Title of Invention

"A SOY BASED SOUP FORMULATION FOR IMPROVED SOUP MIX CONTAINING DEFATTED SOY FLOUR AND A PROCESS THEREOF"

Abstract The present invention relates to a soy based soup formulation for improved soup mix containing thermally processed defatted soy flour. The processed (toasted) wheat semolina, starch, pre gelatinized corn starch spice mix flavor base, flavor enhancer, dehydrated vegetable mix, and blending with minor ingredients (powdered sugar, skim milk powder and tartrazine yellow), which is suspended in twelve parts of water and boiled to get a soup of desirable consistency with no beany aroma, bitter or bitter after taste and improved sensory quality attributes.
Full Text The present invention relates to a soy based soup formulation for improved soup mix containing thermally processed defatted soy flour and a process thereof.
Background of the invention
Soups of several kinds are consumed world over and there is a marked rise in the consumption of soy beans in the recent past. Various soy bean processing techniques have been reported (1). Preparation of soups using fermented soy bean such as miso soups (2), and the effects of solid particle size distribution and level in soybean miso on sensory quality of miso soup were examined. Particles less than 170 mesh sieve size had most influence on soup attributes. Preparation methods of soybeans affected particle size distribution, e.g. the less than 170 sieve size particle concentration was increased by chopping of beans and total particle concentration was significantly decreased by fermentation (3). New types and uses of miso (seasoned miso, low-salt miso, instant miso soup), and composition (4), physicochemical properties and toxicological attributes have been reported.
To establish the functionality of different soy products in cream soup, full-fat and defatted flours and grits with different protein dispersibility indices (PDI) and soy concentrates were evaluated in one base formula. With these products a constant level of protein (20%) and fat (20%) was obtained in all formulations, soy protein being 70% of total protein in the final formula. Consistency vs. temp, curves showed higher values for flours (less than 100 Mesh) than for grits (50-100 Mesh). Full-flat flours and grits showed higher consistency than the corresponding defatted products. However, sensory evaluation of soups made with all the untoasted flours and grits showed "good" acceptability. On the other hand, toasted flours and grits (PDI 15) lacked emulsifying capacity. The use of toasted flour, justified by its greater availability in the market, was made possible by adding guar gum. The functional characteristics and sensory evaluation of this toasted flour based soup were "good", comparable to those obtained with the untoasted products. Rheological characteristics were studied (5).
The effects of NaCI on microbial load, pH, and titratable acidity during the fermentation of soybean and on the organoleptic qualities of soy-daddawa (fermented soybean used as a soup condiment in Nigeria) were investigated. Microbial growth, pH, and titratable acidity decreased with increasing NaCI concn. (0-5% w/w measured). 1% w/w NaCI in the fermenting mash improved the organoleptic quality of soy-daddawa. It is suggested that 1% w/w NaCI could improve soybean fermentation for soy-daddawa (6).
Use of dried or paste-like protein hydrolysates (not defined), or of a broth paste made from them, or of a protein supplement containing 50% deodorized full fat soya flour is recommended in preparation of dried soup and main dish concentrates. Each recipe includes 9.5-15% protein hydrolysate. Organoleptic evaluation of packaged dried concentrates alone or with the above supplements during storage under ambient conditions for less than13 months showed very little loss of value for less than12 months (7), the supplemented concentrates being graded higher than the unsupplemented ones.
Miso is a fermented soybean paste widely used in Japan as a soup base or seasoning The suitability of using peas {Pisum sativum) and beans {Phaseolus vulgaris) of German origin as substitutes for soybeans in the preparation of miso-like products was studied. None had a legume-like taste and all were regarded as acceptable (8).
In sensory tests, miso made with potato or pumpkin koji was judged inferior in colour and texture to standard koji, but it had a good taste; light miso from kidney beans also had a poor colour but a good taste. Soup made from potato or pumpkin miso tasted different from that from normal miso, but received similar or higher scores (9).
Different recipes for dried lentil soup were prepared from various blends of dried dehulled cracked lentil seeds, dried soybean seeds, dried chick-pea seeds, fresh can-ots, fresh tomatoes, and fresh onions. Ingredients were cooked under pressure, then strained and dried in an open oven at SCC. The dried blends were milled and sieved to reach a 95% extraction ratio. Resultant powders were mixed
with other dry ingredients (0.5% dried yeast, 5% dried skim milk or 5% dried whole egg). Addition of soybeans and chick-pea increased nutritional values of the blends without impairing organoleptic properties. Protein was increased quantitatively and adapted qualitatively to meet FAO recommendations. The best blend was that which included lentil, soybean, chick-peas, carrot, tomato, onion and dried whole egg (10).
Use of low cost extrusion technology in Chihuahua, Mexico, to produce full fat soy flour (FFSF) is discussed. This is used to fortify tortilla masa which is an ingredient of many Mexican dishes. It has also been sold in flake form direct to the consumer for use in soup, etc. (11).
A new method of manufacturing a soybean film is described. Films made by the 2 mechanized methods and by hand were compared for use in chicken rolls, vegetarian ham, toupau, touchang (both deep-fried, shaped film products), fried soybean film, and instant soup; a spiced or flavoured soybean film could be made by adding spices to the cone, soymilk prior to drying. The new films were of good quality and suitable for use in Taiwanese recipes (12).
Studies were conducted on methods for preparation of a 'composite flour" from 70% corn grits and 30% soy milk extraction residue (60% of the protein being derived from the soy milk residue, 40% from the corn grits). 3 processes were studied for production of this flour: (i) mixing to a slurry and drum-drying at 130°, 143 "C or 156°C; (ii) drum-drying of the ingredients separately, grinding and mixing in the dry state; and (iii) extrusion processing of the corn grits, drum drying of the soy milk residue and mixing in the dry state. The results are discussed in detail. All 3 techniques were found to give products with good organoleptic properties and PER 90% that of casein. Drum-drying temperature had little effect on the PER of the finished product. Acceptability of polenta or cream soup made with the composite flour was good, whereas acceptability of a porridge-type product made with this flour was poor (13).
HTST extrusion cooking of cereals and oilseed proteins is surveyed, with particular reference to processes developed by Wenger International Inc. Future
developments are possible in reduction of the flatus problem with soy flours and improvements in flavour of soybean products (14).
A pre-cooked soup mixture was prepared from defatted soybean and corn meals. The results indicated that a mixture containing a max. of 50% soybean meal yielded a product with good acceptability. Comparison between the soybean-corn meal mixture (30, 40 and 50% soybean meal) and a commercial product (Corn Soy-Milk) indicated that the fomner has a higher protein content (15).
A study was undertaken to evaluate nutritional characteristics of dry-mix soups formulated with heated or unheated soybean flours or with soy concentrate. Formulation of dry-mix soups contained approx. 20% protein, soy protein being 65% of the total protein. Biological evaluation of soup protein was carried out on made-up soups subjected to different boiling times (5-15 min) by usual cooking methods, in order to inactivate trypsin inhibitor. With 10 min cooking the destruction of trypsin inhibitor in soups reached 81%. These figures prove the feasibility of formulating soups with as good nutritional characteristics for untoasted as for toasted soy products. Moreover, these soy based formulations would improve the nutritional contribution of soups, which are a habitual component of diets (16).
Some food combinations for the pre-school child have been described. Family-size and quantity-size recipes utilizing corn-soy blend with rolled oats together with locally produced foods were formulated and submitted for sensory evaluation. The improved soup recipes were acceptable while the flavour of the desserts were the most liked. Most of the desserts have contributed more to the calorie density of the food combination and some puddings have even higher protein content than some soups. The substantial protein and energy rich soups for the mid-morning snacks paired with the high energy-protein desserts would make this the right food combination to help fight energy-protein malnutrition (17). Flours from full-fat and defatted soybeans were made in the laboratory and used as supplements to Egyptian bread and 2 popular legume foods (lentil soup and falafil). Organoleptic properties of enriched lentil soup and falafil were similar to
those of control at levels of 25% and 50% full-fat soy and of 40% and 60% defatted soy flour, resp. The most favourable change of chemical composition of lentil soup and falafil was the increased protein content. Also, increasing the level of defatted soy flour increased ash content and decreased the level of fat absorption by fried falafil. However, increasing the level of full-fat soy may replace the addition of shortening to lentil soup to make it more palatable (18).
New dried soup additives for food concentrates containing 40% proteinacous hydrolysate or bouillon paste have been reported. The hydrolysate is a mixture of dried hydrolysate and deodorized soybean flour in a 1:3 ratio; the bouillon paste is a mixture of condensed hydrolysate with aromatized fat and salt. The other ingredients are dried vegetables, spices and/or tomato powder. The additive with the proteinacous hydrolysate contains 21.6% proteins, 14.2% fat, and 35.7% saccharides, the calorific value being 1541 kJ/100 g. The additive with the bouillon paste contains 11.0% proteins, 12.0% fat, and 38.9% saccharides, the calorific value being 1332 kJ/100 g. The additives are marketed in 75-100 g bags or 1500 g bags for canteens and restaurants, etc.; briquettes are available weighing 200-450 g. A detailed formula of the additives is presented (19).
Protein-fortified cereal products were made by direct extrusion of 2-component and 3-component blends of carbohydrate sources (yellow corn snack meal, whole ground yellow corn meal, farina, sorghum brewers' grits, ground whole high-lysine corn, whole wheat flour, ground dehulled Proso millet) and high-protein materials (defatted soy flakes, defatted soy flour, 90% protein soy isolate, 70% protein soy concentrate and 70% protein wheat gluten). Products were analysed for moisture, fat, protein, expansion, water absorption and water solubility. Only one product (90% yellow snack meal • 10% wheat gluten) had a larger expansion than the cereal standard (yellow corn snack meal). Addition of soy products decreased expansion by about 25% with soy flakes, less with isolate or concentrate. Fortification with wheat gluten improved expansion and up to 30% could be added to corn meal. Expansion of 3-component blends ranged from 2.3 to 2.8 times the die dia., owing to the presence of whole wheat flour. Bostwick consistency values showed that all products would be suitable as beverages at 10% levels. Texture of all blends resembled existing extruded products. Cereal
taste masked soy flavour at up to 40% soy flake addition. Potential uses include gruel and soup bases, beverages, snack foods or breakfast cereals (20). The nutritive value of Provesol, a high protein product obtained from powdered soybeans, is discussed. Undesirable soybean constituents (a trypsin inhibitor and urease) are destroyed during preparation. Methionine supplementation raised the protein efficiency ratio from 2.18-2.28 to 2.52 (casein 2.79). Lysine content is 5.54 g/100 g protein (whole milk powder 7.94). Food applications include supplementation of infant feeds, maize starch, plantain flour, fruit beverages, chocolate drink, cream soup and fermented rice beverages. Some recipes are appended (21).
