Title of Invention

RECOVERED HIGH STRENGTH MULTI-LAYER ALUMINUM BRAZING SHEET PRODUCTS

Abstract A metallurgical product consists essentially of a core aluminum alloy, purposefully tailored through chemistry and processing route to resist recrystallization during the brazing cycle to intentionally exploit the higher strengths immediately after brazing of a deformed and recovered microstructure, the core aluminum alloy being bonded on one side to an aluminum alloy inter-liner designed to be resistant to localized erosion, which, in turn, is bonded to a 4xxx cladding alloy.
Full Text

Recovered High Strength Multi-Layer Aluminum Brazing Sheet Products
Cross reference to related application [001] The present invention claims priority from the provisional patent application entitled; Recovered High Strength Multi-Layer Aluminum Brazing Sheet Products, Serial No. 60/618,637, which was filed on October 13, 2004. Further, the teachings of that application are fully incorporated into the present application by reference thereto.
Field of the Invention [002] This invention relates to the field of heat treatable and non-heat treatable aluminum alloy products. In particular, this invention relates to multi-laj'er brazing sheet products and processes for manufacturing these brazing sheet products. More particularly, the present invention is directed to a brazing sheet product useful for high-strength applications such as heat exchangers.
Background of the Invention [003] There is an increasing need for the reduction of weight and the reduction in cost for products made from aluminum brazing sheet particularly for brazing sheet used in heat exchangers, particularly in automotive applications. Brazing sheet products that exhibit higher-post braze yield strengths are desirable, as these high-strength products allow automotive engineers to downgauge. in short, a high strength brazing sheet product would allow the heat exchanger to be made from a thinner and, therefore, lighter brazing sheet, with corresponding weight savings in the overall automotive design.

[004] Iii addition, it is equally important that the brazing sheet or plate product have adequate corrosion resistance as well as adequate brazeability to allow the heat exchanger manufacturer to reliably braze the heat exchanger.
[005] Ideally, variants of the products also must be brazeable by a variety of brazing methods, most notably, vacuum and flux-based (e.g.. CAB or Nocolok™) brazing processes, to have as wide an application as possible.
[006] Although products which exhibit a recovered, but not recrystallized, microstructure are highly desirable from a post-braze yield strength perspective, it is well known that these microstructures are highly susceptible to localized erosion during the brazing cycle. Non-homogenized 3xxx cores, in O-temper, are known to be sensitive to core erosion during brazing. Core erosion is localized melting of the core alloy in contact with the molten 4xxx cladding and generally is deleterious to corrosion resistance and cladding flow (i.e., brazeability). Localized erosion typical])' results from enhanced Si diffusion from the 4xxx cladding alloy into the underlying base metal hi contact with the 4xxx cladding alloy. The dislocation networks (e.g., sub-grain boundaries) present in recovered, but unrecrystallized, microstructures result in demonstrably higher diffusivities for Si. The enhanced mobility of Si in the presence of a fine network of interlacing dislocations results in high local Si concentrations, which, in turn, result in localized melting of the metal in contact with the 4xxx cladding alloys dining the brazing cycle. This localized melting of the core alloy enriches the cladding wdth aluminum, and changes in-situ the cladding alloy's composition and its flow properties. Localized melting can also alter the surface topography of the metal, which generally retards 4xxx cladding flow diuing the brazing cycle and results in poor brazeability. Lastly, this localized ingress of Si into the core can result in an increased susceptibility to localized corrosion.

