Title of Invention

"A PROCESS FOR THE PREPARATION OF READY-TO-DRINK CARBONATED BEVERAGE FROM RED BEET"

Abstract This invention relates to a process for the preparation of ready-to-drink carbonated beverage from red beet. Use of fruit and vegetable juices in the preparation of carbonated beverages was practically negligible till very recently, although large quantities of aerated waters, ice-sherbets and synthetic drinks containing sweetening agents like saccharin, are consumed all over the country. The synthetic beverages have practically very little or no nutritive value. If real fruit and vegetable juices are popularized instead, the nutritive value of this beverage could be increased considerably, which is a highly desirable objective.
Full Text This invention relates to a process for the preparation of ready-to-drink carbonated beverage from red beet.
The process, in particular, describes the method of preparation of clarified beverage using a membrane-processing technique and subsequent carbonation.
Use of fruit and vegetable juices in the preparation of carbonated beverages was practically negligible till very recently, although large quantities of aerated waters, ice-sherbets and synthetic drinks containing sweetening agents like saccharin, are consumed all over the country. The synthetic beverages have practically very little or no nutritive value. If real fruit and vegetable juices are popularized instead, the nutritive value of this beverage could be increased considerably, which is a highly desirable objective.
Fruit and vegetable juices can be carbonated directly or in the form of ready-to-drink (RTD) beverage. Carbonation adds to the life of a beverage and contributes in some measure to its tang. Carbonated beverages keep well for about a week without addition of any preservative. It is however, necessary to add chemical preservative (sodium benzoate) to the finished product, if the beverages are to be kept for a longer period. Another advantage of carbonation is the removing of air, which results not only in anaerobic condition, but also reduces the oxidation of ascorbic acid.
Reference may be given for preparation of fruit based carbonated drinks from lime, lemon, orange, grape, pomegranate, pineapple etc. (Khurdiya, 1989). In this process, the juice was extracted from the fruits with suitable extraction method followed by keeping overnight at 5° C for sedimentation. Beverages were prepared from the supernatant juice with sugar, acid, preservative, water and then carbonated in bottles. In case of pulpy fruits like banana, apple, guava etc. enzymatic clarification of the pulp was essential to get clear juice. The major drawback of the carbonated fruit and vegetable beverages produced by conventional method is not only the lack of hygiene but also the appearance of the product, wherein there is always serum separation in the bottle during storage.
Very often the addition of cloud stabilizers of chemical nature is much higher than the permissible limit, which may be a health hazard.
Sugar beet and red beet (Beta vulgaris) are two major varieties of the Chenopodiaceae family, of which sugar beet or beet sugar are grown mainly for production of sugar where as the dark red beetroot is generally regarded as a nutrient-rich table vegetable. More than 90% of the red beets produced in the country are consumed as vegetable. The remainder is processed into juice, coloring, foodstuff and food colorant, and the latter commonly known as beetroot red (Henry, 1996). However, potential use of beetroot red may be somewhat limited to dried or refrigerated foods, and foods with a short shelf life because the pigments are subject to change by heat and light. The juice can provide all the basics of human nutrition, including carbohydrates, proteins, fats, vitamins, and minerals.
Reference may be made to Fedorova et al., 1993, wherein preparation of fermented red beet juice using lactic bacteria cultures is described. Beet juice is filtered, heated, and 0.1% ascorbic acid is added before fermentation. Fermented juice is filtered and sterilized. The beverage is dark red and slightly acidic with an appealing aroma.
Reference may be made to Hamburg, 1991, wherein the effect of temperature and pH on the stability of pigments in red beet (Beta vulgaris) was studied. Results suggest that the colour of the pigment betanin is pH dependent and the pigment is relatively heat labile in unprotected systems. Maximum colour stability was at pH 5.0.
Reference may be made to United-States-Patent (US5554227, 1996), United-States-Patent (US6387186B1, 2002), European-Patent-Application (EP0957178A2, 1999), wherein application of membrane processes like MF and UF for purification or clarification of sugar beet juices has been described. The process involves: maceration of beets; mechanical separation of juice from macerated beets; and membrane filtration of separated juice to produce a
retentate and a permeate. However, the production of purified beet juice was intended for sugar manufacture not for beverage making.
Reference may be made to Chorbanov, 1988; Real-del-Sol, 1993, wherein studies were conducted on purification of red beet juice by ultrafiltration to produce a food colorant and also to stabilize the beet root juice colourant in the final concentrate or dried products. The filtered juices had high concentration of pigments, and low concentration of proteins and insoluble solids.
Literature survey and patent search indicates that there has been very little work done on the preparation of ready-to-drink (RTD) beverage from red beet in general and clarified juice in particular.
The main objective of the present invention is to provide a process for the preparation of ready-to-drink carbonated beverage from red beet, which obviates the drawbacks detailed above.
Another object of the present invention is to formulate a drink with reasonable red beet juice.
Yet another object of the invention is to clarify the red beet beverage using microfiltration technique.
Still, another object of the present invention is to bottle and carbonate the clarified clear red beet beverage for shelf stability.
Accordingly,
1. a process for preparation of ready-to-drink carbonated beverage from red beet, comprising:
a) sorting and washing of fully matured red beets;
b) peeling and trimming and cutting of red beet into pieces of 5-6 cm;
c) blanching of cut red beet pieces in presence of steam for about 8-12 minutes;
d) crushing & macerating of steamed red beet to obtain pulp;
e) adjusting the pulp pH to 4.1-4.4 with addition of citric acid;
f) treating the pulp with 0.08%-0.12% pectic enzyme concentrate is carried out at 43°-48° C for 1.30h-2.30h;
g) extraction of the juice is carried out in an hydraulic press;
h) formulating the red beet beverage with the addition of 13%-16% juice, 12%-15% sugar, 0.22%-0.25% citric acid, 0.8-1.5 ppm ginger oil and, 0.006%-0.008% sodium benzoate;
i) clarifying the above red beet beverage in a microfiltration unit using ceramic membrane having 0.2-0.3 Dm pore size at 1.5-2.5 bar pressure and 25°-32° C temperature.
j) cooling the clear red beet beverage to14°-16° C;
k) carbonating the fruit drink with 2-3 volumes of CO2 gas;
In an embodiment the formulated red beet beverage is characterized with 13%-16% juice, 13°-16° brix, 0.22%-0.25% acidity and 0.006%-0.008% sodium benzoate.
In an embodiment the carbonated clear red beet beverage is stored at 22°-30° C to achieve shelf stability for a period of 55-65 days.
The process for preparation of ready-to-drink carbonated beverage from red beet is illustrated in the following flow chart.
(Figure Removed)

