Title of Invention

MODIFIED SODIUM CARBONATE CARRIER MATERIAL

Abstract N/A
Full Text C4423/C
FORM - 2
THE PATENTS ACT, 1970
(39 of 1970)
&
The Patents Rules, 2003
COMPLETE SPECIFICATION
(See Section 10 and Rule 13)
MODIFIED SODIUM CARBONATE CARRIER MATERIAL
HINDUSTAN UNILEVER LIMITED, a company incorporated under the Indian Companies Act, 1913 and having its registered office at Hindustan Lever House, 165/166, Backbay Reclamation, Mumbai -400 020, Maharashtra, India
The following specification particularly describes the invention and the manner in which it is to be performed

WO 2006/081930

PCT/EP2006/000320

MODIFIED SODIUM CARBONATE CARRIER MATERIAL
This invention relates to modified sodium carbonate carrier material, a process for its manufacture; and to the use of the carrier materials, particularly in detergent 5 formulations.
US 4 900 466 discloses that both sodium carbonate monohydrate and Burkeite may be converted to a more desirable crystal form in a slurry by the addition of a low level of a polycarboxylate material, not later than the
10 relevant salts, and then drying the slurry. The maximum
water content of the slurries used was 53.5%. This process could be utilised to form a detergent base, a whole detergent powder, or any intermediate product. Such powders are said to be capable of absorbing and retaining
15 substantial quantities of liquid nonionic surfactants and other liquid organic detergent components.
The crystal growth modifiers used in US 4 900 4 66 are preferably homopolymers or copolymers of acrylic acid or maleic acid. Of especial interest are polyacrylates,
20. ,acryljL.c_ acid/maleic.acjLd_cpp_olyiriers_, _and .acrylic.
phosphinates. Suitable polymeric crystal growth modifiers are said to include salts of polyacrylic acid, ethylene/maleic acid copolymers, methyl vinyl ether/maleic acid copolymers, acrylic acid/maleic acid copolymers, and
25 acrylic phosphinates. These types of crystal growth
modifier are not readily biodegradable. This is a problem for a material that may be used in a laundry washing process.

WO 2006/081930

PCT/EP2006/000320

2 -
EP 1 306 424A also describes a process for modification of sodium carbonate. The material is said to be dried from a solution or a slurry. In the examples there is a particulate material present in the liquid before it is 5 dried. In the examples the maximum water content of the slurry before drying is said to be 53%.
According to the invention there is provided a process comprising the steps of:
(i) preparing a solution of sodium carbonate, an 10 effective amount of a crystal growth modifier which is selected from the group comprising 'polyacrylates, polyaspartates and polyaspartic acids; and optionally one or more anionic and/or nonionic detergent-active compounds, one or more detergency builders and/or one 15 or more further heat-insensitive detergent
components; whereby crystal growth-modified sodium carbonate is formed;
(ii) drying the solution to form a dry solid carrier material;
2-0 (-ii-i--)---optionally--incorporating--i-nto— the- -dry- soli-d-ea-r-rie-r-
material one or more detergent components in liquid form and/or mixing the dried solid material with one or more solid detergent components.
The solution formed in step (i) advantageously has less than 25 35% solids to ensure that a slurry is not formed.
Preferably it has about 30% or less by weight dissolved solids.

WO 2006/081930

PCTVEP2006/000320

- 3 -
The solution may be dried by any method, for example, spray drying, air drying, oven drying, drum drying, ring drying, freeze drying, solvent drying or microwave drying.
The process may be used to produce a predominantly inorganic 5 base material produced by steps (i) and (ii) of the process, from an aqueous solution consisting essentially of water, the crystal growth modifier, sodium carbonate and if present, sodium sulphate. This granular product is useful either as the principal carrier material in a detergent 10 composition or as a carrier material for one particular
ingredient. The granular products of the process may also contain surfactants and other components commonly encountered in detergent compositions, incorporated before drying, or postdosed, or both, as appropriate.
15 According to a second aspect of the invention there is
provided a solid material of high liquid carrying capacity, the solid material comprising crystal growth modified sodium carbonate wherein the solid material further comprises a polymeric crystal growth modifier selected from polyaspartic
20 acids and polyaspartates.
The preferred polymeric crystal growth modifiers have a molecular weight of at least 1000, advantageously from 3500 to 300000, especially from 4000 to 250000. Solid materials having especially good carrying capacities may be prepared 25 using polyaspartate crystal growth modifiers having
molecular weights in the 3500 to 100000 range, especially 4000 to 70000 and more especially 5000 to 70000. All molecular weights quoted herein are those provided by the manufacturers.

