Title of Invention

INTERNET CAFE CONNECTED EMAIL INFORMING SYSTEM

Abstract An electronic mail informing system (email informer) notifies a recipient of the presence of electronic mail on a remote electronic mail server by means of an electronic gadget connected to the recipient's telephone line. The present invention uses an existing server of the Internet Cafe by installing it with the email informer software package consisting of database enrolling, remote email server querying, Dial & Discotmect Protocol (DDP) initiating modules. The database module records the telephone number vis-a-vis email ID of the users. Dual Mail Messaging (DMM) technique is adopted for sending emails to the user in which two mails of an email are sent, first email an original to user's account and the second email (with least information) to the email informer's account. DMM has the advantage of email privacy, password protection and efficient architecture for querying new emails. The querying module continuously scans the email informer account for new emails, wherein a new email found, the corresponding telephone number is extracted from the database and the email informer gadget is alerted by employing the DD protocol which has an advantage of being simple, reliable and economical. Therefore email informer gadget doesn't use any sophisticated Microprocessor or Memory to analyze the DD Protocol signals, hence gadgets are economically viable at an affordable price.
Full Text BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
1. Field of the Invention
The present invention relates to electronic mail notification system, particularly of the type which notify over telephone a recipient of the presence of electronic mail on a remote electronic mail server.
2. Description of Related Art.
The Internet has evolved into an important medium for communications between individuals and organizations throughout the world. As an enterprise solution for many organizations, electronic mail (email) has become a very important part of the entire Internet community, in that it allows individuals and organizations to exchange ideas, information, and even full documents and applications inexpensively and easily. The Internet Service Provider ("ISP") provides the connection to the Internet.
Email addressed to a particular user is sent to and stored on a remote email server. The user must query the email server in order to determine whether new email has been received. Querying the email server for viewing the email requires an online connection between the user's computer and the remote server. However, in order for user to achieve prompt and effective delivery of email received from other user, the user must continuously logon to the ISP and frequently query the email server. This would result in a huge bill from the Electricity department for utilizing power to run the user's computer, a huge bill form ISP for utilizing the Internet hours and ofcourse a huge bill from the Telecom for utilizing the telephone line.
In past several systems have been developed to alert users of email received and stored on the user's email server without requiring a continuous online connection to the Internet.
An attempt for solving this problem has been provided by Woltz, et al, In U.S. Patent No. 6,216,165 entitled "E-MAIL PAGING SYSTEM AND METHOD", in
which a conventional broadcast pager networks are employed to deliver a paging signal to a user's pager. This system, however, requires the user to purchase a paging device & its services and should be in close proximity to the user. The other problems associated with this invention are that long messages exceeding the page length limit will be truncated. Furthermore, pages cannot include email attachments.
Another prior attempt at solving this problem has been provided by Quinn, in U.S. Patent 5,944,786 entitled "AUTOMATIC NOTIFICATION OF RECEIPT OF ELECTRONIC MAIL (E-MAIL) VIA TELEPHONE SYSTEM WITHOUT REQUIRING LOG-ON TO EMAIL SERVER". The automatic email notification system provides for the automatic notification of an email recipient of the presence of email in the recipient's email box on a remote email server. The automatic email notification system comprises an email server connected through a computer network to one or more computer system for receiving email from the computer systems. The email server is also connected through the computer network to a mail notification server and a notification device at a recipient's

location. The notification device sends a data signal containing a message received signal or message retrieved signal to the mail notification server. The mail notification server in turn generates a notification signal which is sent using the subscriber's phone number to the subscriber's telephone node thereby activating or deactivating the notification device in response to a respective one of the message received or message retrieved signals. The mail notification server may be included as part of a telephone system voice messaging system. In this case the mail notification server controls the voice messaging system which generates and sends the notification signal.
A recent attempt for solving this problem has been provided by Duphorne, in U.S. Patent 6,212,265 entitled "METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR ELECTRONIC MAIL NOTIFICATION" in which existing wire-line public switched telephone networks and Caller Identification ("CallerlD") system operated by local telephone companies are utilized to deliver email notification to users via the user's telephone lines. The invention queries the user's ISP remote server to determine whether any email addressed to the user is received by and/or stored thereon and, if so, causes an associated CallerlD server of, for instance, the local telephone company to send an email notification signal in a format compatible with operating CallerlD protocols to an email notification device using a public switched telephone network. By transmitting email notification signals over existing telephone lines, the present invention is widely available to users and advantageously eliminates the need for the user to maintain a paging or cable service and, perhaps more importantly, does not require the user to maintain an online cable connection, an online Internet connection, or a paging device. In some embodiment, email notification signals in accordance with the present invention are transmitted during telephone ringing intervals and, in other embodiments, are transmitted prior to the first telephone ringing signal. In one embodiment, an email notification signal containing at least a portion of the text of unread email received by and/or stored on the user ISP email server is transmitted to the user via the public switched telephone network.
It may be noted from the above that most inventions require dedicated servers perhaps with different names say the CallerlD server, the Voice Mail Messaging Server and an Email Notification Server. These Servers with high-end configuration - powerful processor, huge memory and gigantic hard disk space -still find difficulty in managing the growth of the Internet population. Moreover, these servers require heavy investment for their implementation. Therefore, it appears from the business point of view that only the big corporations can realize these inventions provided they are convinced about the returns in terms of profits for their investment.
One more reason is that the basic technologies on which these inventions work are not yet fully implemented due to some technical constraints. Therefore these inventions have limited usage. For example the CallerlD service is not available with all telephone exchanges because of which CallerlD based email notification systems cannot work at these exchanges.