Novelty of the process and critical steps
Red beet (Beta vulgaris) is a tropical vegetable. Of all the vegetables, beetroots provide the greatest opportunity for the maximum utilization of the raw material in a variety of economically important products. Attempts have been made to convert the beetroot for various products such as beet colours for various applications like making ice cream, milkshakes, sorbets and wine.
The red beet juice is considered as one of the best vegetable juices. It is a rich source of natural sugar, minerals and vitamins. Red beet pigment is composed of 2 groups of substances, which together form the betalains. They consist of both red (betacyanines) and yellow (betaxanthines) pigments. Betalains are susceptible to the effects of processing and storage during which degradation of pigment occurs (Sobkowska et al., 1991). The betacyanines generally known as betanin or red pigment in the juice has many therapeutic values. Red beet products consumed regularly in the diet may provide protection against certain oxidative stress-related disorders in humans. However, the pigments are subject to change by heat and light. Development of browning, loss of nutrients, sedimentation of pulp, typical earthy (beety) flavour in the red beet juice and instability of pigment during preparation, processing, and storage are the drawbacks which resists the popularity of the juice.
Attempts have been made by many to develop a process for preserving the red beet juice. Yet there is no knowledge/information regarding its manufacture and sale in any form of packaging material commercially. The major drawbacks of conventional red beet juice production are less stability in colour and strong beety flavour (geosmin).
Attempt has been made to remove the pulp completely using membrane technology (microfiltration) so that the subsequent product particularly sparkling clear carbonated beverage could be stable for longer period without much change in the beverage quality during storage. Moreover, the process is hygienic, no involvement of heat, microbiologicaily safe resulting in very clear juice/beverage.
The novelty of the process lies in the combined manner in which critical steps such as enzymatic liquefaction of red beet pulp, formulation of the red beet juice beverage, clarification of the beverage using MF, and carbonation to obtain a high quality sparkling clear ready-to-drink (RTD) beverage with less earthy flavour and more stable colour during storage.
The following example is given by way of illustration of the present invention and therefore should not be considered to limit the scope of the present invention.
Example 1.
Thirty-five kilograms of red beets were cleaned with water, mechanically peeled, cut into pieces, chopped in a fruit mill, homogenized in a prima mixer, adjusted pulp pH to 4.5, treated with pectic enzyme concentrate (0.1% for 2h at 45° C), and pressed out the juice using a hydraulic press. Approximately, 20 kg of juice was collected. The juice was then clarified using a microfiltration unit with 0.2 Dm average pore size, SCT P 1960 ceramic membrane consisting of 19 tubular channels (6 mm i.d.) with a total effective area of 0.3 m2 at operating conditions: 1-3 bar TMP, at 25°-30° C. About 16 kg clear juice was obtained as permeate with a mean permeate flux of 70± 5 kg/h/m2. Clear beetroot beverage of 5 kg was prepared with the specifications: 15% clear juice, 15° brix, 0.25% acidity, 80 ppm sodium benzoate and 1 ppm ginger oil. Materials required for 5 kg beverage were: clear juice, 750g; sugar, 685g; citric acid, 11.75g; sodium benzoate, 0.40g, ginger oil, 5 mg and water, 3.553 kg. Subsequently, this beverage was cooled at 15° C, filled into 150 ml glass bottles, carbonated with CO2 gas (2-3 volumes), crown corked and stored at 30° C.
Example 2.
Ten kilograms of red beets were cleaned with water, mechanically peeled, cut into pieces, chopped in a fruit mill, homogenized in a prima mixer, adjusted pulp pH to 4.5, treated with pectic enzyme concentrate (0.1% for 2h at 45° C), and
pressed out the juice using a hydraulic press. Approximately, 7 kg of juice was collected. 30 kg beetroot juice beverage was prepared with the following specifications (by weight): 15% fresh juice, 15° brix, 0.25% acidity, 80 ppm sodium benzoate and 1 ppm ginger oil. Materials required for 30 kg beverage were: clear juice, 4.5 kg; sugar, 4.125 kg; citric acid, 59.25g; sodium benzoate, 2.4g, 0.03g ginger oil and water, 21.316 kg. The prepared beverage was then clarified using a microfiltration unit with 0.2 Dm average pore size, SCT P 1960 ceramic membrane consisting of 19 tubular channels (6 mm i.d.) with a total effective area of 0.3 m2 at operating conditions: 1-3 bar TMP, at 25°-30° C. About 26 kg clear beverage was obtained as permeate with a mean permeate flux of 90+ 5 kg/h/m2. Subsequently, this beverage was cooled at 15° C, filled into 150 ml glass bottles, carbonated with CO2 gas (2-3 volumes), crown corked and stored at 30° C.
From the above two examples it is observed that:
a. Two methods of red beet beverage preparation have been described (i)
Red beet beverage after MF: the juice is clarified first by MF and then the
clear juice obtained is used for preparation of ready-to-drink red beet
beverage by adding calculated amount of sugar, citric acid, sodium
benzoate, ginger oil and water, and (ii) Red beet beverage prior to MF: the
red beet beverage is prepared first from the extracted red beet juice by
mixing with the calculated amount of sugar, citric acid, sodium benzoate,
ginger oil and water, and then the prepared red beet beverage is clarified
by MF to get clear red beet drink.
b. Comparing the filtration rate (flux), the red beet beverage prepared by the
second method (red beet beverage prior to MF) showed higher than that of
the first method (red beet beverage after MF) and also, the beverage is
ready for direct cooling and filling into bottles and subsequent carbonation
and crown corking.
c. The red beet beverage obtained from the second method was clearer with
acceptable level of red beet and ginger flavours with no significant
degradation of red pigment in the 60 days' stored samples (25-30° C).
Ginger oil was used as a flavouring agent for minimizing the strong beety flavour of the red beet beverage.
d. Carbonation at the rate of 2.3 volumes of the bottled red beet beverage containing 80 ppm sodium benzoic is enough to prevent from microbial spoilage during storage
The main advantages of the present invention are:
a) the MF process provides the juice under hygienic condition
b) very clear beverage with satisfactory level of betanin could be obtained
c) carbonation of the beverage could be an added advantage not only in an increased shelf life, but also provides a refreshing note and thirst quenching effect.
d) no development of off-flavour during storage.
e) possible to blend with other juices or flavours and to prepare red beet cordial.
f) possible to recover betanin pigments from the MF retentate as by-product.