WO 2006/081930

PCT/EP2006/000320

- 4 -
Polyaspartate is a biopolymer synthesised from L-aspartic acid, a natural amino acid. Due in part to the carboxylate groups, polyaspartate has similar properties to polyacrylates. One preferred type of polyaspartate is 5 thermal polyaspartate or TPA. This has the benefit of being biodegradable to environmentally benign products, such as carbon dioxide and water, which avoids the need for removal of TPA during sewage treatment, and its disposal to landfill.
10 TPA may be made by first heating aspartic acid to
temperatures above 180°C to produce polysuccinimide. Then the polysuccinimide is ring opened to form polyaspartate. Because the ring-can open in two possible ways, two polymer linkages are observed, an a-linkage and a (3-linkage.
15 Amounts of from 0.1 to 20% by weight of the crystal growth modifier, preferably from 0.2 to 5% by weight, based on the total amount of sodium carbonate and, if present, sodium sulphate, are generally sufficient to provide the improved carrying capacity, especially when used in the process of
20 the invention.
For environmental reasons, the preferred crystal growth modifier is polyaspartate.
Dried crystal-growth-modified sodium carbonates made by the process of the invention display good flow properties, and 25 resistance to caking. These materials may thus be used as bases for detergent powders in which all components are incorporated in solution before it is dried. Their main advantage, however, lies in their capacity to take up and hold large quantities of liquid components, so their use is

WO 2006/081930

PCT/EP2006/000320

- 5 -
of particular benefit as a carrier material in compositions which include an ingredient that is postdosed (i.e. introduced after drying) in liquid form. That ingredient may be inherently liquid at processing temperatures, or it 5 may first be liquefied by melting or dissolving in a
solvent. Examples of such ingredients are perfumes, oils, and aqueous solutions; but the invention is of particular interest concerning nonionic surfactants and aqueous pastes of anionic surfactants, such as sodium lauryl ether sulphate 10 (SLES).
Nonionic surfactants preferably used in the process and compositions of the invention are the primary and secondary
alcohol ethoxylates, especially the C12 -C15 primary and
15 secondary alcohols ethoxylated with an average of from 3 to 20 moles of ethylene oxide per mole of alcohol. The use of the carrier material of the invention is especially advantageous for nonionic surfactants having an average degree of ethoxylation of 10 or below, which are generally
20 liquid at room temperature and often cannot be spray-dried because they give rise to unacceptable levels of tower -emission-.- {"-bl-u-e-smo-k-e" -©-r-- 'ip-lumi-ng"■)--.■ - An- av.era-g@-d.eg-ree--©-f-ethoxylation in the range 3 to 9 is most preferred.
25 The crystal-growth-modified sodium carbonate of the
invention provides an excellent means for incorporating liquid nonionic surfactants into detergents powders. A dried base is first prepared (steps (i) and (ii) of the process of the invention) and the nonionic surfactant is
30 then added in step (iii) of the process of the invention.
The addition can, for example, be achieved by spraying on of