Another, disadvantage of the prior inventions is that they use unreliable software architecture for querying the email server. The problems noted with this architecture are:
- Disclosing the Password &
- Load on the Server.
In order for the query software to look into the account of the user, the software needs the password of the user's email account. Unfortunately, it is observed that many users are reluctant to give away their password to a third party, because the secrecy of the emails will be lost.
Today, we have many email service providers in the world. Most of them even provide FREE email service giving as much space as 10MB on their servers. Therefore, users open their email account with their favorite email service providers after assessing their facilities and advantages. Therefore, when a user enrolls with the email notification system of any of the prior inventions, the query software gets logged onto the email server at an interval of time depending on the frequency settings. If there are many users, and most of them have chosen a high frequency (as anybody would like to be informed at the earliest) then, the query software has to be logged onto to multiple email servers at a time, which means, too much load on the server, how powerful the server might be.
In most of the prior inventions where the notification of the receipt of email is done via a telephone line uses a gadget also called email notification device which is installed at the user's place. These devices are built around sophisticated electronics using memory and microprocessor. The communication protocols of these inventions are very complex in nature that only a microprocessor can analyze these protocol signals. Therefore the email notification device of the prior inventions are relatively expensive.
It is observed that users still find an ordinary personal computer with standard keyboard, a mouse and especially a 14"/15" color monitor attractive to surf the internet. Today, not only web sites but also emails are appearing over beautiful backgrounds. They also come with several attachments generally running into long pages of text, photo images and movie clippings.
It doesn't make much difference if email notification device displays a part or complete contents of the user's email on its small LCD display or the same is heard (text to sound) through a speaker.
Therefore, from the users point of view what is presently required in the form of an invention, is that a simple notification that instantly alerts the user that the user has received a new email in his account. The email notification device should be economically available at an affordable price without any subscription fee or bill for each notification.
Similarly, from the business point of view what is presently required in the form of an invention is that to find a solution to the cost and maintenance of the email notification server that has hindered the implementation of the prior inventions.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
Accordingly, it is an object of the present invention to provide an electronic mail notification system that notifies a recipient of the presence of electronic mail on a remote electronic mail server by avoiding the disadvantages of the prior art.
A feature of the present invention is that rather than using a single, powerful, dedicated and expensive email notification server installed at a central location trying to administer the ever-growing Internet users, the invention adopts the methodology of the parallel processing of splitting a big job into small tasks and then executing. Similarly, the job of a single super server is split among several ordinary computers and the big user population is divided into small groups, wherein an ordinary computer can tackle a group, easily! Now, the issue was the appropriate location of these computers and their maintenance. Fortunately, the invention found the best solution to this problem - Internet Cafe.
Over the past few years Internet cafe have increased in number. It is estimated that, in cities of developing nations, for every 200 Homes one will find an Internet Cafe. It is also estimate that Internet Cafe still grow like Telephone booths that appear every corner of the street. The main reason might be that people in developing nations would like to share the resources so that it becomes economical for them. For instance, an occasional Internet browser would not be willing to purchase a computer with Internet connection for himself but rather he would like to become a member of the Cafe and browse there. Not to mention the mere reason that all homes in developing nations still do not have a computer facility. Even the frequent users of the Internet who own a computer with internet connection finds browsing at Internet cafe more advantageous, for the following reasons:
- High speed dedicated leased lines are available with internet cafe that makes Internet surfing faster in comparison to the normal telephone lines.
- Telephone line will not be blocked during the surfing time, therefore urgent communication over the telephone can be conveyed on time.
- Computers at the Internet Caf6 are maintained by system administrators and hardware engineers.
- Comfortable infrastructure with adequate space for each browser makes surfing enjoyable.
- Experienced staffs possessing knowledge of Internet are available for assistance.
- Above all, since it is a community service where several users would be sharing the Internet at a time the user would find the service economical.

Another feature of the present invention is the use of Dual Mail Messaging (DMM) technique created specifically to find the solution to the problem of password leaking and query of multiple email servers. In this technique when a sender sends an email to the user's email account, two emails are actually sent. One directly to the designated user's email account and another one, a modified email with minimum information (such as To: From: Subject: without actual contents) to the email informer's account.
Therefore query software need not log onto multiple email servers at a time, rather it simply has to scan the email informer's account for arrival of any new incoming mails. Moreover the query software that is scanning email informer's account doesn't require the password of the user. Since the actual contents are not available with the modified email, there is no chance of privacy being lost.
DMM technique also ensures that the user is not informed of arrival of bulk mail or junk mail. The user is informed of only mail from designated senders who send the second mail to the email informer account.
It may be noted that email informer's account, like any other email account, is reserved by the email informer system on any existing email server. Every Internet Cafe where email informer system is installed has its own unique email informer account. For example if ei912@usa.net is the email ID of the email informer account at Internet Cafe -I then ei100@hotmail.com can be the email ID for email informer account at Internet Cafe - II, so on. Generally the system Administrators create the email informer account for his Internet Cafe.
Yet another feature of the present invention is that the email informer communication protocol i.e., the server at Internet Cafe to the email informer gadget is very simple, reliable and economical. The protocol called Dial & Disconnect Protocol (DDP) does not keep unnecessary overheads such as transmitting of data such as alphanumeric text.
Still another feature of the present invention and its protocol (DDP) is that there will be no charge from the Telecom service either to the Internet Cafe or to the user for utilizing the services of the telecom at the time of email notification.
Yet still another feature of the present invention is that the email informer gadget doesn't use any sophisticated Microprocessor or Memory because the DD Protocol signals can be analyzed even by a simple circuitry also. The email informer gadget is economically available at an affordable price.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWING
These and other objects and advantages of the invention will become more apparent and more readily appreciated from the following detailed description of the presently preferred exemplary embodiment of the invention taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, of which:
FIG. 1 shows the setup of an email informer system at an Internet Cafe in accordance with the present Invention.
FIG. 2 shows the Dual Mail Messaging (DMM) technique of sending an original email to the user's email account at first email server and a modified email of the same (with least information) to the email informer's account at the second email server.
FIG. 3 shows an email informer gadget connected to the telephone via a telephone line in series in accordance with the present Invention.
FIG. 4 is a front close up view of an email informer.
FIG. 5 is a portion of the telephone ringing signal.
FIG. 6 is a waveform of a telephone ringing signal over a period of time.
FIG. 7 a new and a unique waveform is generated as a result of Dial & Disconnect Protocol (DDP).
FIG. 8 timing diagram showing logic levels at several points in the circuit.
FIG. 9 the communication protocol DDP generation code with standard settings is Illustrated.
FIG. 10 is the flowchart of the email informer database software for enrolling new users for the email informer service. This software is installed onto the server of the Internet Cafe.
FIG. 11 is the flowchart of the email informer querying software that continuously scans for incoming new mails in the inbox of email informer's account. This software is installed onto the server of the Internet Cafe.
FIG. 12 the block diagram showing the incoming telephone line pair connecting the telephone instrument via the "Reed Relay".
FIG. 13 the schematic diagram of the main circuit that analyzes ringing signals.
FIG. 14 the schematic diagram of the counter display circuit - a visual indicator.

LIST OF REFERENCE NUMERALS UTILIZED IN THE DRAWING
10 - a border that indicated inside an Internet Cafe
11 - the monitor of the Internet Cafe's Server
12 - the main Server of the Internet Cafe
13 - all relevant software, such as, web browser including the email
Informer database enrolling and querying software are installed onto this server
14 - the modem for the leased line
15 - the modem for ordinary telephone line
16 - the leased line for Internet connection
17 - the telephone line for dialing & communication with the email
informer gadget
18 - Ethernet/LAN cable to connect third Client Computer
19 - Ethernet/LAN cable to connect second Client Computer
20 - Ethernet/LAN cable to connect first Client Computer
21 - the telephone exchange
22 - a dedicate line to Internet backbone
23 - a telephone line connected to a residence house
24 - the Internet backbone
25 - a residential house
26 - a CPU of the first Client Computer
27 - a monitor of the first Client Computer
28 - a CPU of the second Client Computer
29 - a monitor of the second Client Computer
30 - a CPU of the third Client Computer
31 - a monitor of the third Client Computer
32 - a monitor of the Computer sending emails
33 - a CPU of the Computer sending emails
34 - the Internet Software and the software to send emails are
installed on this computer
35 - a remote email Server that has user's email account
36 - a remote email Server that has email informer's account

