was taken as an indication of glycosyiation. The protein was found to have a very high isoelectric point as demonstrated by the successful purification employing cation exchange chromatography.

Example 5: Determination of the gene and the deduced protein sequence of Mn-lipoxygenase
1. Amino acid sequences of internal peptides and the C-terminal amino acids of manganese
lipoxygenase
Manganese lipoxygenase was purified to homogeneity as described by Su and Oliw {supra), using a strain of G. graminis (different from the previous examples). Internal peptides were generated, purified and sequenced by the Sanger method essentially as described for another protein of G, graminis (Homsten L, Su C, Osbourn AE, Garosi P, Hell-man U, Wernstedt C and Oliw EH, Cloning of linoteate cSo) synthase reveals homology with prostaglandin H synthases. J Biol Chem 274(40): 28219-24, 1999). The N-terminal amino acid of Mn-lipoxygenase was blocked, but four C-terminal amino acid was obtained by O terminal sequencing.
(I) C terminal amino add sequence These C-terminal amino acids were FLSV.
(iO Internal amino acid sequences
The following eight internal amino acid sequences were obtained (where (K), (K/R) and (E) denotes the fact that Lys-C, trypsin and V8 cleaves peptides at the C-terminal side of K residues, K or R residues, and E residues, respectively):
(K)LYTPQPGRYAAACQGLFYLDARSNQFLPLAIK (amino acids 205-237 of SEQ ID NO: 23 with the substitution K206L)
(K/R)HPVMGVLNR (amino acids 295-304 of SEQ ID NO: 23 with Lys or Arg at position 295)
(KZR)LFLVDHSYQK (amino acids 196-205 of SEQ ID NO: 23 with Lys or Arg at position 196)
(E)M?AGRGFDGKGLSQG(W/M)PFV (amino acids 569-587 of SEQ ID NO: 23, except that amino acid 570 is uncertain Met and amino acid 584 is Trp or Met)
(KZR)GLVGEDSGPR (amino acids 365-375 of SEQ ID NO: 23 except that amino acid 365 was found to be Lys or Arg and 368 Val)
(K)TNVGADLTYTPLD/AD/WK/LP/ND/NE (amino acids 237-255 of SEQ ID NO: 23 except that amino acid 242 was found to be Ala, 250 Asp or Ala, 251 and Asp or Trp)
(K)6/F SGVLPLHPAw (amino acids 472-483 of SEQ ID NO: 23, except that amino acid 473 was found to be Gly or Phe, and amino acid 483 uncertain Trp)
(K) QTVDDAFAAPDLLAGNGPGRA (amino acids 532-553 of SEQ ID NO: 23 except that amino acid 536 was found to be Asp, and 552 Arg)
2. RT-PCR with degenerate primers generated cDNA of Mn-lipoxygenase
This part of the invention was difficult'due to the high GC content of the genome of G. graminis.