Use of different flours in tarhana. (Kose- and Cagindi-, (2002) which is a traditional fermented soup with good nutritional properties popular in the Middle East has been reported.. It is generally made by mixing one part white wheat flour, wholemeal flour or semolina with half or one part yoghurt and other ingredients, such as bakers' yeast, tomato, onion, paprika, salt and spices, after which it is fermented for 1-7 days, air-dried and milled. In this study, the feasibility of using cereal flours other than wheat flour for production of tarhana was investigated. Tarhana samples were prepared using either wheat, rye or corn flour, or combinations of rye and wheat, corn and wheat or soybean and wheat flours. Of the soups prepared from these samples, that produced from 25% rye + 75% wheat flour was most preferred in terms of overall acceptability, soups made from wheat and corn flours had lower flavour, aroma, mouthfeel and overall acceptability scores. Although addition of soy meal decreased colour and mouthfeel scores, use of 15% soy meal + 85% wheat flour resulted in the highest flavour and aroma scores; in addition, the soup prepared from 5% soy meal + 95% wheat flour was equal to that prepared from 100% wheat flour in terms of overall acceptability. It is concluded that tarhana soups prepared from mixtures of rye and wheat flours or soy meal and wheat flour are acceptable, whereas those prepared from corn or corn and wheat mixtures are less acceptable (22).
Iwe- MO (2000) has reported about the effects of extrusion cooking parameters on water sorption, trypsin inhibitor concentration and physical properties of soy meal-sweet potato mixtures were studied. Mixtures of defatted
soy meal and sweet potatoes at ratios of 0:100, 25:75, 50:50, 75:25 and 100:0 were extruded In an Insta-Pro 600 single screw extruder operated at 180, 200 or 220 rpm. 3, 4 or 5% oil was added to the mix before extrusion. A 5 x 3 x 2 fractional factorial central composite response surface design was adopted for investigating effects of feed composition (soy-sweet potato ratio), oil concn. and screw rotation speed (rpm). Effects of extrusion cooking on bulk density, expansion ratio, water absorption and solubility indices, and trypsin Inhibitor concentration were assessed. Results showed that feed composition and screw speed had strong Influences on the process. Effect of adding oil to defatted soybean significantly (P s 0.05) affected trypsin Inhibitor content only. High extrusion temp. ( greater than 1300C) and accompanying high shear were due to the non-pasting nature of the extrudate. Therefore, it Is concluded that the extrusion products may have uses as ready-to-eat breakfast foods, bread flour mixes or soup bases (23).
Effects of extrusion cooking of mixtures of soybean and sweet potato were investigated with respect to the functional properties of the extrudates. Full-fat soybeans (var. Samsoy 2) and sweet potato were extruded In ratios of 0:100, 25:75, 50:50, 75:25 and 100:0 using a single screw extruder operated at 180, 200, 220 rpm, respectively. Bulk density, expansion ratio, water absorption and solubility indices and trypsin Inhibitor concn. were determined. Results showed that addition of soybean to sweet potato considerably increased the protein, fat, ash and trypsin inhibitor levels of the raw material mixtures. Decreases in the viscosity of raw mixtures with corresponding increases In pasting temp, were also observed. Addition of soybean significantly (P Defatted soy grits (Yellow II cv.), prepared by a 13-stage process developed by the Polish Institute for the Meat & Fats Industry, Gdansk (manufacturing stages shown in the form of a flow diagram), were analysed for chemical composition (DM, protein, fat, total carbohydrates, ash, soluble sugars.
trypsin inhibitor activity (TIA) and metals (Pb, As, Zn) and microbiologically (counts of total aerobic and mesophilic bacteria, yeasts, moulds, coliforms and coagulase-positive staphylococci). Results were satisfactory on all counts, and the grits had a high nutritional value in terms of protein content (55.6%) and TIA (85.3%). Prior to subsequent incorporation into food products, the grits were soaked in water (initial temp. 100 °C for 0.5-2.0 h or 24 0 for 1.5-3.0 h) to determine effects of soaking conditions on their moisture absorptivity, sugars content and leaching capacity and total protein content. As the samples soaked at 100 degree C gave more desirable results for these parameters, they were all drained and prepared in fresh water (water: grits ratio, 3:1) for 0.25-1.0 h, and then examined for taste and consistency. The 2 h wetting/1 h preparation gave the best organoleptic rating, and these samples were therefore used to make various food products (shortcake, pie filling pastes, soup, minced cutlets). The optimum concentration of soy grits, in terms of product protein and fat contents, calorific value, flavour, aroma and consistency, are tabulated, and ranged from 6.7% for a vegetable soup containing savory to 60% for a smoked mackerel pie filling paste (25).
The relationships between the operating variables of an experimental Collet-type extruder and the characteristics of corn flour to be used in the formulation of an instant cream soup were analysed. Water solublity and viscosity at 65 °C for 9, 10 and 11% flour concentration were evaluated in each extruded sample. Subsequently each such sample was used as an ingredient in a soup formulation, with the addition of soy okara as a protein source to improve the nutritional value. Sensory evaluation was used to determine the viscosity and solubility influence on creaminess. The results led to the conclusion that, for this particular extruder design, both flour moisture and screw rate significantly affect the characteristics of the flour, although the effects are opposite to those verified with a Brabender design. A precooked flour is obtained which gives an instant soup with good textural characteristics and high caloric density. For the extruder flour dispersions, a good correlation exists between viscosity and solubility, concentration and the shear rate. Sliminess was directly associated with solubility (26).
A pre-cooked soup mixture was prepared from defatted soybean and corn meals. The results indicated that a mixture containing a max. of 50% soybean meal yielded a product with good acceptability. Comparison between the soybean-corn meal mixture (30, 40 and 50% soybean meal) and a commercial product (Corn Soy-Milk) indicated that the former has a higher protein content (27).
A variety of dehydrated vegetables, dehydrated soup mixes (with or without dehydrated vegetables) and instant soup mixes were irradiated with 2.5, 5 and 10 kGy, and effects of the gamma-irradiation on microbiological and sensory qualities investigated. Tabulated data showed initial contamination of the dehydrated vegetables to be between 8000 and 2.52 x 10-6 aerobes/g, reduced to low levels by 5 kGy: max. residual contamination was 7900, reduced from 1.76 x 10-6 aerobes/g in asparagus powder and 15 000, reduced from 2.52 x 10-6 aerobes/g in zucchini. The microbial state of the dehydrated vegetables had no important effect on the level of contamination of the soup mixes: in cauliflower soup mix, the non-irradiated dried vegetables stored for 13 months contributed only 13.5% of the total microbial count. In asparagus cream mix, the non-irradiated asparagus powder stored for 13 months contributed virtually all the contaminating microorganisms. While the contamination of the soup mix could be reduced by 50% through 5 kGy irradiation of the asparagus powder. This was of no importance because of the generally low level of contamination irradiation in air had adverse effects on the sensory quality of parsley, zucchini, asparagus and onion powder, vacuum or Nitrogen irradiation, on onion powder only. No differences were observed in soup mixes after 13 months storage (28).
This study develops the potential of rice bran as a human food source, specifically as a substitute for wheat flour as a filler or thickener in dry cream soup mixes. A comparative analysis of wheat flour and rice bran was done prior to determining acceptable level of incorporation of rice bran in soup mix. Stabilized bran replaced 30%, 50%, 75% and 100% of the wheat flour fraction of a definite soup formulation. Among the samples containing rice bran, objective and sensory analyses of the dry and reconstituted mix indicate that the sample with 30% bran
substitution was the most acceptable. The nutrient contribution of rice bran in this soup mix was determined (29).
Pszczola- (2000) reported developments in ingredients for pasta dishes are discussed and novel pasta dishes are described with reference to: recommendations by the National Pasta Association. (30). Pszczola- (2000) reported innovations in soups and sauces are discussed with reference to current consumer perceptions of soups; flavourings; modified starches; use of cellulose to improve soup and sauce formulations; upscaling of traditional soups using fruit and savoury combinations use of soy sauce in soups and sauces; and development of nutraceutical soups fortified with vitamins, minerals and herbal extracts(31).
Reference may be made to a method for treating aqueous solution of soybean protein with enzymes [Sugisawa-K; Yamamoto-M; Yasuda-A; Nomura-Y; Amano-T US patent No. 4 687 739 (1987)] wherein Nutritious soups and beverages can be prepared from aqueous solutions of soybean proteins, but they have the disadvantage that they contain less Ca^* than milk. On addition of Ca^*, less than or equal 80% of the protein tends to precipitate making it difficult to prepare a Ca-fortified protein drink. If the soybean protein is first denatured by the action of heat or alkali, and then treated with a protease (e.g. bromelain, ficin, or microbial proteases from Streptomyces griseus, Aspergillus oryzae or Bacillus subtilis), its reactivity to Ca2+ is lost and there is no precipitation. Action by the proteases for 1-120 min at 25-95 ° C under intense agitation reduced the soybean protein to peptides of mol. wt. 10 000-20 000. 10-50 mM Ca salts, edible oils and emulsifiers can be added and the resulting mixture homogenized to give a bean soup drink has been described [1]
Reference may be made to a method of preparing albumin rich foodstuff raw materials [Oka-H; Itoga-K; Mochizuki-T, United states patent No. 4 311 715(1980)], wherein the preparation of a miso-like albumin rich food raw material, malt of rice or similar product is sterilized with ethanol, mixed with steamed or boiled soybeans, and the resultant mixture is aged at 20-50 degree C for approx. greater thani week. The product can be added to miso to prepare a low salt miso
product, or to prepare a raw material of mayonnaise and sauce. It can be mixed with butter or cheese to prepare a spread or can be used as raw material in the preparation of soup, confectionery products, bread etc [2].
Reference may be made to a complete diet food [Saiki-Y; Saiki-A, UK-Patent-Application No. 2 038 157A (1980)] wherein, the authors describe a mix for the manufacture of foods capable of reducing dietary calorie-intake to min. requirements comprises a well balanced combination of protein, calorie sources, vitamins and minerals. A biscuit is prepared from a mix comprising about 15% skim milk and 5% butter, whilst pre-mix for soup contains approx. 27% skim milk. Generally, the foods are made using wheat flour, skim milk, butter, eggs, cottonseed oil, sugar, polished rice, soy bean flour, vitamins and minerals [3].
Reference may made to a soup base [Sada-M, Japanese patent No. 11 119/70, (1970)} wherein, bread crumbs are malted, mixed with steamed globular soybeans and sodium chloride and fermented to yield a composition useful in the production of soup bases [4].
Reference may be made to a bean soup compositionfTakasago-Perfumery-Co Ltd ,Japanese patent No. 9 210/70, (1970)] wherein, Conidia obtained by culturing of exoleated soyabeans and malt with Aspergillus organisms is added to a bean soup and held at approximate equal to 45 degree C for approximate equal to 2h, after which the soup is heated and homogenized [5].
Reference may be made to a process for producing soybean protein material [Miyazaki-T; Kudo-T; Otani-Y; Hirotsuka-M, PCT-lnternational-Patent-Application; No. WO 96/18311 A1, JP 94-306769 (19941212) [Fuji Oil, Osaka, Japan],(1990)] wherein, a process for producing a soy protein is described. The process involves hydrolysing soy protein, in an aqueous system, with a proteinase to give a degree of hydrolysis of 5-20. If required 5-50 parts by wt. fat per 100 parts by wt. soy protein is emulsified before or after the hydrolysis step, which is then followed by drying. An emulsifier can be dispersed in any of the steps following emulsification of fats. The soy protein product is suitable for use in
pickles of high concn. or thick drinks (soup, etc.), and has good processing properties [6].
However preparation of soup with thermally processed defatted soy flour containing ingredients that provide improved consistency, flavor and taste has not been reported so far.
The main objective of the present invention is to obtain a formulation of instant soy soup mix containing defatted soy flour with enhanced sensory quality.