WO 2006/081930

PCT7EP2006/000320

- 6 -
the nonionic surfactant, or by admixture or granulation in a high shear mixer.
This process can be utilised in various ways in a detergent composition. The dried base powder or carrier prepared in 5 step (ii) may incorporate any other heat-insensitive
components, for example, anionic surfactants or builders, that are to be included in the product. In this case, admixture with other solid components is optional, and may be omitted altogether, for example, in a powder containing 10 no bleaching components or enzymes.
Alternatively, the dried base powder of step (ii) may be a predominantly inorganic carrier intended specially as a vehicle for the nonionic surfactant or anionic surfactant, and may perhaps form only a minor part of the final product. 15 In step (iii) it will then be mixed with the main product, which might itself have been dried in a separate operation.
Various intermediate options are also possible.
The total level of sodium carbonate and (if present) sodium sulphate in a final product according to the invention may
20 vary.,between..wide..limits. -. Ixupxoduc-ts--w.her-e--.the-modi-f ied-salt is the principal carrier in the composition, the level is preferably at least 15% by weight and more preferably at least 20% by weight, but much lower levels may be encountered when the crystal-growth-modified material is
25 used only as a carrier for a minor ingredient. The level of carrier used may provide non-ionic levels of over 1%, advantageously up to 15% in a detergent formulation.

WO 2006/081930

PCT/EP2006/000320

- 7 -
The amount of crystal-growth-modifying polymer in such products may be higher than the level required for effective crystal growth modification, because the polymer may also fulfil other functions, such as structuring, in a detergent 5 powder. This is especially likely in compositions
containing only low levels of the relevant salts (sodium carbonate, sodium sulphate) based on the final product.
When the carrier is used in detergent compositions in
accordance with the present invention the compositions may 10 contain any ingredients conventionally present, notably
anionic surfactants, both soap and synthetic; nonionic
surfactants, as already discussed; detergency builders;
alkali metal silicates; antiredeposition agents;
antiincrustation agents; fluorescers; enzymes; bleaches, 15 bleach precursors and bleach stabilisers; perfumes; and
dyes.
Anionic surfactants are well known to those skilled in the detergents arts. Examples include alkylbenzene sulphonates, particularly sodium alkylbenzene sulphonates having an
20 average chain length of C12; primary and secondary alcohol
^urpKat'es;'"parTi"curarly soaXunT C12 "-C15 "primary alcohol
sulphates; olefin sulphonates; alkane sulphonates; and fatty acid ester sulphonates.
It may also be desirable to include one or more soaps of 25 fatty acids. The soaps that can be used are preferably
sodium soaps derived from naturally occurring fatty acids, for example the fatty acids from coconut oil, beef tallow, or sunflower oil.

WO 2006/081930

PCT/EP2006/000320

- 8 -
The sodium carbonate present in the detergent composition acts as a detergency builder, but it may nevertheless be advantageous to include other builders. Phosphate builders, notably alkali metal tripolyphosphates, orthophosphates and 5 pyrophosphates, may be present, but the invention is of especial applicability to zero-phosphorous compositions. Non-P builders that may be present include, but are not ■restricted to, crystalline and amorphous aluminosilicates, layered silicates, soaps, sulphonated fatty acid salts,
10 citrates, nitrilotriacetates and carboxymethyloxysuccinates; it is within the scope of the invention for the amount of such other builders to exceed the amount of sodium carbonate present. Calcite or other crystallisation seeds may be included to increase the builder efficiency of the sodium
15 carbonate.
The foregoing description has been concerned primarily with detergent compositions suitable for washing fabrics. Compositions in accordance with the invention may also find use, for example, in laundry pre-treatment products,
20 household cleaning products and personal products (toiletries), pesticides, pharmaceutical products, ^griero-l1ruTa±--pxoducrfcs- and'-irrdustTial ""pr"dduct*s\"" ""Th"~all"~ fields of use, the product may simply consist of the predominantly inorganic carrier material having a liquid or
25 liquifiable material sorbed thereon, or other materials may be incorporated via the liquid, by postdosing, or both; and the dried predominantly inorganic carrier material characteristic of the invention may form a major or minor part of the product.