Summary of the Invention [007] The present invention relates to a selection of core and cladding alloys, cladding thicknesses, and processing routes that, when combined, produce fomrable, corrosion-resistant aluminum brazing sheet alloy products which exhibit goodbrazeability, including good cladding flow, with surprisingly low incidence of localized erosion, and which display surprisingly high post-braze tensile strengths immediately after brazing. The invention additionally includes Mg-containing and Mg-free (i.e., less than 0.05 wt-%) variants of brazing sheet products, with differing arrangements and thicknesses of tire layers (e.g., a core alloy layer, inter-liner layer, and a cladding layer, such as an Aluminum Association 4343 alloy cladding layer).
[008] The invention is a metallurgical product consisting of, or consisting essentially of, a core aluminum alloy, purposefully tailored through chemistry and processing route to resist recrystallization during the brazing cycle to intentionally exploit the higher strengths immediately after brazing of a deformed and recovered microstructure, the core aUoy being bonded on one side to an aluminum alloy interliner designed to be resistant to localized erosion, which, hi ton. is bonded to a 4xxx cladding alloy.
[009] In one embodiment of tire invention, the brazing sheets incorporate a non-honaogenized core. Tire core alloy has a recovered, in contrast to a substantially or wholly recrystallized, rnicrostnictoe. In another embodiment of the invention, both the core alloy and at least one of the outerliner layers have a recovered, non-homogenized microstructure.
[0010] A critical aspect of the invention is the presence of a high volume-fraction of fine particles that resist recrystallization in these alloys designed to exploit the higher strengths of a recovered microstructure. In dispersion-strengthened alloys (e.g., 3xxx alloys), it is generally desirable to avoid a homogenization practice to keep the volume-fraction of fine particles as high

as possible. Careful selection (or purposeful avoidance) of the thermal practices is a critical
element in establishing the dispersoid volume fraction and distribution., so, too, is the selection of
alloying levels and alloying elements. For example, specific alloying elements such as Zr will
also retard recrystallization. A partially or fully recovered microstructure will be significantly
stronger, pailicularly in terms of tensile yield strength, than a fully-recrystallized (annealed)
microstructure.
[0011] In one aspect of the invention, the core alloy and the 4xxx alloy cladding are separated by an interliner, such that the core is bonded to an interliner that is resistant to recrystallization, and the interliner is, in tan, bonded to the 4xxx alloy. This structure minimizes localized erosion, promotes good brazeability, and, by suitable selection of the interliner alloy, enhances corrosion resistance, such that the interliner alloy sacrificially protects the underlying core alloy.
[0012] A further aspect of the invention is that the core alloy and/or outerliner alloy is highly resistant to recrystallization, even in a highly strained, deformed state, during the brazing cycle. This deformation can be introduced naturally dining the stamping, drawing, and/or forming operations used to make the parts or can be purposefully introduced into the sheet by the aluminum sheet manufacturer.
Brief Description of the Drawings [0013] Fig. 1 is a schematic diagram showing Hie disthict layers of the several variants of multi-layer brazing sheets. It may be appreciated that, for clad composites exhibiting more than one interlayer, the composition and/or cladding ratio of the second interlayer may differ from that of the first interlayer. Further, it maybe appreciated that the cladding layer described as the

outerliner may consist of a brazing cladding or may consist of a waterside cladding or other aluminum cladding alloy.
[0014] Fig. 2 is a table (Table 1) showing the compositions (wt-%) of the core, brazing cladding, and interliner alloys used for the laboratory-fabricated brazing sheet products produced according to the invention.
[0015] Fig.3 is a table (Table 2) showing the pre-braze and post-braze mechanical properties of the laboratory-fabricated brazing sheet products produced according to the invention and summarized in Table 1.
[0016] Fig. 4 is a table (Table 3) showing the compositions (wt-%) of the plant-produced brazing sheets produced according to the invention.
[0017] Fig. 5 is a table (Table 4) showing the pre-braze and post-braze mechanical properties data for the plant-produced brazing sheets produced according to the invention and summarized in Table 3.
Detailed Description of Preferred Embodiments [0018] All elemental concentrations in the alloys herein are by weight percent unless otherwise indicated. As used herein, the term "substantially free" means that no purposeful addition of that alloying element was made to the composition, but that, due to impurities and/or leaching from contact with manufacturing equipment, trace quantities of such elements may, nevertheless, find then way into the final alloy product. In addition, when referring to any numerical range of values, such ranges are understood to include each and every number and/or fraction between the stated range minimum and maximum. A range of about 5 to 15 wt-% silicon, for example, would expressly include all intermediate values of about 5.1, 5.2, 5.3 and