37 - a line connecting to Internet backbone
38 - a line connecting remote email Server-1 & the Internet backbone
39 - a line connecting remote email Server-2 & the Internet backbone
40 - an email informer gadget
41 - the plug-in socket to connect cable from telephone line
42 - the plug-in socket to connect cable from email informer
gadget to the Telephone Instrument
43 - a cable from the telephone line
44 - a cable that goes to Telephone Instrument from the gadget
45 - a Telephone Instrument
46 - the telephone receiver
47 - buttons to disconnect a telephonic conversation
48 - a battery to power an email informer gadget
49 - a battery box built into the gadget
50 - a reset button
51 - a plastic casing for the email informer circuit
52 - a flat LED panel with the inscription "You Got a Mail!"
53 - an option -1 means only visual indication
54 - an option - 2 means only sound play
55 - an option - 3 means both sound & visual indications
56 - an LED Numerical Indicator that increments when new mails arrive in the
inbox of the user, until reset button is pressed
57 - a selector knob
58 - a speaker
59 - the minimum time of the no voltage pulse of a ringing signal
60 - the time of the peak pulse of a ringing signal
61 - the maximum time of the no voltage pulse of a ringing signal
62 - a period of time the ringing signal is seen between start & break
63 - a period of time the ringing signal is seen between start & break for 1®' DDP
64 - a gap time between two DD ringing signals
65 - a period of time the ringing signal is seen between start & break for 2"' DDP

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT
Embodiment of the present invention are discussed below in the context of the Internet Cafe also popularly know as Cyber Cafe and its members or customers or users who have the regular telephone facility at their homes for simplicity only. It is to be understood that embodiment of the present invention are equally applicable to an Office or an Organizations and its employees and several such other possibilities. Accordingly, the present invention is not to be constructed as limited to specific examples described herein but rather includes within scopes all embodiments defined by the appended claims.
Referring to FIG.1 shows the setup of the Internet Cafe 10 and the changes that have been made so that email informer becomes operational in accordance with the present invention. The Internet Cafe has a Server Computer 12 and the cluster of Client Computers 26 connected by the Networking line 18, which can be either be a LAN or through Ethernet cables. System administrators, hardware engineers and several staff to assist their customers manage the Internet Cafe 10, which is generally owned by private entrepreneurs. As usual the clients 26 and server 12 in these Cafes includes a central processing unit ("CPU") such as, for instance, a microprocessor and is coupled to the Internet Service Provider (ISP) through a leased line via a modem 14. The leased line 16 and modem 14 are well known in the art and are therefore not discussed in detailed herein. Appropriate Internet browsing 13 and related software is also installed in these computers. The Internet Caf6 can be connected to any email server 35 via Internet 24 as provided by the ISP. In most cases FREE email service with 10MB space on these servers is common these days. The ISP email server is preferably a well-known POPS email server 36. The Email Informer querying software 13 is installed on the Server computer 12 of the Cafe 10. The Server is in turn coupled to the user email informer gadget 40 an email notification device via an ordinary telephone line 23, which ofcourse requires another modem 15 for the purpose. The communication between the email informer gadget and the server is established by a unique telephonic code named as Dial & Disconnect Protocol or simply DDP 63, 64.
The DD protocols FIG.9 is most simple, economical and reliable means specifically intended for communication between the PC 12 at the Internet Cafe 10 and the email informer gadget 40 connected to the telephone line 43. The greatest advantage of this protocol is that Telecom will not charge any bill for this communication. In this protocol 63, 64, the calling party makes successive dialing & disconnection and eventually disconnecting the called party's telephone before the hand set is lifted. Although, transmitting of data such as voice, alphanumeric text is not possible through this protocol but the email informer gadget can identify the ring signal followed by the break in the signal as that originating/emanating from the email informer system and it switches on accordingly.
FIG. 2 illustrates the Dual Mail Messaging (DMM) technique adopted to send messages in this invention. When a sender wishes the user to be satisfied of the email via the email informer, the sender has to send two emails, these are received by two email servers and then gets stored on their respective memory spaces. In preferred embodiment the FREE email space is reserved by the user

on the first server 35 and similarly another FREE ennail space is reserved by the email informer itself on the second email server 36. That means, both the "user" and the "email informer" have two different email accounts provided by the two independent email service providers. In some embodiments these two email accounts can be on the same server also. Out of two emails, the email that goes to the user's server 35 is the original one without any modifications while email informer's account 36 receives the email with preliminary information such as To: From: and the Subject: without the actual contents of the email. The advantages of the Dual Mail Messaging technique will be apparent in the later part of the discussion. In preferred embodiment, email informer's query software 13 operating on the server 12 of the Internet cafe 10 continuously scans the email informer account via the Internet 24 to determine whether any new emails have arrived in its inbox. Once the scanning software finds a new email it extracts the telephone number corresponding to the email ID to which its original copy was sent from the database and alerts the email informer gadget 40 connected to the telephone 45 by means of DD Protocol 63, 64.
The email informer has a database that is stored on the memory space (Hard Disk) of the server 12 at the Internet Cafe 10. The database contains several records containing the information specific to the customers who have enrolled for email informer service. In particular to this embodiment the database enrolling software that allows the customers to type in the required information is also installed on the server of the Internet cafe. The database software takes inputs from the customer such as email ID and Telephone number. There is also the optional information like users name and postal address. Since, the querying software continuously scans the email informer's account there is no need for input like the frequency with which the user's email server is queried. Also, filtering details that make email informer not to respond to particular usernames is also not required. The simple reason is that the user will give email informer's email ID along with his email ID to only those people whom the user thinks as important or to be notified.
For example, FIG. 10 shows the flow chart that illustrates the required inputs for the email informer database, which corresponds to the user as used in one embodiment of the present invention. The Email ID field stores the email ID of the user enrolling for the email information facility, e.g. sony@hotmail.com and the Telephone Number field stores the users Telephone Number (Local only), e.g. "3710683". The STD and International call code should not be prefixed to this number, e.g. "+91-40-3710683", because it is assumed that Internet Cafe 10 and its customers fall within the local call in accordance with the present invention. There is no field for Password i.e., user need not type in the password of his/her email ID. By not disclosing the password information to the third party one would be ensuring ultimate security of his/her email account and can be confident about the secrecy of his/her email contents. In past there have been reports of loss of critical information by means of theft of password for being negligent by giving passwords to third parties. It is supposed that password is that authentication text that should be known only to the user and the very meaning of the password is lost by making it open. This is the greatest advantage of Dual Mail Messaging (DMM) technique created for the purpose of email informer. The optional entries