WO 2006/081930

PCT/EP2006/000320

- 9 -
One highly preferred field of use for the inorganic carrier material of the invention is in fabric washing detergent powders. This preferred class of compositions according to the invention falls into two subclasses: powders in which 5 the inorganic carrier material of the invention is the principle base or matrix material and is present at a substantial level; and powders in which the predominantly inorganic carrier material is used in an "adjunct", that is to say, it is used as a carrier material for a particular
10 ingredient, such as a liquid nonionic surfactant, and the adjunct is postdosed to a base powder of a different type. In the second case, the inorganic carrier material of the invention may be present at a relatively low level. For example at a level of 1 to 7% or even lower if, for
15 instance, perfume is sorbed onto the carrier.
Examples of detergent compositions utilising the inorganic carrier material of the invention as the principal base or matrix of the powder include the following:
(i) Zero-P carbonate-built powders
20 A detergent powder intended as a very low-sudsing product for washing machine use may typically contain nonionic surfactant only, at a level of 5 to 30% by weight. A medium-sudsing product suitable for use in top-loading washing machines may typically contain a binary surfactant
25 system (anionic/nonionic) at a level of 5 to 40% by weight. A product intended for hand washing may contain a relatively high level of anionic surfactant alone (10-40%).

WO 2006/081930

PCT/EP2006/000320

- 10 -
(ii) Low or zero-P aluminosilicate-built powders
Examples of detergent compositions utilising the inorganic carrier material of the invention in an adjunct include the 5 following:
(iii) Phosphate-built powders
The modified sodium carbonate will typically be used as a 10 carrier for nonionic surfactant. An adjunct may, for example, be prepared by spraying liquid or liquefied nonionic surfactant onto a dried carrier material according to the invention, and the adjunct is then postdosed to a base powder containing anionic surfactant, possibly nonionic 15 surfactant, phosphate builder, sodium silicate and other heat-sensitive ingredients, prepared in a separate drying operation. The adjunct may, for example, contain from 5 to 40% by weight of nonionic surfactant and from 60 to 95% by weight of crystal-growth-modified inorganic salts. The 20 adjunct may, for example, constitute from 3 to 50% by weight of the final powder.
The adjunct carrier of the invention may also be used to introduce liquid ingredients other than nonionic surfactants into the composition. The anionic surfactant SLES is of 25 particular interest in that regard.
(iv) Low or zero-P aluminosilicate-built powders
The invention will now be further described with reference to the following non-limiting examples:

WO 2006/081930

PCT/EP2006/000320

- 11 -
Example 1
50 g of anhydrous sodium carbonate was dissolved in 150 ml of demineralised water into which had previously been dissolved 1 g of sodium polyaspartate (molecular weight 5 50000). The resulting solution was then dried in petri
dishes in an oven at 80°C. When dry, the solid material was removed from the dishes and lightly ground using a pestle and mortar.
The process of example 1 was repeated with other types and 10 varying amounts of sodium aspartate. The details are given in Table 1. Comparative example A contained no aspartate.
Table 1

Example No. Sodium aspartate (g) Sodium aspartate (%) Mwt of aspartate
1 1 2 50000
2 1 2 6000
3 1 2 3000
4 2.5 5 50000 ~"
5 0.5 1 50000
6 0.25 0.5 50000
7 0.125 0.25 50000
A 0 0 -

WO 2006/081930

PCT/EP2006/000320

- 12 -
Examples 8 to 14 and Comparative Example B
20 g of the dried, solid material from each of examples 1 to 7 and comparative example A was placed in a laboratory-scale granulator (Braun MR 500 CA) and granulated with coco6.5EO 5 nonionic surfactant. The weight of nonionic required to achieve granulation was noted.
For comparative Example C, 20 g of commercial grade light soda ash was used in place of the dried solid material from an earlier example. The effect of molecular weight and 10 amount of aspartate on carrying capacity is shown in tables 2 and 3.
Table 2 - Effect of Molecular Weight (at 2% polyaspartate)

Example Example forming solid material Molecular weight of poly aspartate Wt Nonionic added % Nonionic relative to dry solid material
C N/A 0 5.7 28.5
B A 0 3.3 16.5
8 1 50,000 11.9 59.5
9 2 6,000 9.7 48.5
10 3 3,000 3.1 15.5