Methods for isolation of total RNA from G. graminis and transcription of mRNA to . cDNA had to be optimised. cDNA was often contaminated with genomic DNA in spite of digestion with DNAses and other precautions.
After considerable experimentation, using over 30 degenerate primers in various combinations, the first cDNA clone of Mn-lipoxygenase could be obtained by RT-PCR. It was obtained by the following degenerate primers, which were based on internal peptides 1 and 2 and above.
Mn60 (5-AACCAGTTCX:TSCCSCTCGCSATCAA)
Mn15R (5-GTCGAGGTAGAAGAGGCCCTGRCAVGC),
E03a (5'-CATCCSGTSATGGGYGTSCTBAA)
EOr3a (5-CGGTTSAGGACRCCCATVACVGGRTG).
The primers Mn60 and EOr3A generated an RT-PCR band of about 230-bp and the primers E03A and Mnl5R generated an RT-PCR band of about 220-bp. A sense primer from this sequence (MnS2: 5'-CCGTTCAGCGTCGAGAGCAAGG) and an antlsense primer from the other sequence (MnS1, 5'-TCTCGGGGATCGTGTGGAAGAGCA) amplified a fragment of 337-bp. The amplicon was sequenced and it contained the amino acid sequence of peptidel in one of the reading frames. The amplicon was used as probe for Northern blot analysis and for screening of a genomic library (Hornsten et ah, supra).
3. Screening of a genomic library of G. graminis •
A genomic library of G. graminis in Lambda ZAP II was obtained as described by Bowyer P et aiM Science 267(5196): 371-4, 1995. It was screened with a probe of 0.33-kb from the cDNA sequence. Screening of over 100 000 plagues yielded 11 positive clones, which were plague purified by 2-3 additional rounds of phage screening. The Bluescript SK phagemid was excised with helper phage following published methods. Restriction enzyme analysis showed that all rescued phagemids contained the same insert of 8-kb.
4. Seguencing of the gene and coding region of Mn-LO of G graminis
Sequencing was performed of both strands using two different methods based on cycle sequencing. The sequencing was difficult due to the high GC content of the gene (over 60% GC).
3.4-kb of the genome of G. graminis was sequenced and the sequence of 2725 nucleotides of the Mn-lipoxygenase gene included an intron of 133-bp. The gene of Mn-lipoxygenase was identified by 5'-RACE from the starting point of transcription of 2mRNA, a^caggttc, and the protein translation start point A^G (at nucleotide position 72). The O terminal amino acids FLSV were found with the stop codon at position 2060-2062. Over 0.6-kb of the 3'-untranslated region was sequenced and tentative polyadenylation signals were found as shown below:

5-RACE and cDNA sequencing was used to confirm the deduced open reading frame and the exon-intron borders. The transcription start point, the translation start point and the translation end were determined as shown in SEQ ID NO: 22 and 23.
The intron was found to have a length of 133 bp and to have the sequence shown as SEQ ID NO: 24. It was found to be located between nucleotides 372 and 373, i.e. between Ser108 and Arg109 of SEQ ID NO: 22.
Example 6: Expression of native and genetically mocfiffed Mn-lipoxygenase
We have subcloned a genomic seqmerrt (3-kb) containing the coding region of the Mn-lipoxygenase gene from the Bluescript SK phagemid into the multi cloning site (with Spel and NsH sites) of the plasmid pGEM-5Zf (Promega) using the restriction enzymes Spel and NsA.
The 5'-end and the intron were modified as follows. pGEM-5Z with the insert was cleaved with Spel and BseRI, which cut out the 5'-end of the gene and part of the genomic sequence with the intron (1323-bp). This piece was replaced in pGEM with a cDNA sequence of about 405-pb, which was obtained by cleavage of a PCR product of 448-bp with Spel and BseRI. This vector is designated pGEM_Met. The PCR product was generated with a sense primer specific to the translation start region (and with Spel and Atotel site in the 5'-end of the primer, 5'-TTACTAGTCATATGCGCTCCAGGATCCTTGCT), and a gene specific antisense primer located at the 3'-end of the BseRI site. This cDNA part so inserted thus contained the beginning of the ORF (without the Intron positioned between nucleotides 372 and 373, between Ser108 and Arg109, as shown in the table above), so that the entire ORF was obtained in the vector pGEM_Met.
The 3'-end was modified with PCR, taking advantage of an BbvC\ site about 130-bp from the stop signal. The sense primer was gene-specific and located at the 5'-side of the restriction site, whereas the antisense primer was designed from the nucleotides of the terminal amino acids and contained, in addition, Afcfel and NsA restriction sites. The pGEM_Met vector was cleaved with A/s/1 and BbvC1, and the excised fragment was replaced with the PCR product cleaved in the same way. This yielded the vector pGEM-Met_ter. The modified coding region of Mn-lipoxygenase in this vector can thus be excised with A/del. All modifications have been confirmed by sequencing of the expression constructs.
1. Expression of Mn-lipoxygenase in procarvotic cells (E. coli)
The expression vector pET-19b has been linearized with Afcfel, and the modified coding region of Mn-lipoxygenase has been excised with Afcfel and ligated into this vector for expression in E. coli, as suggested by the manufacturer of the pET expression vectors (Stratagene). Studies of recombinant Mn-lipoxygenase expressed in E. coli is now in progress.