Another objective is preparation of thermally processed defatted soy flour. Yet another objective is preparation of processed semolina from wheat semolina (44 mesh, BS)
Yet another objective is preparation of pre gelatinized starch from corn starch by drum drying
Yet another objective is preparation of spice mix containing toasted and powdered pepper and cumin
Yet another objective is preparation of plain soup mix by blending the above ingredients taken in required proportion.
Yet another objective is preparation of tomato powder, onion powder garlic powder and preparation of a flavor base by mixing these ingredients along with monosodium glutamate as a flavor enhancer, in required proportion.
Yet another objective is preparation of flavored soup mix by blending the plain soup mix with the above flavor base
Yet another objective is blending flavored soup mix with dehydrated vegetables prepared using cabbage, carrot and beans.
pickles of high concn. or thick drinks (soup, etc.), and has good processing properties [6].
However preparation of soup with thermally processed defatted soy flour containing ingredients that provide improved consistency, flavor and taste has not been reported so far.
The main objective of the present invention is to provide a soy based soup formulation for improved soup mix containing defatted soy flour and a process thereof.
Another objective is preparation of thermally processed defatted soy flour. Yet another objective is preparation of processed semolina from wheat semolina (44 mesh, BS)
Yet another objective is preparation of pre gelatinized starch from corn starch by drum drying
Yet another objective is preparation of spice mix containing toasted and powdered pepper and cumin
Yet another objective is preparation of plain soup mix by blending the above ingredients taken in required proportion.
Yet another objective is preparation of tomato powder, onion powder garlic powder and preparation of a flavor base by mixing these ingredients along with monosodium glutamate as a flavor enhancer, in required proportion.
Yet another objective is preparation of flavored soup mix by blending the plain soup mix with the above flavor base
Yet another objective is blending flavored soup mix with dehydrated vegetables prepared using cabbage, carrot and beans.
still another objective is addition of other ingredients to the above soup mix and blending them thoroughly in a ribbon blender for improving the taste of the soup mix to obtain instant soy soup mix
Still another objective is addition of requisite amount of water to the dry mix and stirring to get uniform suspension and boiling it to get soy soup with enhanced sensory quality
Accordingly a soy based soup formulation for improved soup mix containing defatted soy flour and the said formulation comprises:
(Table Removed)
In an embodiment the addition of spice mix with mild flavor further decreases in the soup the undesirable notes beany aroma scale value in the range of 5.6 to 3.6 and bitter taste scale value in the range of 3.9 to 2.5, when Quantitative Descriptive Analysis of the soup was carried out on a scale of 15 cm anchored at 1.25 cm and 13.75 cm representing Detection Threshold and Saturation Threshold respectively.
In an embodiment the use of flavor base improves the flavor of soup by increasing the spicy note scale value in the range of 3.6 to 6.8, when Quantitative Descriptive Analysis of the soup was carried out on a scale of 15 cm anchored at 1.25 cm and 13.75 cm representing Detection Threshold and Saturation Threshold respectively.
In an embodiment the use of flavor base along with monosodium glutamate enhances the flavor of the soy soup by increasing the perception of spicy note scale value in the range of 6.8 to 7.4, when Quantitative Descriptive Analysis of the soup was carried out on a scale of 15 cm anchored at 1.25 cm and 13.75 cm representing Detection Threshold and Saturation Threshold respectively.
In an embodiment the incorporation of dehydrated vegetables improves the mouthfeel quality of the soup by decreasing the perception of undesirable notes such as beany aroma scale value in the range of 2.9 to 2.6, bitter taste scale value in the range of 2.2 to 1.6 and bitter after taste scale value in the range of 1.3 to 1.0, when Quantitative Descriptive Analysis of the soup was carried out on a scale of 15 cm anchored at 1.25 cm and 13.75 cm representing Detection Threshold and Saturation Threshold respectively.
In yet an another embodiment the addition of small amount of other ingredients such as powdered sugar and skim milk powder and very small amount of permitted coloring material such as tartrazine yellow, improves the sensory appeal of the soup by further decreasing bitter taste scale value in the range of 1.6 to 1.3 and bitter after taste scale value in the range of 1.0 to 0.8 and increasing overall quality scale value in the range of 8.5 to 9.6, when
Quantitative Descriptive Analysis of the soup was carried out on a scale of 15 cm anchored at 1.25 cm and 13.75 cm representing Detection Threshold and Saturation Threshold respectively.
In yet an another embodiment the instant soup mix does not contain any added fat or any anti oxidant.
In yet an another embodiment the instant soup mix has good shelf stability when packaged in metallised polyester pouches stored at ambient or refrigerated temperature as overall quality values ranged from 9.6-9.8 in the initial sample to 8.9-9.2 after 120 days under refrigerated conditions, when Quantitative Descriptive Analysis of the soup was carried out on a scale of 15 cm anchored at 1.25 cm and 13.75 cm representing Detection Threshold and Saturation Threshold respectively.
In yet an another embodiment the steaming of defatted soy flour reduces the undesirable beany aroma scale values in the range of 5.5 to 3.6 and bitter taste scale value in the range of 4.0 to 2.9 and bitter after taste scale value in the range of 2.8 to 1.8 when Quantitative Descriptive Analysis of the soup was carried out on a scale of 15 cm anchored at 1.25 cm and 13.75 cm representing Detection Threshold and Saturation Threshold respectively.
In yet an another embodiment the use of corn starch along with pre gelatinized starch in the mix improves the consistency scale value of the soup in the range of 5.2 to 8.6 when Quantitative Descriptive Analysis of the soup was carried out on a scale of 15 cm anchored at 1.25 cm and 13.75 cm representing Detection Threshold and Saturation Threshold respectively.
In yet an another embodiment the use of defatted soy flour minimizes processing steps for preparation soup mix as compared to that from soy beans.
In yet an another embodiment the serving of the hot soup kept in a water bath with thermostat, maintained at 58 -600C was found to be satisfactory by the panelists for carrying out sensory evaluation.
In yet an another embodiment the dry soup mix was reconstituted with water at a solid to water of 1: 12 mixed well to get uniform slurry and boiled for 3 to 4 minutes to get the soup containing 1.4-1.6 % protein, 2.6-3.4% carbohydrate and providing 16-20 K cal energy per 100 ml of soup.
In yet an another embodiment the preparation of soya based soup formulation comprising:
(a) steaming of defatted soy flour at atmospheric pressure (1.03 kg/cm2)for 10-20 min,
(b) breaking manually the lumps of defatted soy flour obtained from the previous step, to obtain uniform flour,
(c) sieving this flour through 60 mesh (BS sieve) to obtain flour containing particles of size ranging from 60-100 mesh (BS sieve),
(d) spreading this flour uniformly to 1-2 cm thickness layer, allowing it to equalibrate at 25-28° C for a period of 1-2 hours,
(e) thermal processing of wheat semolina by toasting over a medium flame for 4 to 5 minutes,
(f) spreading this semolina to 1-2 cm thickness layer, allowing to equalibrate at 25-28° C for a period of 1-2 hours,
(g) preparing pregelatinized corn starch by drum drying a slurry of 18-20% corn starch at 1.5 kg/cm^ pressure,
(h) powdering this pregelatinized starch in a waring blender,
(i) sieving this powdered pregelatinized starch through 44 mesh (BS sieve) to obtain uniform starch powder,
(j) mixing steamed, defatted soy flour, thermally processed semolina, corn starch and pregelatinized corn starch powder at a ratio of 3.3-3.5:2.5-3.5:16.0-20.0:0.4-0.6 well,
(k) blending the above ingredients with salt (4.0-6.0%),
(I) optimally toasting pepper and cumin in the ratio of 35.0-40.0:60.0-65.0,
(m) powdering the optimally toasted pepper and cumin in a waring blender,
(n) sieving powdered pepper and cumin through 44 mesh (BS sieve) to obtain spice mix,
(o) adding the above spice mix at a level of 4-6% to the blend obtained at step (k),
(p) preparing powdered tomato, onion and garlic by pureeing and drying of tomato, cleaning and slicing onion, cleaning and crushing garlic bulbs and separately drying in a hot air oven at 58-60 °C for 4-6 hours,
(q) blending these in a ratio of 1.8-2.2:1.5-1.7:0.7-0.9 to get a flavor base,
(r) mixing this flavor base with mono sodium glutamate as flavor enhancer in the ratio of 2.8-3.2:0.8-1.2,
(s) adding this flavor base and flavor enhancer to the mix at step (o)
(t) dicing cleaned carrot, shredding cleaned cabbage and cutting cleaned beans into 3-4 mm pieces,
(u) blanching the above vegetables for 3-5 minutes,
(v) drying the blanched vegetables at 58-60°C in a shelf dryer for 4-6 hr,
(w) mixing them in a ratio of 0.8-1.2: 0.8-1.2: 0.8-1.2 to get dehydrated vegetable mix and blending with the product obtained at step (s),
(x) blending this with powdered sugar 60 mesh (BS sieve), skim milk powder and tartrazine yellow colourant at a ratio of 3.5-4.5:1.8-2.2:0.008-0.012 to obtain the soy based soup mix having 17.5-19.1% protein, 31.6-40.6 carbohydrate and providing 196-236 K cals of energy per 100 g of mix,
(y) reconstituting at a solids : water ratio of 1:12 and boiling for 3 to 4 min. to get soy soup with enhanced sensory quality having 1.4-1.6 % protein, 2.6-3.4% carbohydrate and providing 16-20 K cal energy per 100 ml of soup.
In yet an another embodiment the thermally processed defatted soy flour was prepared by steaming at atmospheric pressure (10 to 20 minutes) as described earlier 327/Del/02, powdered and equilibrated at 22 to 27° C.
In yet an another embodiment the processed wheat semolina (44 mesh, BS) was prepared by toasting semolina over a medium flame for 4 to 5 minute and equilibrating at ambient temperature (22 to 27° C) for 1-2 hours.
In yet an another embodiment the pre gelatinized starch was prepared by drum drying a slurry of (18 -20%) corn starch at 1.5 Kg/cm2 steam pressure powdered and sieved through 44 mesh (BS) sieve.
In yet an another embodiment the spice mix was prepared by powdering optimally toasted pepper and cumin in a ratio of 37: 63.
In yet an another embodiment the plain soup mix was prepared by blending thermally processed defatted soy flour: processed wheat semolina: corn starch: pre gelatinized starch: salt: spice mix at a ratio of 33-35:2.5-3.5:16-20:0.4-0.6:4-6:4-6 in a ribbon blender to get plain soup mix
In yet an another embodiment the tomato powder was prepared by drying tomato puree at 58 to 60° C for 4 to 6 hours followed by powdering.
In yet an another embodiment the cleaned and sliced onion and garlic were separately dried at 58 to 60 °C for 4 to 6 hours and the dehydrated material was powdered to get the onion and garlic powder.
In yet an another embodiment the flavor base was prepared by mixing tomato powder: onion powder: garlic powder along with monosodium glutamate as a flavor enhancer at a ratio of 1.8-2.2:1.5-1.7: 0.7-0.9: 1.8-2.2
In yet an another embodiment the flavored soup mix was prepared by blending plain soup mix with flavor base at a ratio of 80: 4.
In yet an another embodiment the dehydrated vegetable mix was prepared by washed, cleaned and sliced cabbage, washed, peeled and sliced carrot, cleaned and trimmed beans cut to 3 to 4 mm bits, blanched for 3-5 minutes in boiling water bath and shelf dried at 58 to 602 C for 4 to 6 hours and mixing at a ratio of 1:1:1.
In yet an another embodiment the flavored soup mix was blended with dehydrated vegetables (74-76:4-5) to get vegetable soup mix.
In yet an another embodiment the other ingredients such as powdered sugar, skim milk powder and coloring compound such as tartrazine yellow were mixed at a ratio of 3.5-4.5:1.8-2.2:0.008-0.012 and added to the soup mix (1 to 1.5%) and blended in a ribbon blender to get the instant soy soup mix having 17.5-19.1% protein, 31.6-40.6 carbohydrate and providing 196-236 K cals of energy per 100 g of mix.
Novelty
The use of suitable processing conditions for bulk components, constituents of spice mix or flavor base and addition of other ingredients and blending them in appropriate proportions resulting in a soup mix containing thermally processed defatted soy flour with enhanced sensory quality has been achieved which is not reported so far.
The following examples have been given by way of illustrating and should not be construed to limit the scope of the present invention.
Examples