5.5 wt-%, all the way up to and including 14.5, 14.7 and 14.9 wt-% Si. The same applies to each other numerical property, relative thickness, and/or elemental range set forth herein
[0019] The metallurgical approach to the core alloy is as follows. It has been found that one of the keys to the development of a rnicrostrncture that is highly resistant to recrystallization dining the brazing cycle of brazing sheet manufacturing is the presence of a significant volume-fraction of. fine particles, e,g.5 dispersoids. The Zener drag pressure exerted by a dispersoid population on a boundary is inversely proportional to the mean diameter of the particles and/or dispersoids and is directly proportional to then volume-fraction. As a result, it is believed that, for any given deformation state, there exists a critical particle diameter above which the particle can serve as a potential nucleation site for recrystallization. In most commercial dispersion-strengthened alloys, there is a population of particles and/or dispersoids above and below this critical mean diameter. Those particles above the critical diameter serve as potential nucleation sites for recrystallization and those below retard grain growth and inhibit recrystallization. Hence, if the goal is to inhibit recrystallization, the ideal microstructure is one which exhibits a high volume-fraction of fine sub-critical particles with high Zener drag, but which contains a minimal number of particles above the critical diameter for the alloy hi the deformation state of interest. Ideally, these dispersoids should be stable (i.e., insoluble or minimally soluble) in the core alloy during the brazing cycle employed to braze the part. Elements such as Zr, V. Cr and Ti promote the formation of small dispersoids and inhibit recrystallization to varying degrees, and, as such, are generally desirable at low concentrations in the core alloys of the invention. Particles of AlvMnwSixFeyNiz, if present, also can inhibit recrystallization, particularly if a significant volume-fraction of them are small, e.g., less than about 1 micron diameter. It should be expressly noted that the Mn. Si, Fe and Ni concentrations in the Alv Mnw Six Fey Niz particles

can vary over a wide range of stoichiometrics or can be fully absent from the particles, depending on the alloying levels present in the alloy.
[0020] Si concentrations above approximately 0.1 wt-% generally result in increasing volume-fractions of Alv Mnw Six Fey Nizparticles which are highly resistant to reversion during the brazing cycles. It is generally preferable to eliminate, or at least minimize, exposure of the core alloy to high temperature thermal treatments (e.g., homogenization, extended exposure to reheat for hot roiling, etc.) during the production of die brazing sheet to keep the highest possible volume-fraction of small dispersoids. Likewise, high solidification rates during casting are desirable because they allow for the introduction of higher volume-fractions of fine dispersoids into the alloy. As such, thin ingots are more desirable than thicker ingots for Direct-Chill casting of core alloys. Continuous casting (e.g.. slab casting, twin roll casting, drag casting, etc.) is further preferred, because of the even higher solidification rates attained during continuous casting.
[0021] The compositions and processing routes for the core alloys ideally should be selected to generate a high volume-fraction of fine (0.8 wt-%) and with Si concentrations above 0.5 wt-%. Additions of known recrystallization inhibitors like Zr are also desirable.
[0022] This same metallurgical approach can be used for selecting the outerliner alloys in the variants of the invention incorporating an outerliner. An outerliner wonld be employed if the design of the heat exchanger was snch that the one face of the sheet required an alloy whose material characteristics were specifically tailored to its working environment. For example.

since the working environment for an evaporator beat exchanger usually is damp and prone to promote corrosion, the outerliner for an evaporator heat exchanger component preferably would consist of an alloy with a high resistance to corrosion.
[0023] The core aluminum alloy composition must fall within a range of compositions such that the net concentration of the solute participating in the formation of dispersoids is higher than the net concentration of the solute that does not generally form dispersoids. Preferably, this results in the following relationship holding true:

[0024] Furthermore, it is preferred that the (Mn+Fe)-to-Si ratio in the core alloy be greater than or equal to about 1.5. Note, all alloy concentration values are expressed in wt-%.
[0025] It should be noted expressly that some of the above alloying elements can be at low. impurity levels, at undetectable levels, or altogether absent, as long as the relationship described above in equation 1 holds hire and as long as a significant population of particles are fine particles. Given cost and general scrap loop considerations, alloying elements like Ni, Cr, and V are typically disfavored, but are perfectly suitable for use in this invention. The thickness of the core alloy at final clad composite gauge can be as little as about 100 microns to as much as about 9mm.
[0026] The 4xxx cladding alloys should contain between about 4 and about 17 wt-% Si, between about 0.01 and about 1 wt-% Fe, up to about 2 wt-% Mg, up to about 2 wt-% Zn, up to about 0.5 wt-% Cu and up to about 0.5 wt-% Mn, up to about 0.2 wt-% In, with the balance of incidental elements and impurities being each at 0.05 wt-% or less, and not more than 0.25 wt-%, combined. The actual compositions will depend on the brazing application and electrochemical