WO 2006/081930

PCTYEP2006/000320

- 13 -
Table 3 - Effect of amount of aspartate

Example Example forming solid material % Poly aspartate Wt Nonionic added % Nonionic relative to dry solid material
C N/A 0 5.7 28.5
B A 0 3.3 16.5
8 1 2 11.9 59.5
11 4 5 11.4 57
12 5 1 11.5 57.5
13 6 0.5 8.2 41
14 7 0.25 6.8 34
Example 15 and Comparative Example D
In example D, 25 g of light soda ash was placed in a 5 laboratory-scale granulator (Braun MR 500 CA) and granulated with SLES paste (MANRO BES70).
For example 15, 25 g of the dried, solid material from example 1 was granulated with SLES paste in the same way as for example D. In each case the weight of SLES paste 10 required to achieve granulation was noted.

WO 2006/081930

PCT7EP2006/000320

- 14 -
Table 4

Example wt SLES paste added %SLES paste % relative to dry solid material
D 12.9 51.7
15 19.3 75.8
Example 16 and Comparative Example E
These examples show the benefit for carbonate/sulphate 5 mixture systems.
For example 16, 10.6 g Na2C03 was dissolved in 40 ml
demineralised water. 28.4 g Na2SC>4 was dissolved in another 160 ml demineralised water into which was also dissolved
1.6 g of a sodium polyaspartate solution (50% solids, 10 molecular weight 50,000). The two solutions were then mixed and the resultant mixture dried in petri dishes at 85°C in ■an- oven
30 g of the dried solid material was granulated with nonionic surfactant (coco 7EO) in a small granulator (Braun 15 MR500CA). The weight of nonionic required to achieve granulation was recorded as 8.4 g.
For comparative Example E, 10.6 g Na2C03 was dissolved in 40
ml demineralised water. 28.4 g Na2SC>4 was dissolved in another 160 ml demineralised water. The two solutions were

WO 2006/081930

PCT/EP2006/000320

- 15 -
then mixed and the resultant mixture dried in petri dishes at 85°C in an oven. 30 g of the dried solid material was granulated with coco 7EO nonionic surfactant in a Braun MR500CA granulator. The weight of nonionic required to 5 achieve granulation was recorded as 3.0 g.
Solid material from Example 16 clearly has higher surfactant carrying capacity than solid material from Comparative Example E.
Examples 17 and 18 and Comparative Examples F, G, H, J and C
10 To show the effect on carrying capacity of a process using a solution in preference to a slurry a series of tests were run going from dilute solution, through concentrated solution to slurry and to paste. The carrying capacity was also compared with 100% commercial grade light soda ash
15 (Comparative example C), and with sodium carbonate produced from solution in the absence of polycarboxylate polymer.
Anhydrous sodium carbonate, polycarboxylate solution (30g/l Sokolan CP5, on a dry basis), and water were mixed in the proportions listed in table 5. The resulting
.20. s.olutionsZsJLurxies./pas-tes-,w.exe^.t.h,p-n,-dried—i-n- an-,a.ven_at..
80°C.
20 g of the resulting dried, solid material from each of examples 17 and 18 and comparative examples F, G, H and J was placed in a laboratory-scale Braun MR 500 CA granulator 25 and granulated with coco6.5EO nonionic surfactant. For
comparative Example C, 20 g of commercial grade light soda ash was used.

WO 2006/081930

PCTVEP2006/000320

- 16 -
The weight of nonionic required to achieve granulation was noted for each example.
These examples clearly show that the optimum nonionic carrying capacity is obtained from drying of solutions. They also clearly show that these benefits are only obtained in the presence of a crystal habit modifying polymer. It should be noted that the water level in the solutions is in excess of 60%.
Table 5 - effect of solution concentration

Example Weight ofsodium carbonate(g) polycarboxylatesoln (ml) water (ml) appearance wt Nl/wt solid %
17 20 13.3 66.7 solution 60
18 30 20 50 solution 55.2
F 40 26.7 33.3 dilute slurry 50.9
G%_ ...... ..50,_. „33,._3 ..„.. 161 _?.,_.. ^S-i-JSEfy. . 44.7