(Table Removed)
Preparation of Soup mix containing defatted soy flour
Defatted soy flour was steamed at atmospheric pressure to obtain thermally processed defatted flour. Fine wheat semolina (40-44 mesh, BS) was toasted for 4-5 min. to obtain processed semolina. This was mixed with salt and spice mix to get plain soup mix containing defatted soy flour.
Preparation of Soup from the mix containing defatted soy flour: The mix was
reconstituted in water with a solid to water ratio 1:12 and mixed well to get uniform slurry and boiled for 3-4 min to get the soup.
Viscosity of the soup at 58°C -60°C was measured using Brookfield Synchrolectric viscometer (with LVT model spindle No.3) at shear rate of 1.0 -1.1 f /sec.
Sensory evaluation of the soup was carried out by a trained panel using Quantitative Descriptive Analysis (QDA) on a scale of 15 cm. The samples were served hot at 58-60°C to the panelists. The results are shown in Table 1.
Table 1. Mean Scores for Sensory attributes of Soup containing defatted soy flour

(Table Removed)
The viscosity of soup from formulation 1 containing fine wheat semolina alone as major ingredient was 100 cps while that of formulations 2, 3 and 4 was 270, 300 and 320 cps respectively. Soup from formulations 2, 3 and 4 had beany aroma and bitter taste along with bitter aftertaste. However soup containing untreated defatted soy flour had higher values for these attributes as compared those containing defatted soy flour steamed for 10 and 20 min. The soup sample containing defatted soy flour steamed for 20 min. had the lowest scores for these undesirable notes. Therefore further work was carried out with this flour.
Example 2