potential desired in the cladding alloy. Particularly suitable 4xxx cladding alloys will contain between 6 and 13 wt-% Si, less than 0.5 wt-% Fe, less than 0.15 wt-% Mix, and less than 0.3 wt-% Cu, with the Mg concentrations dependent upon and tailored to the brazing method being employed (vacuum or flux-brazed), and the Zn and/or In concentration tailored to effect a desired- electrochemical potential within and adjacent to the brazing joint. It should also be noted that, in products requiring that both outer surfaces be clad with 4xxx alloys, the most typical application would have similar 4xxx alloys; however, the selection of the 4xxx cladding alloy is dependent on the brazing method employed and the design of the final part being brazed. The thickness of the 4xxx cladding alloys can range from as little as about 15 microns to as about 250 microns at the final gauge of the clad product.
[0027] The outerliner alloy as depicted in Fig. 1, (e.g., in variant 3) would generally be an alloy tailored to provide high corrosion resistance in the environment to which that face of the sheet is exposed and/or an alloy with elevated Mg concentration (relative to the core alloy) to provide even higher strength, if the application, part design, and brazing process allowed. One typical consideration in the claimed compositions is that the composition of the outerliner alloy be such that the Mg and/or Zn concentration be greater than that of the core alloy chosen for the specific application. This alloy should also have a solidus value in excess of 550°C, preferably above 580CC. At final brazing sheet gauge, the outerliner should be at least about 15 microns thick, preferably between about 15 and about 350 microns in thickness.
[0028] For many applications, it may be desirable for the aluminum producer to provide the brazing sheet product in a non-fally-annealed temper to obtain the fiill benefit of strengthening in the post brazed part The summation of strain imparted into the material at both the aluminum brazing sheet producer and the part fabricator must be less than the critical amount

of strain needed for complete recrystallization in the core alloy of the invention after brazing to receive some benefit from the strengthening associated with a recovered microstructure. As such, various tempers may be purposefully developed for brazing sheet material destined for specific parts to be fabricated from the brazing sheet to maximize post-braze yield strength within said part.
[0029] Fig. 1 depicts various possible combinations of core, claddings, and inter liners. As depicted, the brazing sheet product may be comprised of three, four, or five distinct layers. One of the outer layers for the thxee-layer products would be a 4xxx alloy cladding. The four-and five-layer products would have at least one 4xxx alloy outer layer, but perhaps two, 4xxx alloy outer layers. The interliner, resistant to recrystallization, is bonded between the'core and the 4xxx alloy cladding and/or between the core and the outerliner.
[0030] The ability to achieve high post-braze strength relies on the use of a non-homogenized, high-Si (>0.2 wt-%) 3xxx alloy core, separated from the 4xxx alloy braze cladding(s) by an interliner. Again, because non-homogenized 3xxx alloy cores (that recover) are sensitive to core erosion (localized melting of the core alloy in contact with the molten 4xxx cladding) during brazing, 3xxx core alloys typically are homogenized for products requiring significant formability (generally those products requiring O-temper). Homogenization (a high temperature [>450C] thermal treatment for more than about 3 hrs) generally improves formability. Core erosion generally is deleterious to corrosion resistance and cladding flow (i.e., brazeability). The use, under die patent, of an interliner protects the non-homogenized core alloy from coming into contact with the molten 4xxxx alloy cladding during the brazing process, hi this way, use of a recovered microstructure with a high volume-fraction of fine Alw Mux Siy Fez particles is possible. Furthermore, by selecting a high-Si 3xxx core alloy, the AlMnSiFe