2. Expression of Mn-liooxyqenase in eukaryotic cells (Pichia pastoris. Saccharomvces cere-
visiae. Aspergillus nidulans. Gaeumannomvces praminis)
We plan to use the Pichia Expression kit with the pCIC9 or related vectors (Invitro-gen), which has to be slightly modified to fit our modified coding region of Mn-lipoxygenase. It is possible that glycosylation of recombinant Mn-lipoxygenase may differ between different hosts. We therefore plan to investigate a series of eukaryotic expression systems in Sac-charomyces cerevisiae, Aspergillus nidulans, Gaeumannomyces graminis. Glucosylation may improve the stability of the recombinant enzyme.
3. Expression of Mrvlipoxyqenase in eukaryotic cells (insect cells)
We plan to use the Drosophila Expression System (Schneider 2 cells) from fnvrtro-gen using an expression vector without His tags at the Oterminal end.
4. Genetically modified Mn-lipoxygenase for expression.
Our discovery that Mn-lipoxygenase belongs to the lipoxygenase gene family opens large possibilities for rational modification of the structure. The 3D sequence of several lipoxygenases are known and Mn-lipoxygenase shows significant amino acid identity along many a-helices of soybean iipoxygenase-1 (Prigge ST, Boyington JC, Gaffney BJ and Amzel LM, Structure conservation in lipoxygenases: structural analysis of soybean lipoxygenase-1 and modeling of human lipoxygenases. Proteins 24(3): 275-91, 1996), which has been used for modeling of many lipoxygenases. Both the metal ligands and other structurally important amino acids of Mn-lipoxygenase will be mutated in order to increase the bleaching properties and oxidative properties of the enzyme..
4.1 Site directed mutagenesis of amino acids of important alpha-helices.
Amino acid sequences of Mn-lipoxygenase align with a-helix 9 (Prigge et al., supra), which contains the WLLAK sequence and two His residues, which likely are Mn ligands. Systematic changes of amino acids in this helix might have profound effect on enzyme activity and bleaching properties. In the same way, an amino acid sequence of Mn-Lipoxygenase align with a-he)ix 18, which contain iron ligands and likely Mn-Iigands (His and Asn). Other predicted a-helices of Mn-lipoxygenase, which should be mutated, correspond to a-helices 7, 8, 10-17, 19-22 of soybean lipoxygenase-1 (Prigge et al.f supra). We predict that some of these genetically modified Mn-Iipoxygenases may have totally different properties, and the bleaching effect may be enhanced. Predicted Mn ligands thus are 3 His residues, one Asp residue and one Val residue. Mn-lipoxygenase likely belongs to enzymes of the "2-His-1-carboxyl facial triad".
4.2 Site directed mutagenesis of amino acids of the C-terminal end.
We plan to mutate the terminal Val to an lie or to other residues and to determine the bleaching properties of the mutated form.

4.3 Mosaic forms of Mn-lipoxvoenase
In order to improve the properties of Mn-Iipoxygenase we plan substitute various parts with the corresponding sequence of soybean lipoxygenase using the a-helix information described above.
Example 7: Screening of eukaryotic DNA
To screen for homologous lipoxygenase genes in eukaryotic fungal strains, south-em hybridization was performed on the genomic DNA from several fungal strains using cDNA of Gaeumannomyces graminis LOX gene as the probe. Strains of the following species were tested; Pyricularia oryzae, Psaliota campestris, PenictWum roqueforti and Geotrichum candidum ATCC34614. Genomic DNA was isolated as described in Example 2.
The probe was labeled with digoxigenin-dUTP using DIG DNA labeling Mix (Boe-hringer Mannheim) as follows; DIG labeled probe was prepared by PCR using primer 6 (SEQ ID NO: 14) and primer 7 (SEQ ID NO: 15) as the fulWength cDNA of G. graminis LOX. PCR reaction mixture contained 0.1 ug of pSG26 as the template, 1.25mM dNTP, 8% DIG DNA Labeling Mix, 30 pmol each of primer 6 and 7, 1 unit of LA taq polymerase (Takara) and GC buffer. Reaction conditions were as shown below. LA taq polymerase was added to the reaction mixture after step 1.