(Table Removed)
Preparation of Soup mix with different levels of defatted soy flour and corn starch and pre gelatinized starch:
Defatted soy flour was steamed at atmospheric pressure to obtain thermally processed defatted flour. Fine wheat semolina (40-44 mesh, BS) was toasted for 4-5 min. to obtain processed semolina. This was mixed with defatted soy flour (steamed for 20 min.) at three levels (30%, 40% and 50% of the mix) and corn starch was added at 40%, 30% and 25% levels respectively along with salt and spice mix. The mix was reconstituted in water with solid to water ratio 1:12 and mixed well to get uniform slurry and boiled for 3-4 min to get the soup.
Pregelatinized corn starch was prepared by drum drying a uniform slurry (18-20%) of corn starch at 1.5 Kg/cm^ steam pressure, powdering the resultant
material and sieving it (44 mesh, BS). This was mixed with formulation 6 at two levels of 0.6% and 1.2% to get formulations 8 and 9 respectively (plain soup mix).
Preparation of Soup from plain soup mix containing defatted soy flour and pregelatinized corn starch: The mix was reconstituted in water with a solid to water ratio 1:12 and mixed well to get uniform slurry and boiled for 3-4 min to get the soup. Viscosity of the soup at 58°C -60°C was measured using Brookfield Synchrolectric viscometer (with LVT model spindle No.3) at shear rate of 1.0 -1.1 f /sec. Sensory evaluation of the soup was carried out by a trained panel using Quantitative Descriptive Analysis (QDA) on a scale of 15 cm. The samples were served hot at 58-600C to the panelists. The results are shown in Table 2.
Table 2. Mean Scores for Soup containing Defatted Soy flour with Corn starch and Pre gelatinized starch