H 60 40 0 paste 37.6
J 30 0 70 solution 16.5
C 100 0 0 light ash 28.5

WO 2006/081930

PCT7EP2006/000320

- 17 -Example 19
50 g of anhydrous sodium carbonate was dissolved in 150 ml 5 of demineralised water into which had previously been dissolved 1 g of sodium polyaspartate (molecular weight 50000). To this was added 5g of coco 6.5EO nonionic. The resulting solution was then dried in petri dishes in an oven at 80°C. When dry, the solid was removed from the dishes 10 and lightly ground using a pestle and mortar. The nominal composition of this solid material was 90.9% sodium carbonate and 9.1% nonionic.
Example 20
15
22 g of the dried, solid material from example 19 was placed
in a laboratory-scale granulator (Braun MR 500 CA) and
granulated with coco6.5EO nonionic surfactant. The weight
of additional nonionic required to achieve granulation was
20 measured as 8.1g.
The total nonionic content of the resulting granules was
_t he re fo r e_ 1_0^. 1 g_._ ..The.. weight _pf .noni onic...r.e 1 _at± ye tp__dry
sodium carbonate solid material in the granule was 50.5%.

WO 2006/081930

PCT/EP2006/000320

- 18
CLAIMS
1. A process for preparing a modified sodium carbonate
carrier material, the process comprising the steps of:
5 (i) preparing an aqueous solution of sodium carbonate;
an effective amount of a crystal growth modifier
selected from the group comprising polyacrylates,
polyaspartates and polyaspartic acids; and
optionally one or more anionic and/or nonionic
10 detergent-active compounds, one or more detergency
builders and/or one or more further heat-insensitive detergent components; whereby crystal growth-modified sodium carbonate is formed;
(ii) drying the solution to form a dry solid carrier
15 material;
(iii) optionally incorporating into the dried solid
carrier material one or more detergent components
in liquid form and/or mixing the dried solid
material with one or more solid detergent
20 components.
2. A process according to claim 1 wherein the solution is a concentrated solution with less than 35% solids.
3. A modified sodium carbonate carrier material comprising:
a) dry inorganic solids consisting of habit modified
25 sodium carbonate; and
b) polyaspartic acid, or a sodium salt of polyaspartic
acid,

WO 2006/081930

PCT/EP2006/000320

- 19
wherein the weight ratio of polyaspartic acid to the dry inorganic solids is in the ratio from 0.5:100 to 10:100.
4. A carrier material as claimed in claim 3 in which the ratio is from 1:100 to 5:100.
5 5. A carrier material as claimed in claim 3 or claim 4 in which the ratio is from 1:100 to 3:100.
6. A carrier material as claimed in any one of claims 3 to
5 in which the molecular weight of the polyaspartic acid
is greater than 4,000.
10 7. A carrier material as claimed in any one of claims 3 to
6 which is substantially free from sodium sulphate.
8. A loaded carrier comprising a carrier material as
claimed in any one of claims 3 to 7 in which there is adsorbed from 5 to 40 wt% of a liquid.
15 9. A carrier material as claimed in any one of claims 3 to
7 made according to the process of claim 1 or claim 2.
10. A loaded carrier as claimed in claim 8 in which the liauid is non-ionic surfactant or anionic surfactant paste.
20 11. Use of the loaded carrier according to claim 10 in a laundry detergent formulation.
12. Use according to claim 11 in which the laundry detergent
formulation is a powder composition.
13. Use according to claim 11 in which the laundry detergent
25 formulation is a tablet.