We claim:
1. A process for preparation of ready-to-drink carbonated beverage from red
beet, comprising:
a) sorting and washing of fully matured red beets;
b) peeling and trimming and cutting of red beet into pieces of 5-6 cm;
c) blanching of cut red beet pieces in presence of steam for about 8-12 minutes;
d) crushing & macerating of steamed red beet to obtain pulp;
e) adjusting the pulp pH to 4.1-4.4 with addition of citric acid;
f) treating the pulp with 0.08%-0.12% pectic enzyme concentrate is carried out at 43°-48°
C forl.30h-2.30h;
g) extraction of the juice is carried out in an hydraulic press;
h) formulating the red beet beverage with the addition of 13%-16% juice, 12%-15% sugar, 0.22%-0.25% citric acid, 0.8-1.5 ppm ginger oil and, 0.006%-0.008% sodium benzoate; i) clarifying the above red beet beverage in a microfiltration unit using ceramic membrane
having 0.2-0.3 Dm pore size at 1.5-2.5 bar pressure and 25°-32° C temperature.
j) cooling the clear red beet beverage tol4°-16° C;
k) carbonating the fruit drink with 2-3 volumes of C02 gas;
2. A process as claimed in claim 1, wherein, the formulated red beet beverage is
characterized with 13%-16% juice, 13°-16° brix, 0.22%-0.25% acidity and 0.006%-0.008%
sodium benzoate.
3. A process for preparation of ready-to-drink carbonated beverage from red beet substantially as herein described with reference to the examples accompanying this specification.

