Title of Invention

A SYNERGISTIC SUGAR-FREE SYRUP COMPOSITION USEFUL FOR PREPARING TRADITIONAL INDIAN SWEETS

Abstract The present invention relates to a synergistic sugar-free syrup composition useful for preparing traditional Indian sweets, said syrup composition comprising 25.0 to 99.99 % by wt. sorbitol, 0.01 to 20.0 % by wt. mannitol, up to 70.0 % by wt. water and upto 0.5 gms of an intense sweetener per 500 gms of final syrup and a process for preparing the same.
Full Text FIELD OF THE INVENTION
The present invention relates to a synergistic sugar-free syrup composition useful for
preparing traditional Indian sweets, said syrup composition comprising 25.0 to 99.99 %
by et. sorbitol. 0.01 to 20.0 % by wt. mannitol, up to 70.0 % by wt. water and upto 0.5
gms of an intense sweetener per 500 gms of final syrup and a process for preparing the same.
DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION
Accordingly, the present invention provides a synergistic sugar-free syrup composition useful for preparing traditional Indian sweets, said syrup composition comprising 25.0 to 99.99 % by wt. sorbitol, 0.01 to 20.0 % by wt. mannitol, up to 70.0 % by wt. water and upto 0.5 gms of an intense sweetener per 500 gms of final syrup.
In an embodiment of the present invention, the intense sweetener is selected from the group comprising of sucralose, aspartame, acesulfame K and mixture thereof.
In another embodiment of the present invention, the traditional Indian sweets include jamun, rasagolla, sweet boondi and laddu.
The present invention also provides a process for preparing a synergistic sugar-free syrup composition useful for preparing traditional Indian sweets, said process comprising the steps of:
(a) mixing 25.0 to 99.9 % by wt. of sorbitol, 0,01 to 20.0 % by wt. mannitol and up to 70 % by wt. water to obtain a mixture, and
(b) adding upto 0.5 gms of an intense sweetener per 500 gms of the mixture of step (a) to obtain the synergistic sugar-free syrup composition.
In an embodiment of the present invention, the intense sweetener is selected from the group comprising of sucralose, aspartame, acesulfame K and mixture thereof.
In another embodiment of the present invention, the traditional Indian sweets include jamun, rasagolla, sweet boondi and laddu.
The novelty of the process is selection of alternative sweeteners to impart characteristics similar to those of sugar and also preparation of sweetener blend with equi-sweetness compared to sugar and the proper consistency and mixing operations of sweetener to get the products similar in quality compared to sugar counterpart. Small quantity of mannitol