(Table Removed)
Mean scores in the same row with different alphabets differ significantly (p Preparation of soup mix containing flavor base and flavor enhancer.
Tomato powder was prepared by cleaning fresh and wholesome tomatoes, mashing, filtering to remove the thin cuticle and concentrating in a steam jacketed kettle to a solid concentration of 55 to 65% to get tomato puree, which was dried in a shelf drier at 58 to 60° C for 4 to 6 hours. Cleaned and sliced onion and garlic were also dried in a shelf drier at 58 to 60 °C for 4 to 6 hours to get the onion and garlic powder. A flavor base was prepared by mixing tomato powder: onion powder: garlic powder at a ratio of 2: 1.6: 0.8: 2. Monosodium glutamate was added as a flavor enhancer at a flavor base; flavor enhancer ratio of 2:1, Flavored soup mix was prepared by blending plain soup mix with flavor base at 5% level.
Preparation of Soup from soup mix containing defatted soy flour with flavor base and flavor enhancer
The mix was reconstituted in water with a solid to water ratio 1:12 and mixed well to get uniform slurry and boiled for 3-4 min to get the soup. Viscosity of the soup at 58°C -60°C was measured using Brookfield Synchrolectric viscometer (with LVT model spindle No.3) at shear rate of 1.0 -1.1 f /sec. Sensory evaluation of the soup was carried out by a trained panel using Quantitative Descriptive Analysis (QDA) on a scale of 15 cm. The samples were served hot at 58-60°C to the panelists. The results are shown in Table 3.
Table 3. Mean Scores for Soup containing Defatted Soy flour with Flavor base and flavor enhancer

(Table Removed)
Mean scores in the same row with different alphabets differ significantly (p Viscosity of soup from formulations 8,10 and 11 were very close as the values were 335, 340 and 340 cps respectively. The spicy aroma showed a significant increase while the beany aroma, bitter taste and bitter aftertaste showed considerable decrease thereby enhancing the overall quality of soup. Addition of flavor enhancer to the flavor base was effective in reducing the perception of bitter taste to a greater extent and increased the perception of spicy note and further improved the overall quality. Therefore formulation 11 was chosen for further studies.