Documents:

459-del-2004-abstract.pdf

459-DEL-2004-Claims-(20-10-2010).pdf

459-del-2004-claims.pdf

459-DEL-2004-Correspondence-Others-(20-10-2010).pdf

459-del-2004-correspondence-others.pdf

459-del-2004-correspondence-po.pdf

459-del-2004-description (complete).pdf

459-del-2004-form-1.pdf

459-del-2004-form-18.pdf

459-del-2004-form-2.pdf

459-del-2004-form-3.pdf

459-del-2004-form-5.pdf


Patent Number 244380
Indian Patent Application Number 459/DEL/2004
PG Journal Number 50/2010
Publication Date 10-Dec-2010
Grant Date 06-Dec-2010
Date of Filing 16-Mar-2004
Name of Patentee COUNCIL OF SCIENTIFIC AND INDUSTRIAL RESEARCH
Applicant Address RAFI MARG, NEW DELHI-110001, INDIA.
Inventors:
# Inventor's Name Inventor's Address
1 NGASEPPAM IBOYAIMA SINGH CENTRAL FOOD TECHONLOGICAL RESEARCH INSTITUTE, MYSORE-570013, INDIA.
2 VENKOBARAO MURALI MADHAV CENTRAL FOOD TECHONLOGICAL RESEARCH INSTITUTE, MYSORE-570013, INDIA.
3 KRIPANAND SATHIYA MALA CENTRAL FOOD TECHONLOGICAL RESEARCH INSTITUTE, MYSORE-570013, INDIA.
PCT International Classification Number A23L 2/02
PCT International Application Number N/A
PCT International Filing date
PCT Conventions:
# PCT Application Number Date of Convention Priority Country
1 NA