PCR products were gel-purified and denatured by heating at 98 ^C before use.
About 5 micro-g of DNA digested with restriction enzyme was separated on 1.0% agarose gel and denatured by soaking the gel in 0.2N HC! for 30 minutes and in 0.5N NaOH + 1.5M NaCl for 30 minutes, then and neutralized in 1M Tris (pH 7.5) +1.5M NaCI for 30 minutes. Denatured DNA was then transferred to the nylon membrane by vacuum transfer with 20xSSC for 15 minutes. After fixing by UV irradiation, nylon membrane was used for the hybridization. Hybridization solution was composed with 5xSSC, 0.5% blocking reagent (Boehringer Mannheim), 0.1% N-lauroylsarcosine and 0.02% SDS. The nylon membrane was prehybridized with the hybridization solution at 60°C for 1 hour. After that, the heat-denatured DIG-labeled probe was added to the hybridization solution and incubated at 60°C overnight. Resulting membrane was washed with washing buffer comprising 2xSSC + 0.1%

SDS for 5 minutes at room temperature twice followed by washing with washing buffer 2 composed with O.lxSSC + 0.1% SDS for 15 minutes at hybridization temperature twice. Washed membrane was air-dried and used for the detection of DIG-labeled DNA by following the provided protocol of DNA detection Kit (Boehringer Mannheim).
As the result, Pyricularia oryzae showed clear positive signals and Geotrichum can-didum showed very weak signals. The results indicate that Pyricularia oryzae has a lipoxygenase gene that has a high identity to Gaeumannomyces graminis LOX and Geotrichum candidum has a gene that has low identity to G. graminis LOX.
Example 8: Effect of pH on Mn-lipoxygenase
The activity of lipoxygenase produced as in Example 4 was tested at various pH values. The enzyme was found to have a broad pH optimum with high activity in the range of pH 6-10 or 7-11 with linoieic acid or linolenic acid as substrate.
The stability of the enzyme was determined after 1 hour incubation at 40°C at various pH values. The enzyme was found to have good stability in the pH range 4-10,
Example 9: Substrate specificity of lipoxygenase
The activity of lipoxygenase produced as in Example 4 was tested on various substrates as described above. The results are expressed as kcat (or Vmax), KM and IWKM according to the Michaelis-Menten equation:

Example 10: Bleaching of p-carotene by native Mn-lipoxygenase
Purified Mn-lipoxygenase was used to bleach beta-carotene at pH 4.5, 6.5 and 9.5. The highest bleaching activity was found at pH 6.5.

Example 11: Effect of LAS on Mn-Iipoxygenase
The activity of G. graminis lipoxygenase produced as in Example 4 was measured with LAS up to 400 ppm at pH 7.0 and pH10. The lipoxygenase was found to be fully stable against LAS up to 400 ppm (the highest concentration tested) at pH 7 and 10. This indicates that the lipoxygenase is stable enough at normal washing conditions, typically pH 10 with 200 ppm of LAS.




