(Table Removed)
small amount of pre gelatinized starch (0.6%) did not change the viscosity drastically (335 cps) in formulation 8 whereas addition of pregelatinized starch at 1.2% in formulation 9 significantly increased the viscosity (390 cps) and the perceived consistency also showed a higher value. Addition of defatted soy flour above 40% (formulation 7) resulted in increased beany aroma and bitter taste along with more of bitter after taste. However, addition of small amount of pregelatinized starch improved the quality of soup by slight reduction in the above undesirable notes. Therefore formulation 8 was used for further work.
Example 3

(Table Removed)
Mono Sodium Glutamate
Cooked Vegetables

(Table Removed)
Preparation of flavored soup mix containing vegetables.
Thirty g each of washed, cleaned and sliced cabbage, washed, peeled and sliced carrot, washed, cleaned, crude fiber free beans cut to 3 to 4 mm bits and cooked in a pressure cooker at 15 lb pressure for 15 min. and added to formulation 11 to get vegetable soup.
Dehydrated vegetable mix was prepared using 1 kg each of vegetables by mixing at a ratio of 1:1:1 of washed, cleaned and sliced cabbage, washed, peeled and sliced carrot, washed, cleaned crude fiber free beans cut to 3 to 4 mm bits, blanched for 3-5 minutes in boiling water and shelf dried at 58 to 60 ° C for 4 to 6 hours. Flavored soup mix from formulation 11 was blended with dehydrated vegetables at 5% to get vegetable soup mix.
Preparation of Soup from flavored soup mix containing vegetables
The mix was reconstituted in water with a solid to water ratio 1:12 and mixed well to get uniform slurry and boiled for 3-4 min to get the soup. Viscosity of the soup at 58°C -60°C was measured using Brookfield Synchrolectric viscometer (with LVT model spindle No.3) at shear rate of 1.0-1.1 f/sec. Sensory evaluation of the soup was carried out by a trained panel using Quantitative Descriptive Analysis (QDA) on a scale of 15 cm. The samples were served hot at 58-60°C to the panelists. The results are shown in Table 4.
Table 4. Mean Scores for Soup containing Defatted Soy flour with Flavor base and Vegetables

(Table Removed)
Mean scores in the same row with different alphabets differ significantly (p (Table Removed)
Preparation of soup mix with dehydrated vegetables containing other ingredients
Addition of minor ingredients exerts its influence on mouth feel characteristics and their effect on soup mix with dehydrated vegetables was studied. Minor ingredients such as powdered sugar, skim milk powder and coloring compound such as tartrazine yellow were added (at 1%, 0.5% and 0.01 % of the total weight of the mix) to soup mix and blended in a ribbon blender to get the instant soy soup mix formulations 14 to 16.
Preparation of Soup from mix containing vegetables and other ingredients
The mix was reconstituted in water with a solid to water ratio 1:12 and mixed well to get uniform slurry and boiled for 3-4 min to get the soup. Viscosity of the soup at SS^C -60°C was measured using Brookfield Synchrolectric viscometer (with LVT model spindle No.3) at shear rate of 1.0-1.1 f/sec. Sensory evaluation of
the soup was carried out by a trained panel using Quantitative Descriptive Analysis (QDA) on a scale of 15 cm. The samples were served hot at 58-60°C to the panelists. The results are shown in Table 5.
Table 5. Mean Scores for Soup containing Defatted Soy flour with Flavor base, Vegetables and other ingredients

(Table Removed)
Mean scores in the same row with different alphabets differ significantly (p Shelf life studies
The instant soup nnix was prepared in 1 kg bulk and packets of 50 g were made using metalised polyester pouches and stored at ambient conditions (27°C, 65% RH), and under refrigerated conditions. Samples were withdrawn at periodical intervals of 30, 60, 90 and 120 days. Soup was prepared by reconstituting the mix in water with a solid to water ratio of 1: 12 and mixed well to get uniform slurry and boiled for 3-4 min to get the soup. Sensory evaluation of the soup was carried out by a trained panel using Quantitative Descriptive Analysis (QDA) on a scale of 15 cm. The samples were served hot at 58-60°C to the panelists. The results are shown in Table 6.
Table 6 Mean scores for soup prepared from improved formulation after storage

(Table Removed)
The results indicated that the improved soup mix exhibited good shelf stability at both the storage conditions up to 120 days as the values for undesirable notes did not show any significant increase as compared to that after first withdrawal.
Summary
Use of defatted soy flour minimizes processing steps for preparation soup mix as compared to that from soybeans. Steaming of defatted soy flour reduces the undesirable beany and biter notes in the soup to a great extent. Addition of spice mix with mild flavor further decreases the undesirable notes in the soup.
Use of corn starch along with pre gelatinized starch in the mix enhances the consistency of the soup.
Use of flavor base along with flavor enhancer improves the flavor of the soy soup. Incorporation of dehydrated vegetables adds to the mouthfeel quality of the soup.
Addition-of small amount of other ingredients such as powdered sugar and skim milk powder and very small amount of permitted coloring material such as tartrazine yellow, improves the sensory appeal of the soup.
Slight variations in quantities (5-10%) of added defatted soy flour in the final mix does not affect the overall quality of the soup.
It has good shelf stability when packaged in metallised polyester pouches stored at ambient or refrigerated temperature.
Advantages
Use of the thermally processed defatted soy flour with spice mix and flavor base resulted In improvement of the nutritional and sensory quality of soup mix.
The corn starch in the formulation can be replaced with starches from other sources such as cereal, millet or tuber at suitable levels.
The mix has compatibility for blending with spice mix or flavor base of regional choice after suitable processing.
The mix has protein content of 17.5-19.1 % which can be reconstituted to serve the purpose of emergency ration food or convalescent food.
It could be suitably reconstituted by adjusting composition of ingredients and consistency to serve several purposes such as, salt based beverage, meal starter, adjunct for snack food, as a side dish etc., as flavored soups are becoming more popular compared to plain soups.
It contains no added fat or any antioxidant and has good shelf stability.