particles do not revert during tire brazing process. As such, these fine particles are able to help inhibit recrystallization and promote a recovered, rather than recrystallized, microstructure. This recovered microstructure has significantly higher TYS and UTS values, while maintaining good formability. This approach has allowed for post-braze TYS values in excess of 85MPa and post-braze UTS values in excess of l60MPa, even in Mg-free alloys. The foregoing TYS compares favorably to a maximum TYS of about 68MPa for the same core alloy in the homogenized condition. If the brazing process and the part/joint geometry can tolerate higher Mg concentrations in the core alloy, higher post-braze properties are possible with Mg additions to the core alloy.
[0031] Figure 2 (Table i) is a table of the compositions of the alloys used in the various laboratory-fabricated composites evaluated in this stud}'.
[0032] Figure 3 (Table 2) is a table of pre-braze and post-braze mechanical properties for the laboratory-fabricated composites, as a function of applied pre-braze cold work.
[0033] Samples of later plant-produced variants consisting of a core, an interliner, and a cladding of 4045 alloy were tested in the as-produced condition and after having been plastically stretched 5%, 10% ; 15%, and 20%. As used herein, a sample stretched X% means that, after stretching, the sample is 100% + X% of the original length.
[0034] Figure 4 (Table 3) displays the alloy compositions and their functions in the plant-produced clad composites used in this study.
[0035] Figure 5 (Table 4) presents pre-braze and post-braze mechanical properties for the plant-produced materials used in this study.
[0036] It will be readily appreciated by those skilled in the art that modifications may be made to the invention without departing from the concepts disclosed in the foregoing description.

Such modifications are to be considered as included within the following claims unless the
i claims, by their language, expressly state otherwise. Accordingly, the particular embodiments
described in detail herein are illustrative only and are not limiting to the scope of the invention,
which is to be given the full breadth of the appended claims and any and all equivalents thereof.
[0037] Having described the presently preferred embodiments, it is to be understood that
the invention otherwise may be embodied within the scope, of the appended claims.


What is claimed is:
1. A metallurgical product consisting essentially of a core aluminum alloy,
purposefully tailored through chemistry and processing route to resist
recrystallization during the brazing cycle to intentionally exploit the higher
strengths immediately after brazing of a deformed and recovered
microstructure, bonded on one side to an aluminum alloy interliner designed to
be resistant to localized erosion, which, in turn, is bonded to a 4xxx cladding
alloy.
2. The metallurgical product of claim 1, wherein the core alloy has a high volume-fraction of Aly Mnw Six Fey Niz particles and/or Alx(Zr)y particles less than about 0.1 microns in average diameter.
3. The metallurgical product of claim 1, wherein the core alloy has between about 0.5 wt-% and about 1.7 wt-% Mn, between 0.1wt-% and about 1.2 wt-% Si, less than about 2 wt- % Fe, less than about 2.5 wt-% Mg, less than about 1.2 wt-% Cu? less than about 3 wt-% Zn, between 0 and about 0.3 wt-% Ti, and less than about 0.3 wt-% Zr with optional additions of less than 0.2 wt-% of Ni, V, Cr and Ag allowed but not preferred.
4. The metallurgical product of claim 1, wherein the solute (in weight percent) of the aluminum core alloy satisfies the following equation:


5. The metallurgical product of claim 1, wherein the core alloy has a (Mn+Fe)-to- Si ratio greater than about 1.4 and the core alloy is continuously cast.
6. The metallurgical product of claim 1, wherein the core alloy has purposeful additions of Zr to inhibit recrystallization and the core alloy is purposefully processed to limit exposure of the core alloy to elevated thermal practices beyond that which is required to attain appropriate temperature for hot rolling purposes.
7. The metallurgical product of claim 1, wherein the interliner is an aluminum alloy with Mg concentration below 0.5 wt-%, Fe concentration below about 0.8 wt-%, Cu concentration below about 0.5 wt-%, Mn concentration below about 1.7 wt-%, Cr concentration below about 0.3 wt-%, Zn concentration between 0 and about 1.5 wt-%, and Zr concentration below about 0.3 wt-%, which is processed to be resistant to localized erosion from the 4xxx cladding alloy during the brazing cycle.
8. The metallurgical product of claim 1, wherein the interliner alloy is sacrificial (i.e., more anodic), electrochemically, to the core alloy.
9. The metallurgical product of claim 1, wherein the interliner is an aluminum alloy with Mg concentration below about 0.07 wt-%, Fe concentration below about 0.4 wt-%, Cu concentration below about 0.3 wt-%, Mn concentration below about 0.3 wt-%, Cr concentration below about 0.1 wt-%, Zn concentration below about 1.5 wt-%, and Zr concentration below about 0.3 wt-%.
10. The metallurgical product of claim 1, wherein the interliner is at least 25
microns thick at final gauge and the interliner is a lxxx alloy.