was incorporated along with sorbitol to induce desirable crystallization especially for
laddu and Boondi, similar to sugar. The products do not contain any added sugar and are
similar in texture and mouthfeel compared to those of traditional sugar counterparts and
can be consumed by health conscious consumers.
Accordingly, a sugar free syrup formulation for Indian traditional sweets and a process
for preparation thereof, comprising:
Ingredient (A) Solid / Powder (g) (B) Syrup (g)
a. Sorbitol 150-425 400-500
b. Mannitol 0.5-110 0.5-100
c. Water 75- 350 0-1120
d. Intense sweetener 0-0.5 0 - 0.5
(g/500g of final syrup)
(Sucralose/ Aspartame/ Acesulfame K)
In an embodiment of the present invention, preparation of the syrup comprises:
Preparing the sugar free syrup by choosing either (A) or (B), adding the ingredients and
mixing thoroughly to obtain a syrup of the said strength by diluting or concentrating.
In yet another embodiment of the present invention, the syrup strengths may be
appropriately altered depending on the type of the product.
The details of the process are as follows:
The main steps involved in the present invention are: selection of appropriate sweeteners
and the concentration of the syrup to suit the particular product preparation. The
proportions of sweeteners and their strength differ depending on the type of the end
product. The details of the sweetener blend and the syrup preparation for different sweets
are given under.
Base stock syrup: Sorbitol (solid) made upto 67°Brix i.e., having 67% soluble solids as
measured by hand refractometer, by adding water or sorbitol syrup having 67°B was used
for preparation of various sugar free syrups suitable for different sweets, as described
under.
For Jamun: Sorbitol syrup consisting of about 67% soluble solids (67°B) was made up
to about 45-65°B by diluting with water. 0.05-0.25 g of sucralose was added to 500 ml of
this syrup and mixed to get the desired syrup having desired consistency and sweetness
similar to those of sugar, suitable for Jamun preparation. Also, the other intense
sweeteners used in place of sucralose are: aspartame, 0.1-0.3 g per 500 ml syrup;
acesulfame K, 0.3-0.5 g per 500 ml syrup. The concentration of intense sweeteners and
sorbitol syrup was calculated to get equi-sweetness level compared to sugar and desired
consistency suitable for Jamun.
Jamun is prepared by making dough from commercially available instant mix, frying in a
blend of refined peanut or sunflower oil and vanaspati at about 150°C and then soaking
the fried balls in the syrup prepared as mentioned above for 2-8 hr.
For Rasogolla: Sorbitol syrup of about 67°B was made up to about 40-50°B by diluting
with water. 0.1-0.3 g of sucralose was added to 500 ml of this syrup and mixed to get the
desired syrup for Rasogolla preparation as boiling syrup. Similarly the syrup for soaking
was prepared by mixing 0.1-0.3 g of sucralose in 500 ml sorbitol syrup and adjusting the
strength to about 35-45°B.
Rasogolla was prepared following the traditional method using dairy milk, separating
Channa by adding 200 ml of 1% citric acid to 500 ml milk at 70 °C; draining the whey
and making balls of channa by mixing with wheat semolina and baking soda. The
kneaded balls are then cooked in the above mentioned boiling syrup of 40-50°B sorbitol
and intense sweetener syrup for 10 min and then soaked in the same syrup of 35-45°B for
1 -2 hr to get ready to eat sugarless but sweet Rasogolla.
For sweet Boondi: Sorbitol syrup of 67°B was made up to about 62°B by diluting with
water. 0.5 g of sucralose was added to 500 ml of this syrup and mixed to get the desired
syrup having equi-sweetness compared to sugar for sweet Boondi preparation. The other
intense sweeteners used inplace of sucralose are "artame, acesulfame K.
Boondi was prepared by frying bengalgram batter in refined peanut or sunflower oil at
160°C to get boondi. The fried Boondi was soaked in this syrup at 75-90°C, removed and
allowed to surface dry to get sugarless sweet Boondi having texture and mouthfeel
similar to that of sugar counterpart.
For Laddu: The Sorbitol syrup of 67°B was mixed with solid mannitol in the proportion
of 80-95:5-20 on dry wt basis and 0.1-0.3 g of sucralose was added to 500 ml of the
above syrup and was concentrated to 70-80°B to have same consistency and sweetness
compared to sugar.
Boondi was prepared by frying bengalgram batter in refined peanut or sunflower oil at
160°C to get Boondi having moisture content of about 15-17%.
The fried boondi was mixed with the above syrup in the ratio of 10:13 w/w and the
mixture was warmed till the syrup strength reached to about 80-82°B, cooled to about 35-
40°C and were made into balls either manually or using a mechanical device to obtain
ready to eat Laddu without having added sugar.
The following examples are given by the way of illustration of the present invention and
therefore should not be constructed to limit the scope of the present invention.
Example 1
Preparation of the syrup: Take 500g of sorbitol syrup having 67°B (67% soluble solids
content) as measured by hand refractometer. To this syrup 40g of water is added and
mixed thoroughly to get a syrup of 62°B. 0.5 g of sucralose was added to 500 ml of this
sorbitol syrup and mixed to get the desired syrup for sweet Boondi preparation.
The fried Boondi was prepared by frying the batter consisting of bengalgram flour and
water in refined sunflower oil at 160°C for about 90 sec. The fried boondi (150 g) at
65°C was soaked in the above syrup at 75°C for 3 min, it was removed and allowed to
surface dry to obtain ready to eat sweet Boondi without any added sugar.
Example 2
Preparation of the syrup: 310g of solid sorbitol was taken and 190 ml water added to
make up 500 ml syrup having 62°B. 0.5 g of sucralose was added to 500 ml of this
sorbitol syrup and mixed to get the desired syrup for sweet Boondi preparation.
The fried Boondi was prepared by frying the batter consisting of bengalgram flour and
water in refined sunflower oil at 160°C for about 90 sec. The fried Boondi (150 g) at
75°C was soaked in the above syrup at 85°C for 3 min, it was removed and allowed to
surface dry to obtain ready to eat sweet Boondi without any added sugar.
Example 3
Preparation of the syrup: Take 500g of sorbitol syrup having 67°B (67% soluble solids
content) as measured by hand refractometer. To this syrup added 40g of water and mixed