that are illustrated in the flowchart are the user's name e.g. T. Sony Roy and user's postal e.g. C-96, S.R.Nagar, Hyderabad 500 038, INDIA. In other embodiments additional fields may be added as desired.
FIG. 11 illustrates the flow chart of the email informer query software that scans the new incoming mails of the user in the email informer's account in accordance with the preferred embodiment. The system administrator generally maintains the email informer software that is installed onto the server 12 of the Internet Cafe 10. The Post Office Protocol or POPS (RFC 1725), allows the Internet Cafe's Server to query the mailbox of email Server for new mails that was previously delivered by Simple Mail Transfer Protocol (SMTP). In the following lines the basic operation of the POP protocol is explained. For the sake of simplicity the Internet Caf§ Server and email informer query software are called mail client and client application respectively.
A POPS server host providing mail services to mail client begins its functionality by listening for connection from remote mail client application on TCP port 110. When user wants to request email from their mailboxes, their email client application establishes a TCP connection with the server host to port 110. Once a connection is established between the client application and the POPS server, the server sends a short greeting to email client. The client and POPS server then begins to exchange commands and response to download the email located in the mailbox on the POPS server for the respective user.
From connection establishment to connection termination, a POPS session progresses through various states to accomplish the task of transferring email to a requesting client. Once the TCP connection has been opened and the POPS server has sent the greeting, the session enters the "AUTHORIZATION" state. In this state, the client must identify itself to the POPS server. Once the client has successfully done this, the server acquires resources associated with the client's mailbox, and the session enters the "TRANSACTION" state. In this state, the client requests actions on the part of the POPS server. When the client has issued the "QUIT" command, the session enters the "UPDATE" state. In this state, the POPS server releases any resources acquired during the "TRANSACTION" state and terminate the connection at TCP port.
In accordance with the embodiment of the present the email informer querying software checks for new emails in the Inbox of the email informer's account iteratively. If the software finds a new email then it gets the corresponding Telephone number based on the email ID. Then communicates with email informer gadget using DD Protocol, 6S, 64. If message is conveyed successfully then that email is removed form the email informer email account by permanently deleting that email or moving the email to a new folder. For some reasons if communication couldn't be established such as user's telephone line is "BUSY", then the software puts the email in a queue for communicating with the gadget, later! Once the task is accomplished the emails no longer reside in the email informers account, the email informer account can accommodate as many new mails as possible. Moreover, each email simply has the To: From: & Subject: information therefore the memory space required is also relatively less. The query

software also has error detection feature that ensures that software works smoothly when any problem occurs.
In accordance with the embodiment of the present invention on arrival of a new email in the email informer's account the Telephone number is extracted from the database based on the email ID to whom the mail was originally sent and then the DD Protocol 63, 64 is initiated between the Internet Cafe server 12 and the email informer's gadget 40 connected to the Telephone 45 in series.
In FIG.9 illustrates the email informer software when communicating with the email informer's gadget 40 uses the DD protocol 63, 64, via a telephone line 23 using a modem 15. Although, modem has many applications including sending and receiving data (data, fax and voice), it is however utilized only for automatic dialing by the software in accordance with the embodiment of the present invention. Consider the following string:
ATDT3710683; vbCr
AT is the Hayes compatible ATTENTION command and is required to send commands to the modem. DT means "Dial Tone." The Dial command uses touch tones, as opposed to pulse Dial Pulse or In short DP. A semicolon tells the modem to return to command mode after dialing, which is an important requirement. A carriage return, vbCr, is required when sending commands to the modem.
After setting the communication port and opening it the Telephone number is dialed. Wait for "OK" string to come back from the modem. If there is data in the buffer and read, if it turns out to be "OK" then one can assume that other phone must be ringing or making a ringer signal. On the other hand if the data string is "BUSY" the Telephone is engaged. When the dialing task is over, modem needs to be disconnected and its port needs to be closed.
In accordance with the present invention the following few lines explain how the DD signal is generated by using DD protocol 63, 64. The email informer gadget when analyzes these signals senses whether the email informer software is trying to communicate with the gadget or simply it is any ordinary telephone call. As a first rule of DD Protocol 63, 64 is to dial the user's telephone number and if the telephone is successfully dialed then wait for appropriate time until few rings are generated. It is important to note that period of ringing time should not exceed the limits of the parameter settings. After the some gap, another such ring should be generated. This process should be repeated depending on the accuracy settings required by the user. More such rings ensure greater accuracy of the DD protocol 63, 64 but compromising with the time. The standard settings are two Dial & Disconnect rings where each ring will last not more than 5 seconds. There is a chance that, after first DD ring an ordinary telephone call may intercept DD communication. In such a situation the sequence of DD protocol 63, 64 is repeated again from the first DD ring. Dial tone or high speed dialing is employed for the purpose rather than pulse tone which is relatively slow at dialing telephone numbers.

The ringing signal is produced at the Telephone Exchange and is composed of a 80 Volt /133 Hertz signal which is impressed across the telephone line. A close up view of the ringing signal is shown in FIG. 5. The signal pattern will be different in comparison to Local, STD and International calls. For simplicity the invention assumes that the user and the cyber cafe fall within a Local calling area. FIG. 6 shows a ringing signal of a standard Local call over a period of time T, 62. One may notice a series of 133 Hertz - Pulses and 80 Volt - Plains in the ringing signal. Also, the time of the plains vary cyclically - small plain followed by large plain and so on. Let R, 60 be the time of the Ring, Ta, 59 be the time for the small plain and Ifi, 61 the time for the large plain. For duration of 4 to 5 seconds approximately 4 Rings are generated.
In FIG. 7 of preferred embodiments, the email informer software installed at the Internet Cafe's server generates such ringing signal ( = 4R) 63 for a period of approximately 5 seconds. That means if one were to bypass the email informer gadget 40 and hear the ringing signal directly through telephone one would notice that after 4 rings the ringing signal would stop. Depending on the accuracy settings selected by the user as mention in the embodiment earlier one might hear such short period ringing signals again and again with appropriate gaps { = 76) 64. As explained above the DD protocol is independent of Telephone Exchange. That means, there is no need for addition or modification in the infrastructure of the Telephone Exchange nor there is any need to send any "test tone" signals from the Telephone Exchange to trigger the gadget.
In accordance with the embodiment of the present invention as the email informer gadget 40 is connected to the telephone line in series, the ringing signals are not heard through the telephone instrument 45 until the gadget has analyzed them and found them to be the signals of an ordinary call. This ensures that the user will not lift the telephone receiver, unnecessarily. Moreover during the course of DD protocol communication even if the user accidentally lifts the receiver, the gadget will not allow the connection with the telephone line until the protocol is completed. This is an advantage of the gadget.
In FIG. 4 the email informer gadget 40 is made with a Plastic or a Metallic container whose dimensions can vary depending on the design model, however it is roughly around 6 in x 4 in x 2 in (= Length x Breath x Height).The email informer gadget 40 has two telephone plug-in sockets on either sides of the container. The cable from the telephone line is inserted into left-side socket 41 while the cable from the right-side socket 42 goes to the telephone instrument as shown in FIG. 3.
The close view of the email informer gadget as shown in FIG. 4, consists of the following main parts; Speaker 58, Flat LED Display 52, LED Numbers 56, Selecting Knob 57, Battery Box 49, Reset Button 50 and ofcourse two plug-in sockets as described above. Through the speaker one can hear the sound "You got an email". In a preferred embodiment the speaker plays the sound "You got an email, please check your account, Thank you". The sound comes when the chip inside the email informer gadget is activated. The text sound is prerecorded onto the chip of the gadget at the time of its manufacturing. Alternatively a low cost