(S. Venkatramani) Senior Patents Manager
Dated this 2 5th day o t JUj 2007 HINDUSTAN UN.LEVER LIMITED

Documents:

1111-MUMNP-2007-CANCELLED PAGES(2-3-2009).pdf

1111-MUMNP-2007-CLAIMS(2-3-2009).pdf

1111-MUMNP-2007-CLAIMS(25-7-2007).pdf

1111-mumnp-2007-claims(granted)-(25-3-2009).pdf

1111-mumnp-2007-claims.doc

1111-mumnp-2007-claims.pdf

1111-MUMNP-2007-COPY OF EP(2-3-2009).pdf

1111-MUMNP-2007-CORRESPONDENCE 1(15-5-2008).pdf

1111-MUMNP-2007-CORRESPONDENCE(2-3-2009).pdf

1111-MUMNP-2007-CORRESPONDENCE(30-11-2007).pdf

1111-MUMNP-2007-CORRESPONDENCE(8-2-2012).pdf

1111-MUMNP-2007-CORRESPONDENCE(IPO)-(30-3-2009).pdf

1111-mumnp-2007-description (complete).pdf

1111-MUMNP-2007-DESCRIPTION(COMPLETE)-(2-3-2009).pdf

1111-MUMNP-2007-DESCRIPTION(COMPLETE)-(25-7-2007).pdf

1111-mumnp-2007-description(granted)-(25-3-2009).pdf

1111-MUMNP-2007-FORM 1(25-7-2007).pdf

1111-MUMNP-2007-FORM 18(30-11-2007).pdf

1111-mumnp-2007-form 2(2-3-2009).pdf

1111-MUMNP-2007-FORM 2(COMPLETE)-(25-7-2007).pdf

1111-mumnp-2007-form 2(granted)-(25-3-2009).pdf

1111-MUMNP-2007-FORM 2(TITLE PAGE)-(2-3-2009).pdf

1111-MUMNP-2007-FORM 2(TITLE PAGE)-(25-7-2007).pdf

1111-mumnp-2007-form 2(title page)-(granted)-(25-3-2009).pdf

1111-MUMNP-2007-FORM 3(2-3-2009).pdf

1111-MUMNP-2007-FORM 3(25-7-2007).pdf

1111-MUMNP-2007-FORM 5(2-3-2009).pdf

1111-MUMNP-2007-FORM 5(25-7-2007).pdf

1111-mumnp-2007-form-1.pdf

1111-mumnp-2007-form-2.doc

1111-mumnp-2007-form-2.pdf

1111-mumnp-2007-form-3.pdf

1111-mumnp-2007-form-5.pdf

1111-mumnp-2007-form-pct-ib-311.pdf

1111-mumnp-2007-form-pct-isa-237.pdf

1111-mumnp-2007-form-pct-separate sheet-237.pdf

1111-MUMNP-2007-GENERAL POWER OF ATTORNEY(25-7-2007).pdf

1111-mumnp-2007-pct-correspondence-0thers.pdf

1111-mumnp-2007-pct-correspondence-received.pdf

1111-mumnp-2007-pct-search report.pdf

1111-MUMNP-2007-SPECIFICATION(AMENDED)-(2-3-2009).pdf

1111-MUMNP-2007-WO INTERNATIONAL PUBLICATION REPORT(25-7-2007).pdf


Patent Number 233048
Indian Patent Application Number 1111/MUMNP/2007
PG Journal Number 14/2009
Publication Date 03-Apr-2009
Grant Date 25-Mar-2009
Date of Filing 25-Jul-2007
Name of Patentee HINDUSTAN UNILEVER LIMITED
Applicant Address HINDUSTAN LEVER HOUSE, 165-166 BACKBAY RECLAMATION, MUMBAI-400 020,
Inventors:
# Inventor's Name Inventor's Address
1 CHAPPLE ANDREW PAUL UNILEVER R&D PORT SUNLIGHT, QUARRY ROAD EAST, BEBINGTON,WIRRAL, MERSEYSIDE CH63 3JW
2 CRAWFORD ROBERT JOHN UNILVER R&D PORT SUNLIGHT, QUARRY ROAD EAST, BEBINGTON,WIRRAL, MERSEYSIDE, CH63 3JW
PCT International Classification Number C11D3/10 C11D3/37
PCT International Application Number PCT/EP2006/000320
PCT International Filing date 2006-01-13
PCT Conventions:
# PCT Application Number Date of Convention Priority Country
1 0502056.5 2005-02-01 U.K.