thoroughly to get a syrup of 62°B. 1.4 g of aspartame was added to 500 ml of this sorbitol
syrup and mixed to get the desired syrup for sweet Boondi preparation.
The fried Boondi was prepared by frying the batter consisting of bengalgram flour and
water in refined sunflower oil at 160°C for about 90 sec. The fried Boondi (150 g) at
65°C was soaked in the above syrup at 75°C for 3 min, it was removed and allowed to
surface dry to obtain ready to eat sweet Boondi without any added sugar.
Example 4
Preparation of the syrup: Take 500g of sorbitol syrup having 67°B (67% soluble solids
content) as measured by hand refractometer. To this syrup added 40g of water and mixed
thoroughly to get a syrup of 62°B. 0.1 g of sucralose was added to 500 ml of this sorbitol
syrup and mixed to get the desired syrup for Jamun preparation.
Jamun was prepared using commercially available instant mix and frying in a blend of
refined groundnut oil and vanaspati at about 150°C. The fried Jamun balls are then
soaked in the above syrup at 60°C for 4 hr to get ready to eat sugarless sweet Jamun.
Example 5
Preparation of the syrup: Take 500g of sorbitol syrup having 67°B (67% soluble solids
content) as measured by hand refractometer. To this syrup added 40g of water and mixed
thoroughly to get a syrup of 62°B. 0.2 g of aspartame was added to 500 ml of this sorbitol
syrup and mixed to get the desired syrup for Jamun preparation.
Jamun was prepared using commercially available instant mix and frying in a blend of
refined groundnut oil and vanaspati at about 150°C. The fried Jamun balls are then
soaked in the above syrup at 60°C for 4 hr to get ready to eat sugarless sweet Jamun.
Example 6
Preparation of the syrup: Take 500g of sorbitol syrup having 67°B (67% soluble solids
content) as measured by hand refractometer. To this syrup added 245 g of water and
mixed thoroughly to get a syrup of 45°B. 0.1 g of sucralose was added to 500 ml of this
syrup and mixed to get the desired syrup for Rasogolla preparation as boiling syrup.
Similarly the same syrup for soaking was prepared by adjusting the 500ml of sorbitol
syrup to about 40°B by diluting with water.
Rasogolla was prepared following the traditional method using dairy milk, separating
Channa by adding 200 ml of 1% citric acid to 500 ml milk at 70 °C; draining the whey
and making balls of channa by mixing with wheat semolina and baking soda. The
kneaded balls are then cooked in the above sorbitol and intense sweetener syrup for 10
min and then soaked in the same syrup of 40°B for 1-2 hr to get ready to eat sugarless but
sweet Rasogolla.
Example 7
Preparation of the syrup: Take 500g of sorbitol syrup having 67°B (67% soluble solids
content) as measured by hand refractometer. To this syrup added 245g of water and
mixed thoroughly to get a syrup of 45°B. 0.2 g of sucralose was added to 500 ml of this
syrup and mixed to get the desired syrup for Rasogolla preparation as boiling syrup.
Similarly the same syrup for soaking was prepared by adjusting the 500ml of sorbitol
syrup to about 40°B by diluting with water.
Rasogolla was prepared following the traditional method using dairy milk, separating
Channa by adding 200 ml of 1% citric acid to 500 ml milk at 70 °C; draining the whey
and making balls of channa by mixing with wheat semolina and baking soda. The
The sorbitol syrup of 67°B (67% soluble solids) was mixed with solid mannitol in the
proportion of 90:10 on dry wt basis and made up to 500 ml with water. This syrup was
taken and 1.4g of aspartame was added and concentrated to 75°B i.e., 75% soluble solids
as measured by hand refractometer by heating.
Boondi was prepared by frying bengalgram batter in refined groundnut oil at 160°C to
get Boondi having moisture content of about 15-17%.
The fried Boondi was mixed with the above syrup in the ratio of 10:13 w/w and the
mixture was warmed, cooled to about 35-40°C and were made into balls either manually
or using a mechanical device to obtain ready to eat Laddu without having added sugar.
Analyses:
All the products prepared were subjected to sensory analysis and compared with those of
sugar. Important attributes of each product were analysed by a panel of 12 judges and the
mean sensory scores on a 10 point headonic scale were reported. The results in Table 1,
revealed that all the sugar free products were comparable with the corresponding sugar
counterparts in all the sensory attributes. Even the shelf life of these products is similar to
those of sugar containing products.
The main advantages of the present invention are:
1. The products are ready-to-eat sweet similar to traditional sweet, having no added
sugar.
kneaded balls are then cooked in the above sorbitol and intense sweetener syrup for 10
min and then soaked in the same syrup of 40°B for 1-2 hr to get ready to eat sugarless but
sweet Rasogolla.
Example 8
The sorbitol syrup of 67°B (67% soluble solids) was mixed with solid mannitol in the
proportion of 90:10 on dry wt basis and made up to 500 ml with water. This syrup was
taken and 0.1 g of sucralose was added and concentrated to 75°B i.e., 75% soluble solids
as measured by hand refractometer by heating.
3oondi was prepared by frying bengalgram batter in refined groundnut oil at 160°C to
get Boondi having moisture content of about 15-17%.
The fried Boondi was mixed with the above syrup in the ratio of 10:13 w/w and the
mixture was warmed, cooled to about 35-40°C and were made into balls either manually
or using a mechanical device to obtain ready to eat Laddu without having added sugar.
Example 9
The sorbitol syrup of 67°B (67% soluble solids) was mixed with solid mannitol in the
proportion of 85:15 on dry wt basis and made up to 500 ml with water. This syrup was
taken and 0.1 g of sucralose was added and concentrated to 75°B i.e., 75% soluble solids
as measured by hand refractometer by heating.
Boondi was prepared by frying bengalgram batter in refined groundnut oil at 160°C to
get Boondi having moisture content of about 15-17%.
The fried Boondi was mixed with the above syrup in the ratio of 10:13 w/w and the
mixture was warmed, cooled to about 35-40°C and were made into balls either manually
or using a mechanical device to obtain ready to eat Laddu without having added sugar.
Example 10
2. The products are similar to traditional sweet in texture and overall sensory quality
and do not contain any added sugar, so that they can be onsumed by health
conscious consumers as well.