musical Buzzer replaces the speaker & Its related prerecord message playing chip for economical design. There is also a visual indication, when new mails arrive in the user's Inbox, by means of an LED display 52. The email informer gadget uses a flat LED on which the text "You Got an Email!" is inscribed, in such a way that when this LED is switched on there will be a clear bright display alerting the user. Alternatively a low cost single LED is used for the same purpose for economical design.
The Selecting Knob can be pointed at either number "1", "2" or "3". When "1" 53 is selected the user will be alerted by sound, when "2" 54 is selected the user will be alerted by the visual indication and when "3" 55 is selected the user will be alerted by both sound and visual indications, when new mail arrives in his Inbox. It is suggested that when the user is at home he can select the modes either "1" or "3". But, when he is out of his residence it is preferable to select the mode "2", so that continuous play of the sound "You got an Email" doesn't disturb his/her neighbors. Alternatively the Buzzer will play the music for some time, say Va minute and then it will stop automatically or immediately by pressing the reset button. In this design model the Selecting Knob switch will not be necessary.
LED Numbers 56 display the email count. This counter keeps on incrementing whenever new mails come to the user's account. By pressing the Reset button 50 the user will be switching OFF the sound play (if it is playing as described above), the LED visual indicator and finally the email counter is initialized to zero (00). The email informer gadget draws power supply from the battery 48 for which a battery box 49 is built into the gadget. In some embodiment the email informer gadget can utilize power supply form mains through an external eliminator.
In FIG. 4 the email informer gadget 40 consists of an electronic circuit (PCB i.e. Printed Circuit Board) housed inside its container. The email informer circuit does not use a Microprocessor or Microcontroller rather it is built around familiar Integrated Circuits. There are two reasons: (1). The DD protocol is simple so it doesn't required sophisticated electronics for its analysis and (2). Economical considerations - email informer circuit was constructed within 1/2 (half) the cost of what might have been with a Microprocessor or Microcontroller design. That means the gadget can be manufactured at a low cost.
The circuit of the email informer gadget does several functions including its main function of examining the ringing signals and allowing the normal telephone call to pass unmodified to the telephone device and so on. We will now explain how the circuit of the gadget actually works with the help of figures 12, 13 & 14. FIG. 12 shows the hookswitch module that simulates the on-hook and off-hook states of the telephone instrument. The module consists of a Reed Relay L1, which operates on 5V / DC, and a Resistor RL. FIG. 13 is the schematic diagram of the actual circuit that analyzes the protocol and FIG. 14 depicts the schematic of the counter circuit that forms part of the visual indicator of the gadget.

The circuit can be superlatively explained by grouping the parts as modules. In all there are 11 modules for figures 12, 13 & 14 and they are called Hookswitch, Regufator, Digitization, Ring-ON, Ring-Time-Detection, Channeiing, Latchiing, Logic, Increment-Reset, Buzzer-ON (optional) and Counter-Display.
Names of these modules best match their functionality.
The incoming telephone line pair is terminated into the hookswitch module at Junctions J1 and J2. The telephone Instrument cable that too has a pair of wires is terminated into the same module at Junctions J1t and J2t. While the Junction J1 and J1t are linked by a conducting cable the line from J2 is routed via the Reed Relay L1 to Junction J2t.
Normally when the telephone is not in use (on the hook) the relay L1 is in contact or closed state and carries a voltage of 48 ~ 50 DC. This power is provided by the Telephone Exchange to operate the telephone system. At this state the telephone stands ready for an incoming telephone ringing signal or call.
The ringing signal is produced at the Telephone Exchange and is composed of an 80 V AC modulated pulses at 133 Hertz signal which is impressed across the telephone line. This signal is produced by rotary generators called ringing machines or by solid-state circuits which utilizes no moving parts. The ringer circuit inside the telephone instrument resonates at sufficiently audible frequencies of 133 Hertz.
However the hookswitch module opens the Reed Relay L1 when the first ring appears and closes only after a time period of 5 seconds. Therefore one will not hear the first 4 rings. If a callerlD device is connected to the telephone line or the telephone instrument itself has a built in callerlD feature then the callerlD protocol allowing the transmission of alphanumeric data which is superimposed during the silent interval between successive ringing intervals of the user's telephone is lost during the first 4 rings. To overcome this problem a resistor RL is connected across J2 to J2t that allows the callerlD protocol to be transmitted without audible ringing signals.
During the first 4 rings if the user accidentally lifts the telephone receiver the instrument will not get on the hook with the Telephone Exchange. This is because; the telephone system has been designed so that it presents an impedance of about 1000 ohms between the DC source voltage at the Telephone Exchange and the user's telephone instrument. When the telephone handset is lifted, the low impedance of the telephone instrument causes the voltage across the line to drop to about 6 volts. However when the first 4 rings are being received, due to Reed Relay in open state the resistor RL cannot allow sufficient DC current to be drawn by the telephone instrument to signal the Telephone Exchange that a call is to be initiated. This prevents the telephone switching circuits to give a dial tone to the line and wait for the user's dialing operation. The user would not be able to make the call until the email informer DDP operation is completed.

FIG. 13 shows the schematic diagram of the intelligent circuit used to analyze the DD protocol. The Junctions J1, J2 and J5 shown in figures 12 and 13 are interlinked. In fact the Reed Relay L1 is operated by the intelligent circuit by applying 5 Volts DC at the Junction J5.
The telephone ringing signal need to be digitized before they are analyzed by the circuit. This process is carried out by the digitization module.
A familiar "signal" sensing circuitry consisting of two transistors Q1 (n-p-n) & Q2 (p-n-p), two high ohm resistors R1 and R2, where R1 >R2 are employed here. For the transistor Q1 the collector is grounded, the base is connected to the junction point of two resistors R1 & R2 and its emitter is coupled to the base of the transistor Q2. The other end of the resistor R1 is grounded and the resistor R2 is connected to the Junction J1. These resistors play an important role in biasing the transistors Q1 & Q2. The emitter of the transistor Q2 drives the test lamp LED - D1. This NPN - PNP transistors coupled circuit is powered by 5 V / DC which is fed to the collector of the transistor Q2. When Junction J1 is grounded the Junction J2 acts as a sensing probe wherein a signal is applied, the test lamp glows. Similarly when the telephone line's negative terminal is connected to Junction J1 and positive terminal is connected to Junction J2 the test lamp glows when there is a ring and doesn't glow during silence.
It is of interest to note that it is the same circuit used in the household "Line Testers" to check for the presence of 230 Volts AC current. Since the circuitry has it own power supply (5V / DC) and it simply senses the signals virtually no current is drawn from the telephone line. This is an important feature of the invention because as per the Telecommunication Engineering Centre, Interface requirements for attachments to the telephones (IR No. IR / ATC - 01/02. June 2001), the idle current drawn by the attachment shall be limited to 80 pA. Otherwise the Telephone Exchange can determine if any equipment is connected across the line by simply measuring the impedance of the line. As a matter of fact, some Telephone Exchanges have an automatic computerized system which checks all lines on a daily basis, and alerts Telephone Exchange officials if there is a change in the status of any line.
The emitter Q2 Is connected to the base of the transistor Q3 through a reslster R3. The collector of the transistor Q3 is grounded and its emitter transforms an analog ringing signal, see FIG. 6 to a digital wave, see FIG. 8.B, here LOW = 0 and HIGH = 5V. A ceramic capacitor C1 shown in FIG. 13 removes unwanted noise or spikes in the digitized wave.
An important part of the RIng-ON module is the IC 74LS123 (U1). It is a Retriggerable Monostable Multivibrator. The DC triggered multivibrator controls the output pulse width. The IC houses two such timing controllers. The first timing controller is used for Ring-ON module while the usage of the second timing controller is optional and can be used to play the buzzer for a while and stop. This feature will discuss later.