WE CLAIM:
A polypeptide having lipoxygenase enzyme activity which:
a) has an amino acid sequence which is identical with the mature polypeptide of SEQ ID NO: 2 or 23;
b) is enclosed by a nucleic acid sequence which hybridizes at 55°C with a complementary strand of the nucleic acid sequence encoding the mature polypeptide of SEQ ED NO: 1 or a subsequence thereof having at least 100 nucleotides;
c) is encoded by the lipoxygenase-encoding part of the DNA sequence cloned into a plasmid in Escherichia coli deposit number DSM 13586.
A polynucleotide which comprises:
a) the partial DNA sequence encoding a mature lipoxygenase cloned into a plasmid present in Escherichia coli DSM 13586,
b) the partial DNA sequence encoding a mature lipoxygenase shown in

SEQ ID NO: 2 or 23,
c) an analogue of the sequence defined in a) or b) which encodes a
lipoxygenase and
i) has at least 50 % identity with said DNA sequence, or
ii) hybridizes at low stringency with a complementary strand of said
DNA sequence or a subsequence thereof having at least 100
nucleotides, iii) is an allelic variant thereof, of
d) a complementary strand of a), b) or c).
The polynucleotide as claimed in the preceding claim wherein the partial DNA sequence is the mature peptide-coding sequence shown in SEQ ID NO: 1 or 22.

4. A nucleic acid construct comprising the polynucleotide of claim 2 or 3 operably linked to one or more control sequences capable of directing the expression of the lipoxygenase in a suitable expression host.
5. A recombinant expression vector comprising the nucleic acid construct of claim 4, a promoter, and transcriptional and translational stop signals.
6. A recombinant microbial host cell transformed with the nucleic acid construct of claim 4 or the vector of claim 5.
7. A method for producing a lipoxygenase comprising

a) cultivating the host cell of claim 6 under known conditions conducive to production of the lipoxygenase, and
b) recovering the lipoxygenase.

8. A dough composition comprising the lipoxygenase as claimed in claim 1.
9. A method for preparing a dough or a baked product made from dough, comprising adding the lipoxygenase as claimed in claim 1 to the dough.
10. A method of oxygenating a substrate selected from the group consisting of linolenic acid, arachidonic acid, linoleyl alcohol and a linoleic acid ester comprising contacting the substrate in the presence of oxygen with the lipoxygenase as claimed in claim 1.
11. The method as claimed in the preceding claim wherein the ester of linoleic acid is methyl linoleate, monolinolein, dililnolein or trililnolein.

12. A detergent composition comprising the lipoxygenase as claimed in claim 1
and a surfactant.
13. The composition of the preceding claim wherein the surfactant comprises
anionic surfactant, particularly linear alkyl benzenesulfonate.




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Patent Number 244711
Indian Patent Application Number 2193/CHENP/2007
PG Journal Number 52/2010
Publication Date 24-Dec-2010
Grant Date 16-Dec-2010
Date of Filing 21-May-2007
Name of Patentee NOVOZYMES A/S
Applicant Address KROGSHOEVEJ 36, DK-2880 BAGSVAERD.
Inventors:
# Inventor's Name Inventor's Address
1 TAKAGI, SHINOBU MAEHARA-NISHI 1-31-1-708, FUNABASHI-SHI, CHIBA 274-0825, JAPAN
2 CHRISTENSEN, SOREN LYSTBADEVEJ 32, DK-4040 JYLLINGE, DENMARK
3 OLIW, ERNST DIV. OF BIOCHEMICAL PHARMACOLONY DEP., PHARMACEUTICAL BOISCIENCES UPPSALA BIOMEDICAL CENT, P O BOX 591, S-751 UPPSALA, SWEDEN
4 SUGIO, AKIKO SHINKOIWA 3-16-16, KATSUSHIKA-KU, TOKYO 124-0024.
5 OSTERGAARD, LARS, FREDENSVEJ 69, 1TH, DK 2920 CHARLOTTENLUND, DENMARK
PCT International Classification Number A21D 10/00
PCT International Application Number PCT/DK01/00574
PCT International Filing date 2001-09-05
PCT Conventions:
# PCT Application Number Date of Convention Priority Country
1 0004790-2 2000-12-22 Sweden