We Claim:
1. A synergistic sugar-free syrup composition useful for preparing traditional Indian sweets, said syrup composition comprising 25.0 to 99.99 % by wt. sorbitol, 0.01 to 20.0 % by wt. mannitol, up to 70.0 % by wt. water and upto 0.5 gms of an intense sweetener per 500 gms of final syrup.
2. A sugar-free syrup composition as claimed in claim 1, wherein the intense sweetener is selected from the group comprising of sucralose, aspartame, acesulfame K and mixture thereof.
3. A process for preparing a synergistic sugar-free syrup composition useful for preparing traditional Indian sweets, said process comprising the steps of:

(a) mixing 25.0 to 99.9 % by wt. of sorbitol, 0.01 to 20.0 % by wt. mannitol and up to 70 % by wt. water to obtain a mixture, and
(b) adding upto 0.5 gms of an intense sweetener per 500 gms of the mixture of step (a) to obtain the synergistic sugar-free syrup composition.
4. A synergistic sugar-free syrup composition useful for preparing traditional Indian
sweets substantially as herein described with reference to the examples
accompanying the specification.

Documents:

399-DEL-2003-Abstract-(02-09-2009).pdf

399-del-2003-abstract.pdf

399-DEL-2003-Claims-(02-09-2009).pdf

399-del-2003-claims.pdf

399-DEL-2003-Correspondence-Others-(02-09-2009).pdf

399-del-2003-correspondence-po.pdf

399-DEL-2003-Description (Complete)-(02-09-2009).pdf

399-del-2003-description (complete).pdf

399-DEL-2003-Form-1-(02-09-2009).pdf

399-del-2003-form-1.pdf

399-del-2003-form-18.pdf

399-DEL-2003-Form-2-(02-09-2009).pdf

399-del-2003-form-2.pdf

399-DEL-2003-Form-3-(02-09-2009).pdf

399-del-2003-form-3.pdf

399-DEL-2003-Petition-137-(02-09-2009).pdf

399-DEL-2003-Petition-137-(08-09-2009).pdf


Patent Number 243385
Indian Patent Application Number 399/DEL/2003
PG Journal Number 43/2010
Publication Date 22-Oct-2010
Grant Date 11-Oct-2010
Date of Filing 26-Mar-2003
Name of Patentee COUNCIL OF SCIENTIFIC AND INDUSTRIAL RESEARCH
Applicant Address RAFI MARG,NEW DELHI-110 001,INDIA.
Inventors:
# Inventor's Name Inventor's Address
1 CHETANA RAMAKRISHNA CENTRAL FOOD TECHNOLOGICAL RESEARCH INSTITUTE,MYSORE-570 013,INDIA.
2 YELLA REDDY SUNKI REDDY CENTRAL FOOD TECHNOLOGICAL RESEARCH INSTITUTE MYSORE-570 013,INDIA.
PCT International Classification Number A23L 1/22
PCT International Application Number N/A
PCT International Filing date
PCT Conventions:
# PCT Application Number Date of Convention Priority Country
1 NA