11. The metallurgical product of claim 1, wherein the product is fabricated using a roll bonding process and the final gauge of the sheet is less than 9mm.
12. The metallurgical product of claim 1, wherein any or all of the alloys (4xxx cladding, interliner, or core alloy) are cast with average dendrite arm spacing of 400 microns or less.
13. A metallurgical product of claim 1, wherein the 4xxx braze cladding has Si concentration between about 6 and about 13 wt-%, Fe concentration of less than about 0.4 wt-%, Mn concentration below about 0.3 wt-%, Cu concentration between about 02. wt-% and about 0.3 wt-%, Zn concentration between about 0.1 wt-% and about 2 wt-%, and Mg concentration between about 0.05 wt-% and about 1.5 wt-%.
14. A metallurgical product of claim 1, wherein the opposing side of the core alloy is bonded to an outerliner alloy whose composition has a Mg and/or Zn concentration above that of the core alloy and a solidus temperature above about 550°C.
15. A metallurgical product of claim 1, wherein the opposing side of the core alloy is bonded to an outerliner alloy with a composition having Si between about 0.1 and 1.2 wt-%, Fe concentration below about 1 wt-%, Mg concentration between about 0.5 and about 2 wt-%, Zn concentration less than about 5 wt-%, Cu concentration below 0.5 wt-%, and Mn concentration less than 1.7 wt-%.
16. A metallurgical product of claim 1, wherein the opposing side of the core alloy is bonded to an outerliner alloy with a composition having Si between

about 0.05 and 1.2 wt-%, Mn concentration between about 1.2 wt-% and about 1.7 wt-%, Fe concentration below about 1 wt-%, Mg concentration between about 0.25 wt-% and 2.5 wt-%, Cu concentration between about 0.3 wt-% and about 0.7 wt-%, and Zn concentration between about 2.5 wt-% and about 4.0 wt-%, with Zr additions optional and less than 0.3 wt-%.
17. A metallurgical product of claim 13, wherein the product is age-hardenable after exposure to a brazing cycle.
18. A metallurgical product of claim 13, wherein the thickness of the outerliner is between about 25 microns and 5mm at final product gauge and the outerliner is electrochemically sacrificial to the core alloy.
19. A metallurgical product of claim 1, wherein the opposing side of the core alloy is bonded to a second interiiner alloy, which, in turn, is bonded to an outerliner alloy.
20. A metallurgical product of claim 18, wherein the second interiiner alloy is an aluminum alloy that is essentially identical in composition to the first interiiner.
21. A metallurgical product of claim 18, wherein the second liner is
purposefully different in composition and/or process than the first interiiner.
22. A metallurgical product of claim 18, wherein the second interiiner is an
aluminum alloy with Mg concentration below about 0.4 wt-%, Fe concentration
below about 0.4 wt-%, Cu concentration below about 0.3 wt-%, Mn
concentration below about 0.3 wt-%, Cr concentration below about 0.1 wt-%,

Zn concentration below about 1.5 wt-%, and Zr concentration below about 0.3 wt-%.
23. A metallurgical product of claim 1, wherein the opposing side of the core alloy is bonded to a second interliner alloy, which, in turn, is bonded to a second 4xxx braze cladding alloy.
24. A metallurgical product of claims 10 to 23, wherein the 4xxx braze cladding has Si concentration between about 5 and about 16 wt-%, Fe concentration of between about 0.5 wt-% and about 0.8 wt-%5 Mn concentration between about 0.4 wt-% and about 0.5 wt-%, Cu concentration between about 0.3 wt-% and about 0.5 wt-%, Zn concentration below about 2 wt-%, and Mg concentration between about 1.5 wt-% and about 3wt-%.