The basic pulse time is programmed by selection of external resistance R4 and capacitance C2 values. The digitized ringing signal produced at the emitter ("A") of the transistor Q3 is coupled to pin-1 the gated low-level-active input of IC U1. Once the first ring is triggered the output pulse at pin-13 of IC U1 becomes low and from then on its width keep extending by retriggering of subsequent ring pulses. After the last ring pulse is triggered the IC U1 waits or delays for TB seconds and if no ring pulse is furthered encountered the output pulse becomes high.
FIG. 8.E is a digitized 4 Ring signal input at pin-1 of IC U1 and FIG. 8.F is the corresponding output wave at pin-13 of IC U1.Similarly, FIG. 8.1 is a digitized 2 Ring signal input at pln-1 of IC U1 and FIG. 8.J is the corresponding output wave at pin-13 of IC U1. For best results, the system ground is applied to the negative terminal of the Capacitor C2. This provides the IC U1 with enough Schmitt hysteresis to ensure jitter-free triggering. For IC U1 pin-8 is ground and pin-16 is 5V / DC regulated supply.
IC 4017 (U2) and IC 555 (U3) are important parts of Ring Time Detection module. IC U2 is a decade counter, a high performance silicon gate CMOS (Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor). The IC U2 inputs are compatible with standard CMOS outputs; with pull up resistors, they are compatible with LSTTL outputs. The IC U2 uses a five stage Johnson counter and decoding logic to provide high speed operation with high noise immunity characteristic. The output pins (3, 2, 4, 7, 10, 1, 5, 6, 9) correspond to (count=1 to count=9). The clock enable pin-13 is grounded to enable active low clock input at counter clock input pin-14; a low-to-high transition on this input advances the counter to its next state.
The timer IC U3 is used for astable operation. As shown in FIG. 13, the reset pin-4 and voltage pin-8 are directly coupled to the voltage source, while discharge pin-7 is connected to voltage source through a resistor R12. The ground pin-1 is connected to ground through a resistor RIO. Threshold pin-6 and discharge pin-7 are linked by a transistor R11 at the same time threshold pin-6 is connected by a capacitor C4 whose second terminal is grounded. The duty cycle of the clock produced at the pin-3 can be controlled by the capacitor C4 and resistor R11 causing the timer to self-trigger and run as a multivibrator. FIG. 8.A shows a typical clock waveform generated during astable operation. This free running clock frequency is fed to the counter clock input pin-14 of the IC U2.
How a normal call is analyzed?
As explained above the hookswitch module's Reed Relay LI is normally closed but when the first ring appears the Reed Relay LI opens immediately and closes only after a time period of 5 seconds. Therefore during a normal call one will not hear first 4 rings but can hear subsequent rings over the telephone instrument. We will now explain how the circuit controls the Reed Relay LI by means of junction J5 which is a common point for hookswitch module as shown in FIG.12 and the intelligent circuit shown in FIG. 13.

The Reed Relay L1 is operated by the transistor Q5 whose base is controlled by two pins of IC U2 pin-3 (count=1) and pin-9 (count=9). The diodes D3 and D4 have a common junction at resistor R8 and are used so that voltages at pin-3 and pin-9 of IC U2 don't get shorted.
All though the clock is fed to the IC U2 pin-14 the counter doesn't advance and remain in a reset state as its pin-15 is continuously high because of the emitter ("B") of the transistor Q16 is high as its base coupled to IC U1 pin-13 is low. Therefore, the counter reset pin-15 is initially high forcing the count=1 that means normally pin-3 is high. During the normal state when the circuit doesn't detect any ring the Reed Relay L1 is closed. When a ring is detected the pin-15 of IC U2 becomes low therefore the counter starts incrementing by shifting its high state from pin-3 to its next counter pin-2 and so on. Therefore as there is no current to drive the transistor Q5 the hookswitch module's Reed Relay L1 gets switched off. The same is depicted in FIG. 8.C.
When IC U2 pin-9 becomes high, count=9, the timer IC U3 gets locked and the counter of IC U2 becomes stable. The clock gets disabled or locked because IC U3 trigger pin-2 becomes high as the emitter of the transistor Q6 whose base is controlled by IC U2 pin-9 becomes high. Since the terminal of the same pin, pin-9 of IC U2 drives the transistor Q5 the Reed Relay LI switches on or it is closed again. For a normal telephone call roughly during 6'^ or 7* ring the relay gets contacted again so the same rings can be heard as first ring on the telephone instrument. The same is depicted in FIG. 8.D.
How DD first protocol is analyzed?
During the DD's first protocol four rings are generated and disconnected. The digitized version of the same is depicted in FIG. 8.E. Similarly, the FIG. 8,F shows the amount of time the pin-15 of IC U2 becoming low because of the emitter ("B") of transistor Q16 and its controlling IC U1 as explained above.
If it is a correct first DD protocol - if the timing is "correct" for 4 rings - before the pin-15 of IC U2 becomes high there will be a pulse produced at pin-1 (count=6) of the same IC. See FIG. 8.G.
If the first DD protocol in not accurate - if the timing is "more" for 4 rings - before the pin-15 of IC U2 becomes high there will be yet another pulse produced at pin-6 (count=8) of the same IC. See FIG. 8.H.
How DD second protocol is analyzed?
Analysis of DD's second protocol of two ring generation and disconnection is similar to the analysis of DD's first protocol as explained above. FIG. 8.1 shows digitized version of 2 rings and FIG. 8.J shows the amount of time pin-15 of IC U2 becomes low.