We claim:
1. A soy based soup formulation for improved soup mix containing thermally
processed defatted soy flour, the said formulation comprising:
(a) Wheat semolinaffine, toasted) 2.5 to 3.5 wt. (g %)
(b)Corn starch 16 to 20 wt. (g %)
(c)Pre gelatinized corn starch 0.4 to 0.6 wt. (g %)
(d)Characterized in that thermally
processed defatted soy flour 33 to 35 wt.(g%)
(e)Salt 5 to 7wt. (g %)
(f)Spice mix (toasted pepper and cumin) 3 to 5 wt. (g %)
(g)Flavor base (Dried and powdered
tomato, onion, garlic) 2.8 to 3.2 wt.(g%)
(h)Flavor enhancer (Mono sodium glutamate) 0.8 to 1.2 wt. (g %)
(i)Dehydrated vegetables (Cabbage, carrot and beans) 4 to 5 wt. (g %)
(j)Sugar 3 to 5 wt. (g %)
(k)Skim milk powder 1.8 to 2.2 wt. (g %)
(l)Tartrazine yellow 0.008 to 0.012 wt. (g %)
2. A process for the preparation of soy based soup formulation for improved
soup mix containing thermally processed defatted soy flour the said
process comprising:
(a) characterized in that thermally processed defatted soy flour at
atmospheric pressure (1.03 kg/cm2)for 10-20 min,
(b) breaking manually the lumps of thermally processed defatted soy flour obtained from the previous step, to obtain uniform flour,
(c) sieving this flour through 60 mesh (BS sieve) to obtain flour containing particles of size ranging from 60-100 mesh (BS sieve),
(d) spreading this flour uniformly to 1-2 cm thickness layer, allowing it to equalibrate at 25-28° C for a period of 1-2 hours,
(e) thermal processing of wheat semolina by toasting over a medium flame for 4 to 5 minutes,
(f) spreading this semolina to 1-2 cm thickness layer, allowing to equalibrate at 25-28° C for a period of 1-2 hours,
(g) preparing pregelatinized corn starch by drum drying a slurry of 18-20% corn starch at 1.5 kg/cm2 pressure,
(h) powdering this pregelatinized starch in a waring blender,
(i) sieving this powdered pregelatinized starch through 44 mesh (BS sieve) to obtain uniform starch powder,
(j) mixing steamed, defatted soy flour, thermally processed semolina, corn starch and pregelatinized corn starch powder at a ratio of 3.3-3.5:2.5-3.5:16.0-20.0:0.4-0.6 well,
(k) blending the above ingredients with salt (4.0-6.0%),
(I) optimally toasting pepper and cumin in the ratio of 35.0-40.0:60.0-65.0,
(m) powdering the optimally toasted pepper and cumin in a waring blender,
(n) sieving powdered pepper and cumin through 44 mesh (BS sieve) to obtain spice mix,
(o) adding the above spice mix at a level of 4-6% to the blend obtained at step (k),
(p) preparing powdered tomato, onion and garlic by pureeing and drying of tomato, cleaning and slicing onion, cleaning and crushing garlic bulbs and separately drying in a hot air oven at 58-60 °C for 4-6 hours,
(q) blending these in a ratio of 1.8-2.2:1.5-1.7:0.7-0.9 to get a flavor base,
(r) mixing this flavor base with mono sodium glutamate as flavor enhancer in the ratio of 2.8-3.2:0.8-1.2,
(s) adding this flavor base and flavor enhancer to the mix at step (o)
(t) dicing cleaned carrot, shredding cleaned cabbage and cutting cleaned beans into 3-4 mm pieces,
(u) blanching the above vegetables for 3-5 minutes,
(v) drying the blanched vegetables at 58-60°C in a shelf dryer for 4-6 hr,
(w) mixing them in a ratio of 0.8-1.2: 0.8-1.2: 0.8-1.2 to get dehydrated vegetable mix and blending with the product obtained at step (s),
(x) blending this with powdered sugar 60 mesh (BS sieve), skim milk powder and tartrazine yellow colourant at a ratio of 3.5-4.5:1.8-2.2:0.008-0.012 to obtain the soy based soup mix having 17.5-19.1% protein, 31.6-40.6 carbohydrate and providing 196-236 K cals of energy per 100 g of mix,
(y) reconstituting at a solids : water ratio of 1:12 and boiling for 3 to 4 min. to get soy soup with enhanced sensory quality having 1.4-1.6 % protein, 2.6-3.4% carbohydrate and providing 16-20 K cal energy per 100 ml of soup.
3. A process as claimed in claim 2, wherein thermally processed defatted soy flour is prepared by steaming at atmospheric pressure (10 to 20 minutes).
4. A process as claimed in claim 2, wherein processed wheat semolina (44 mesh, BS) is prepared by toasting semolina over a medium flame for 4 to 5 minute and equilibrating at ambient temperature (22 to 27° C) for 1-2 hours.
5. A process as claimed in claim 2, wherein a spice mix is prepared by
powdering optimally toasted pepper and cumin in a ratio of 37: 63.
6. A process as claimed in claim 2, wherein a plain soup mix is prepared by
blending thermally processed defatted soy flour: processed wheat
semolina: corn starch: pre gelatinized starch: salt: spice mix at a ratio of 33-
35:2.5-3.5:16-20:0.4-0.6:4-6:4-6 in a ribbon blender to get plain soup mix.
7. A process as claimed in claim 2, wherein flavored soup mix is prepared by
blending plain soup mix with flavor base at a ratio of 80: 4.
8. A process as claimed in claim 2, wherein dehydrated vegetable mix is
prepared by washed, cleaned and sliced cabbage, washed, peeled and
sliced carrot, cleaned and trimmed beans cut to 3 to 4 mm bits, blanched
for 3-5 minutes in boiling water bath and shelf dried at 58 to 60 ° C for 4 to
6 hours and mixing at a ratio of 1:1:1.
9. A process as claimed in claim 2, wherein flavored soup mix is blended with
dehydrated vegetables (74-76:4-5) to get vegetable soup mix.
10. A soy based soup formulation for improved soup mix containing thermally
processed defatted soy flour substantially as herein described with
reference to the examples accompanying this specification.

Documents:

464-DEL-2004-Abstract-(21-12-2009).pdf

464-del-2004-abstract.pdf

464-DEL-2004-Claims-(01-06-2010).pdf

464-DEL-2004-Claims-(21-12-2009).pdf

464-del-2004-claims.pdf

464-DEL-2004-Correspondence-Others-(01-06-2010).pdf

464-DEL-2004-Correspondence-Others-(21-12-2009).pdf

464-del-2004-correspondence-others.pdf

464-del-2004-correspondence-po.pdf

464-DEL-2004-Description (Complete)-(21-12-2009).pdf

464-del-2004-description (complete).pdf

464-del-2004-form-1.pdf

464-del-2004-form-18.pdf

464-DEL-2004-Form-2-(21-12-2009).pdf

464-del-2004-form-2.pdf

464-DEL-2004-Form-3-(21-12-2009).pdf

464-del-2004-form-3.pdf

464-del-2004-form-5.pdf


Patent Number 241572
Indian Patent Application Number 464/DEL/2004
PG Journal Number 29/2010
Publication Date 16-Jul-2010
Grant Date 13-Jul-2010
Date of Filing 16-Mar-2004
Name of Patentee COUNCIL OF SCIENTIFIC AND INDUSTRIAL RESEARCH
Applicant Address RAFI MARG, NEW DELHI-110001, INDIA.
Inventors:
# Inventor's Name Inventor's Address
1 NUGGE HALLI SAMAPATHKUMARACHARA SUSHEELAMMA CENTRAL FOOD TECHNOLOGICAL RESEARCH INSTITUTE MYSORE, INDIA.
2 MYSORE RAMASWAMY ASHA CENTRAL FOOD TECHNOLOGICAL RESEARCH INSTITUTE MYSORE, INDIA.
3 KODANGALA KESHAVA BHAT CENTRAL FOOD TECHNOLOGICAL RESEARCH INSTITUTE MYSORE, INDIA.
PCT International Classification Number A23 L 1/40
PCT International Application Number N/A
PCT International Filing date
PCT Conventions:
# PCT Application Number Date of Convention Priority Country
1 NA