25. A metallurgical product of claim 23, wherein the second 4xxx braze cladding is essentially identical in composition to the first 4xxx alloy.
26. A metallurgical product of claim 23, wherein the second 4xxx braze cladding is purposefully different in composition to the first 4xxx alloy.

27. A metallurgical product of claim 24, wherein the 4xxx cladding is AA4343, AA4045, AA4047, AA4004, AA4104, AA4147 or some near compositional variant thereof.
28. The metallurgical product of claim 1, wherein the yield strength of the material immediately after brazing is equal to or greater than about 65 MPa.
29. The metallurgical product of claim 1, wherein the brazing sheet product is provided in a folly-annealed "O" temper.

30. The metallurgical product of claim 1, wherein the brazing sheet product is provided in an -O, H1X, Hill, H2X, or H3X temper.
31. The metallurgical product of claim 1, wherein the brazing sheet product is used to make a part of a heat exchanger, for example, a header, side support, manifold, end cap, etc.
32. The metallurgical product of claim 1, wherein one or more alloy layers of the product have an average dendrite arm spacing of 400 microns or less during the casting portion of the production process.
33. The product of claim 1, wherein the ratio of 4xxx braze cladding thickness to interliner thickness is no greater than about 3.5 to 1.
34. The product of claim 1, wherein at least one of the layers are cast in a separate operation and then roll bonded.
35. The product of claim 1, rolled to thicknesses between about 400 microns and about 9mm.
36. The metallurgical product of claim 1, wherein the 4xxx cladding(s) and interliner(s) have a Mg concentration below about 0.05 wt-%.
37. The brazing sheet of claim 1, wherein the post-braze tensile yield strength exceeds 60MPa when tested at room temperature immediately after brazing.
38. The brazing sheet of claim 1, wherein the sheet is used in a heat exchanger

and the sheet is formed into a shape, incorporated into a heat exchanger in some manner, and brazed.


Documents:

2060-CHENP-2007 AMENDED CLAIMS 18-08-2010.pdf

2060-CHENP-2007 AMENDED PAGES OF SPECIFICATION 18-08-2010.pdf

2060-CHENP-2007 CORRESPONDENCE OTHERS 14-05-2010.pdf

2060-CHENP-2007 EXAMINATION REPORT REPLY RECIEVED 18-08-2010.pdf

2060-chenp-2007 form-3 18-08-2010.pdf

2060-CHENP-2007 OTHER PATENT DOCUMENT 18-08-2010.pdf

2060-CHENP-2007 POWER OF ATTORNEY 18-08-2010.pdf

2060-CHENP-2007 FORM-13.pdf

2060-chenp-2007-abstract.pdf

2060-chenp-2007-claims.pdf

2060-chenp-2007-correspondnece-others.pdf

2060-chenp-2007-description(complete).pdf

2060-chenp-2007-drawings.pdf

2060-chenp-2007-form 1.pdf

2060-chenp-2007-form 26.pdf

2060-chenp-2007-form 3.pdf

2060-chenp-2007-form 5.pdf

2060-chenp-2007-form18.pdf

2060-chenp-2007-pct.pdf


Patent Number 244275
Indian Patent Application Number 2060/CHENP/2007
PG Journal Number 49/2010
Publication Date 03-Dec-2010
Grant Date 26-Nov-2010
Date of Filing 14-May-2007
Name of Patentee ALCOA INC
Applicant Address ALCOA CORPORATE CENTER, 201 ISABELLA STREET, PITTSBURGH, PA 15212-5858.
Inventors:
# Inventor's Name Inventor's Address
1 KILMER, RAYMOND, J 1845 NORFOLK STREET, BIRMINGHAM, MI 48009
PCT International Classification Number G03G 5/10
PCT International Application Number PCT/US2005/036758
PCT International Filing date 2005-10-13
PCT Conventions:
# PCT Application Number Date of Convention Priority Country
1 11/248,531 2005-10-12 U.S.A.
2 60,618,637 2004-10-13 U.S.A.