If it is a correct second DD protocol - if the timing is "correct" for 2 rings - before the pin-15 of IC U2 becomes high there will be a pulse produced at pin-4 (count=3) of the same IC. See FIG. 8.K.
If the second DD protocol in not accurate - if the timing is "more" for 2 rings -before the pin-15 of IC U2 becomes high there will be yet another pulse produced at pin-10 (count=5) of the same IC. See FIG. 8.L.
For both DD protocols - if the timing is "less" condition - is taken care because immediately as the counter advances to the second count, the pulse produced at pln-2 of IC U2, resets the latching & logic module, as explained in the subsequent literature.
For both DD protocols "one count time" is taken as error tolerance, that means, during the first DD protocol if the counter advancing to count=7 and similarly for second DD protocol if the counter advancing to count=4 are accepted tolerance and are considered within limits.
Therefore for accurate DD protocols of a standard setting (4 Rings - 2 Rings), during first DDP a pulse should be produced at pin-1 (count=6) and during second DDP a pulse should be produced at pin-4 (count=3) of IC U2. Based on these ring timing detection, the logic module takes further necessary action as we shall see later. The channeling module, as discuss below, ensures that any other pulses other than the expected pulses are not taken into consideration.
Channeling module is used to control the latching module and it consists of two channels. Two of these channels are further divided as Channel -1-Set (Q9, R14, D8), Channel-1-Reset (Q10, R13, D9), Channel-2-Set (Q7, R16, 06) and Channel-2-Reset (Q8, R15, D7). During first DD protocol Channel - 1 is in operation and similarly Channel-2 is in operation during second DD protocol. During their respective operation a bit of information flows through them. They are operated by IC U4, a main part of Increment & Reset module. ICs U2 and U4 are both 4017s - decade counters. Please read above for IC details. However, IC U4 doesn't have a free running clock like IC U2. IC U4 counter advances when a pulse is applied to its pin-14. To enhance the pulse and to make it similar to a clock pulse, for proper advancement of the counter, a capacitor C5 and a resistor R25 are couple to the pin-14. For a standard setting of DD protocol (4 Rings - 2 Rings), the operating terminal of the Channel - 1 ("F") is coupled to the IC U4 pin-3 (count^^l) and the operating terminal of the Channel - 2 ("E") is couple to the IC U4 pin-2 (count=2). For other setting of DD protocol, say (2 Rings - 4 Rings) a simple swapping of F & E will serve the purpose. When DD protocol is (4 Rings - 4 Rings) or (2 Rings - 2 Rings) then F is connected to pins 3 & 2 or E is connected to pins 3 & 2 respectively.
The Latching module circuit consists of two transistors Q17 & Q18, four resistors R17, R18, R19 & R20 and two diodes D10 & D11. Schematic of this circuitry is depicted in FIG. 13. This module is used to latch or lock some signal Information and has two status conditions; 1. Latch open and 2. Latch closed.

When the latch is open, the input signal will pass through the latch circuit. After latching the signal circuit is insensitive to changes in the input signal i.e., any more changes in the input signal have no impact on the circuit. Interesting features of the latch circuit are summarized below:
1. The outputs Q and Q' are always complementary.
2. The circuit has two stable states; in one of the stable state Q = 1 which is referred to as 1 state (or set state) whereas in the other stable state Q = 0 which is referred to as the 0 state (or reset state)
3. If the circuit is in 1 state it continues to remain in this state and similarly if it is in 0 state it continues to remain in this state. This property of the circuit is referred to as memory i.e., it can store 1-bit of digital information.
In our circuit the latch is Set through the terminal "H" and Reset through the terminal "G" which are coupled to channeling module as explained above.
Now we explain the logic module consisting of four transistors Q11, Q12, Q13 & Q14 and four resistors R21, R22, R23 & R24 as shown in the FIG. 13.
Logic for Reset
What ever may be the status of latching module or which ever pin of IC U4 may be high the logic module can reset the entire circuit after It encounters a normal call. As explained above, the pin-2 (count=2) of IC U2 reset the latch Q = 1 & Q' = 0 as the counter increments. When the ring disconnects the pin-3 ("D") of IC U2 becomes high again. At this stage the logic issues an reset command to pin-15 of IC U4 thereby pin-3 ("F") becomes high, i.e., count=1. Now, Channel - 1 becomes operational.
Logic for first DD protocol
When a correct first DD protocol is received the latch receives a set pulse therefore it is closed Q = 0 & Q' = 1. When the ring disconnects the pin-3 ("D") of IC U2 becomes high again. At this stage the logic issues an increment pulse to pin-14 of IC U4 thereby its next counter pin-2 ("E") becomes high. So, Channel -2 becomes operational and Channel - 1 gets switched off.
Logic for "incorrect" second DD protocol
While the circuit is expecting the second DD protocol of 2 rings and a wrong DD protocol intercepts at this stage like...
1. A normal call or
2. A single ring or a premature second DDP or
3. An unexpected first DD protocol of 4 rings

Then latch gets a reset pulse thereby it gets opened Q = 1 & Q' = 0. The logic module instructs the IC U4 to reset so that the pin-3 ("F") becomes high again. Now the circuit expects the protocol to start from the first.
Logic for second DD protocol
When a correct second DD protocol is received the latch receives a set pulse therefore it is closed Q = 0 & Q' = 1. When the ring disconnects the pin-3 ("D") of IC U2 becomes high again. At this stage the logic issues an increment pulse to pin-14 of IC U4 thereby its next counter pin-4 ("C") becomes high.
Logic for auto reset
After the second DD protocol when pin-4 becomes high the IC U4 resets itself by means of a transistor Q15 operated by the base resistor R26 that is couple to pin-4 and its emitter connected to reset pin of IC U4.
During the reset process a square pulse is generated at Junction J8 that further triggers the Audio & Visual indicating circuits.
Audio & Visual Indicators
The Visual Indicator - Counter Display
The counter module consists of two main ICs 74LS90N and 74LS47N. Since we used 2-7 segment displays "00" four such ICs are used, IC U1 & IC U2 are 74LS90N (14 pin IC) and IC U3 and IC U4 are 74LS47N (16 pin IC). Please see schematic diagram of FIG. 14. IC U2 is coupled to IC U4 and similarly IC U1 is coupled to IC U3.
ICs U1 & U2 are monolithic decade counters each containing four master-slave flip-flops and additional gating to provide a divide-by-two counter and a three-stage binary-stage binary counter for which the count cycle length is divide-by-five. These counter ICs have gated zero reset therefore all their reset pins such as R0(1) pln-2, R0(2) pin-3, Rg(1) pin-6 and Rg(2) pin-7 are shorted and coupled to reset triggering circuit consisting of capacitor CI & resistor R3 as shown in FIG. 14. When the micro switch Swi, whose first terminal is grounded and second terminal, is connected to capacitor & resistor combination is pressed a reset pulse is generated and two ICs U1 & U2 are initialized. As explained above a square pulse that is generated at Junction J8 of FIG. 13 is triggered at terminal point "A" or input pin-14 of IC U2 making the BCD count to increment until its sequence reach 9*^ count. The next count initializes the IC U2 and it further triggers the initialized IC U1 to first count, because pin-11 of IC U2 is coupled to input pin-14 of IC U1. In this way, both counters increment until both attain count=9 i.e., output pins QD pin-11 = High, QC pin-8 = Low, QB pin-9 = Low and QA pin-12 = High. Voltage supply is given at pin-5 and pin-10 is grounded.

ICs U3 & U4 are basically drivers for BCD-To-Seven-Segment Decoding. They feature active-low outputs designed for driving common-anode of 7 segment LED display. These ICs have full ripple-blanking controls and incorporate automatic leading and/or trailing-edge zero-blanking control. The output pins of IC U2 are coupled to input pins of IC U4 as follows; pin-11 to pln-6, pln-8 to pin-2, pin-9 to pin-1 and pin-12 to pin-7. Similar pins are coupled in IC U1 and IC U3 also. 7 segment display has a common anode and its cathode pins are a, b, c, d, e, f and g. The output pins of IC U4 are coupled with input cathode pins of 7 segment display-2 as follows; pin-13 to pin-a, pin-12 to pin-b, pin-11 to pin-c, pin-10 to pin-d, pin-9 to pin-e, pin-15 to pin-f and pin-14 to pin-g. Similar pins are coupled in IC U3 and 7 segment display-1. ICs U3 & U4 have input voltage supply at plns-16 and pins-8 are grounded.
The counter display is an important feature of the invention because even when the user is not available during the email alert message the counter notes the same by means of "incrementing" and informs the user when he/she is back home.
The Audio Indicator- Timed Buzzer
A low cost version of the email informer gadget simply plays the music for say /4 a minute through the buzzer and stops when a new email arrives in his/her Inbox. This simple circuit can be constructed by means of an additional timer IC or the second timing controller built inside IC U1 (74LS123), see FIG. 13. The time to activate the buzzer is controlled by the capacitor C3 at pin-6 and the resistor R7 at pin-7 of IC U1. The same triggering pulse that increments the counter module also triggers the buzzer module. The emitter of the transistor Q4 is couple to pin-9 of IC U1 and its base receives the trigger pulse through the resistor R6. A terminal of the musical buzzer should be connected to pin-12 or Junction J3 whose other terminal is connected to voltage supply. An instant reset option that mean, stopping the play of buzzer before its 1/2 a minute play is possible by applying a low voltage through a micro switch to pin-11 (Junction J4) of IC U1. Pressing the micro switch instantly resets/stops the buzzer play.
Power to operate the circuit is obtained through an external Eliminator Supply of 9-12 Volts DC and an internal Battery pack of 9 Volts by feeding a full-wave bridge rectifier (D12, D13, D14 & D15). The output of the rectifier is fed to IC U5 (7805) which is a fixed 5 Volt regulator. The entire circuit, with the exception of the "7 segment display" of the counter module operates on the 5 volt output of IC U5. 7 segment display works directly on 9 Volts / DC.
The measured current drawn by the circuit including audio & visual modules was approx. 0.3 Amperes at room temperature of 30° Centigrade under free-air operation.

In the preferred embodiment of the present invention email informer gadget can be utilized for a personal use of an individual. However, when the gadget is required to be utilized by a group of individuals, using a single telephone line, then the email informer gadget can be modified for the purpose. For instance the circuit can be designed in such a way that when two DD ringing signals come LED indicator with inscription "user1 got an email!" gets switched ON, similarly when four DD ringing signals come LED indicator with inscription "user2 got an email!" gets switched ON and so on. Therefore instead one LED indicator, depending on the number of users, so many LED indicators can be added to the gadget.
While particular embodiments of the present invention have been shown and described, it will be obvious to those skilled in the art that changes and modifications may be made without departing from this invention in its broader aspects and, therefore, the appended claims are to encompass within their scope all such changes and modifications as fall within the true sprit and scope of this invention.


I claim:
1. A method of electronic mail notification to the recipient via telephone line
without requiring a log-on to e-mail server, comprising of the following steps;
- receiving the email onto the email server,
- retrieving the recipient's telephone number through search module,
- initiating the recipient through initiating module,
- alerting the recipient
2. A method as claimed in claim 1 wherein the search module, comprises the
steps of
- reading the database,
- comparing the email ID with the recipient's email ID,
- retrieving the corresponding telephone number if the email ID of the database matches the recipient's email ID.
3. A method as claimed in claim 1 wherein the initiating module, comprises the
steps of
- dialing the recipient's telephone number and disconnecting after four rings,
- dialing the recipient's telephone number and disconnecting after two rings.
4. A method as claimed in claim 1 wherein the alerting module, comprises the
steps of
- digitizing the received telephonic ringing signal,
- differentiates the call from the email server from that of normal telephonic ring,
- call from the server will trigger the recipient's informing means,
- the recipient will be alerted by audio visual means.
5. A method as claimed in claim 4 wherein the differentiation of the call from
the email server with that of normal telephonic ring, comprises the steps of:
- if the ring count is four, the latch changes its OFF status to ON status,
- if the ring count is two and the latch status is ON, then audio visual indicating module is activated,
- the ring otherwise, the latch status changes back to it's initial OFF status.
6. A system for electronic mail notification to the recipient, via telephone line
without requiring a log-on to email server, comprising:
- means for receiving email,
- means for identifying the recipient,
- means for informing the recipient.
7. A system as claimed in claim 6, wherein email receiving means comprises of a
server connected to the internet.

8. A system as claimed in claim 6, wherein the means for identifying the
recipient comprises of a storage medium from where the corresponding
telephone number of the recipient's email ID is retrieved.
9. A system as claimed in claim 6, wherein the means for informing the
recipient, a printed circuit board housed inside a plastic/metallic container,
comprises of
- digitization module and logic module
- battery box, telephone plug in socket, power in socket and audio visual
indicators.
10. A system as claimed in claim 9 wherein the digitization module of the circuit
is a means of transforming the analog ringing signal of the telephone into
digital form for further analysis.
11. A system as claimed in claim 9 wherein the logic module of the circuit is a
means for differentiating a normal telephonic ring with the ring of the server
by counting the digital ringing signals.

Documents:

0445-mas-2001 abstract duplicate.pdf

0445-mas-2001 abstract.pdf

0445-mas-2001 claims duplicate.pdf

0445-mas-2001 claims.pdf

0445-mas-2001 correspondence others.pdf

0445-mas-2001 correspondence po.pdf

0445-mas-2001 description (complete) duplicate.pdf

0445-mas-2001 description (complete).pdf

0445-mas-2001 drawings.pdf

0445-mas-2001 form-1.pdf

0445-mas-2001 form-13.pdf

0445-mas-2001 form-19.pdf


Patent Number 200773
Indian Patent Application Number 445/MAS/2001
PG Journal Number 8/2007
Publication Date 23-Feb-2007
Grant Date 09-Jun-2006
Date of Filing 06-Jun-2001
Name of Patentee T.SONY ROY,
Applicant Address S/O. SRI. T. S. SAMUEL C-96, SANJEEVA REDDY NAGAR COLONY HYDERABAD - 500 038.
Inventors:
# Inventor's Name Inventor's Address
1 T.SONY ROY, S/O. SRI. T. S. SAMUEL C-96, SANJEEVA REDDY NAGAR COLONY HYDERABAD - 500 038.
PCT International Classification Number H04L9/00
PCT International Application Number N/A
PCT International Filing date
PCT Conventions:
# PCT Application Number Date of Convention Priority Country
1 NA